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Abandoning "the other": statistical enumeration of Swedish Sami, 1700 to 1945 and beyond.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135562
Source
Ber Wiss. 2010 Sep;33(3):263-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Per Axelsson
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Centre for Sami Research, Umeå, Sweden. per.axelsson@cesam.umu.se
Source
Ber Wiss. 2010 Sep;33(3):263-79
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Censuses - history
Ethnic groups - history
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Population Dynamics
Population Groups - history
Sweden
Abstract
Sweden has one of the world's most eminent and exhaustive records of statistical information on its population. As early as the eighteenth century, ethnic notations were being made in parish registers throughout the country, and by the early nineteenth century a specific category for the Sami population had been added to the forms used to collect data for the Tabellverket (National Population Statistics). Beginning in 1860, the Sami were also counted in the first official census of the Swedish state. Nonetheless--and in contrast to many other countries--Sweden today lacks separate statistical information not only about its sole recognized indigenous population but also about other ethnic groups. The present paper investigates Sweden's attempts to enumerate its indigenous Sami population prior to World War II and the cessation of ethnic enumeration after the war. How have the Sami been identified and enumerated? How have statistical categories been constructed, and how have they changed over time? The aim of this essay is not to assess the validity of the demographic sources. Instead the paper will explore the historical, social, and cultural factors that have had a bearing on how a dominant administrative structure has dealt with the statistical construct of an indigenous population.
PubMed ID
21466142 View in PubMed
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Arctic indigenous peoples as representations and representatives of climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95467
Source
Soc Stud Sci. 2008 Jun;38(3):351-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Martello Marybeth Long
Author Affiliation
marybeth.martello@gmail.com
Source
Soc Stud Sci. 2008 Jun;38(3):351-76
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Climate
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Population Groups - history
Abstract
Recent scientific findings, as presented in the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA), indicate that climate change in the Arctic is happening now, at a faster rate than elsewhere in the world, and with major implications for peoples of the Arctic (especially indigenous peoples) and the rest of the planet. This paper examines scientific and political representations of Arctic indigenous peoples that have been central to the production and articulation of these claims. ACIA employs novel forms and strategies of representation that reflect changing conceptual models and practices of global change science and depict indigenous peoples as expert, exotic, and at-risk. These portrayals emerge alongside the growing political activism of Arctic indigenous peoples who present themselves as representatives or embodiments of climate change itself as they advocate for climate change mitigation policies. These mutually constitutive forms of representation suggest that scientific ways of seeing the global environment shape and are shaped by the public image and voice of global citizens. Likewise, the authority, credibility, and visibility of Arctic indigenous activists derive, in part, from their status as at-risk experts, a status buttressed by new scientific frameworks and methods that recognize and rely on the local experiences and knowledges of indigenous peoples. Analyses of these relationships linking scientific and political representations of Arctic climate change build upon science and technology studies (STS) scholarship on visualization, challenge conventional notions of globalization, and raise questions about power and accountability in global climate change research.
PubMed ID
19069077 View in PubMed
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Behavioral and mental health challenges for indigenous youth: research and clinical perspectives for primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146924
Source
Pediatr Clin North Am. 2009 Dec;56(6):1461-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Michael Storck
Timothy Beal
Jan Garver Bacon
Polly Olsen
Author Affiliation
Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, P.O. Box 359300, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. storck@u.washington.edu
Source
Pediatr Clin North Am. 2009 Dec;56(6):1461-79
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Alcoholism - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Child Behavior
Child Behavior Disorders - prevention & control
Conduct Disorder - prevention & control
Cultural Characteristics
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration - standards - trends
History, 20th Century
Humans
Indians, North American - history - psychology
Mental health
Narration
Oceanic Ancestry Group - history - psychology
Population Groups - history - psychology
Primary Health Care - organization & administration - standards - trends
Research
Social Environment
Trust
United States
Abstract
After first discussing historical, community and epidemiologic perspectives pertaining to mental health problems of Indigenous youth and families, this article reviews available research data on behavioral and mental health interventions and the roles that Native and Indigenous research programs are serving. Given the legacy of transgenerational trauma experienced by Indigenous peoples, community-based research and treatment methods are essential for solving these problems. The primary care provider stands in a unique position within the community to offer a "coinvestigator spirit" to youth and families in the pursuit of improving behavioral health. Strategies are presented for using the research literature, and collaborating with communities and families to help solve behavioral and mental health problems.
PubMed ID
19962031 View in PubMed
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Indigenous Infant Mortality by Age and Season of Birth, 1800-1899: Did Season of Birth Affect Children's Chances for Survival?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295887
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 12 23; 15(1):
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
12-23-2017
Author
Lena Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research, Umeå University, Umeå 90187, Sweden. lena.karlsson@umu.se.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 12 23; 15(1):
Date
12-23-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Female
History, 19th Century
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - history
Infant, Newborn
Male
Parturition
Population Groups - history - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper focuses on the influence of season of birth on infant mortality among the Sami and non-Sami populations in northern Sweden during the nineteenth century. The source material is a set of data files from the Demographic Data Base at Umeå University, making it possible to combine age at death (in days), month of death, and month of birth over the course of the entire century. Cox regression models reveal that for the first week of life, season of birth had no influence on the risk of mortality. For the Sami, the results showed that being born during winter was related to a higher risk of neonatal mortality, and being born during summer was related to a higher risk of mortality after six months of age. Furthermore, for the Sami, the neonatal mortality showed a U-shaped pattern with a minimum in June-August, whereas the corresponding pattern among the non-Sami was flatter. The findings shed light on vulnerability in two populations sharing the same environment, but diverging in terms of social, economic, and cultural factors.
Notes
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Jul 07;11(7):6940-54 PMID 25003551
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PubMed ID
29295484 View in PubMed
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Infant mortality of Sami and settlers in Northern Sweden: the era of colonization 1750-1900.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130015
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011 ; 4 : 33-40.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
  1 document  
Author
Peter Sköld
Per Axelsson
Lena Karlsson
Len Smith
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011 ; 4 : 33-40.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
File Size
348758
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Female
Health status
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant Mortality - history - trends
Infant, Newborn
Male
Parity
Population Groups - history - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Sweden
Demography
Indigenous peoples
Seasonality
Sami
Vulnerability
Abstract
The study deals with infant mortality (IMR) that is one of the most important aspects of indigenous vulnerability.
The Sami are one of very few indigenous peoples with an experience of a positive mortality transition.
Using unique mortality data from the period 1750-1900 Sami and the colonizers in northern Sweden are compared in order to reveal an eventual infant mortality transition.
The results show ethnic differences with the Sami having higher IMR, although the differences decrease over time. There were also geographical and cultural differences within the Sami, with significantly lower IMR among the South Sami. Generally, parity has high explanatory value, where an increased risk is noted for children born as number five or higher among siblings.
There is a striking trend of decreasing IMR among the Sami after 1860, which, however, was not the result of professional health care. Other indigenous peoples of the Arctic still have higher mortality rates, and IMR below 100 was achieved only after 1950 in most countries. The decrease in Sami infant mortality was certainly an important factor in their unique health transition, but the most significant change occurred after 1900.
Notes
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Cites: Soc Hist Med. 1988 Dec;1(3):329-5811621729
PubMed ID
22043216 View in PubMed
Documents

Skold-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

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Introduction: Origins and settlement of the indigenous populations of the Aleutian archipelago.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136062
Source
Hum Biol. 2010 Dec;82(5-6):481-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Dixie West
Dennis O'Rourke
Michael H Crawford
Author Affiliation
Biodiversity Institute and Natural History Museum, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045, USA.
Source
Hum Biol. 2010 Dec;82(5-6):481-6
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
History, Ancient
Humans
Population Density
Population Groups - history - statistics & numerical data
Notes
Erratum In: Hum Biol. 2011 Apr;83(2):331
PubMed ID
21417880 View in PubMed
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The northern population development; colonization and mortality in Swedish Sápmi, 1776-1895.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86471
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):27-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Sköld Peter
Axelsson Per
Author Affiliation
Centre for Sami Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. peter.skold@cesam.umu.se
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):27-42
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Arctic Regions
Continental Population Groups - history - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
Humans
Male
Mortality - history - trends
Population Dynamics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of the Consequence of Colonization project is to study population development and mortality in Swedish Sápmi. This article, the first to be drawn from our research, compares these changes between Sami and non-Sami, South and North Sami. Study design. Longitudinal individual based data from computerized records ofthe Glillivare, Undersåker and Frostviken parishes, divided into 2 40-year periods: 1776-1815 and 1856-1895. METHODS: The main source material used for the present study was a set of data files from the Demographic Data Base (DDB) at Umeå University, the largest historical database in Europe. A Sami cohort was created by indicators of ethnicity in the parish registers, and was later extended with automatic linkages to children and parents. RESULTS: Sami mortality rates show great fluctuations during the period 1776-1815, almost always peaking at a higher rate than in the rest of Sweden. The non-Sami group had lower mortality rates compared with both Sweden as a whole and the Sami in the parish. Between 1856 and 1895, the non-Sami experienced a very small reduction in their mortality rates and the Sami experienced overall improvement in their health status. Significant differences in age-specific mortality appear when the South and North Sami are compared, showing that the South Sami had far lower child mortality rates. CONCLUSIONS: The Sami population's health status improved during the nineteenth century. This indicates that they had advanced in the epidemiologic transition model. A corresponding change is not found for the non-Sami group.
PubMed ID
18468257 View in PubMed
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Race, class, and health: school medical inspection and "healthy" children in British Columbia, 1890-1930.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190582
Source
Can Bull Med Hist. 2002;19(1):95-112
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Mona Gleason
Author Affiliation
Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia.
Source
Can Bull Med Hist. 2002;19(1):95-112
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Continental Population Groups - history
Health Care Surveys - history
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Public Health - history
School Health Services - history
Social Class
Abstract
School medical inspection provides a window on the construction of "healthy" children in British Columbia over the turn of the 20th century. Public health reformers, doctors, teachers, and school nurses encouraged children and their parents to conform to a particular model of healthy living. This paper argues that this model, reflecting Anglo-Celtic, middle-class, and urban sensibilities, pathologized children and families unable or unwilling to conform to this powerful social ideal. Far form simply signaling the triumph of sanitary science, school medical inspection was a powerful means of legitimizing existing relations of power and confirming social boundaries.
PubMed ID
11954618 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.