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Accounting for the contribution of vitamin B to Canada's WWII effort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138851
Source
J Hist Sociol. 2010;23(4):517-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Robyn Braun
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta.
Source
J Hist Sociol. 2010;23(4):517-41
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread - economics - history
Canada - ethnology
Flour - economics - history
Food, Fortified - economics - history
Government Programs - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
History, 20th Century
Humans
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Public Health - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Vitamin B Complex - history
Vitamin B Deficiency - ethnology - history
World War II
Abstract
Canada began to fortify its flour and bread with vitamin B when it entered the Second World War. The decision was informed by the biology of vitamin B and therefore I suggest that the complexity of this political maneuver can best be understood by considering the specificity of the biochemistry of vitamin B. In this paper I will show that the specific biology of vitamin B allowed the Canadian government the possibility of a healthier population under wartime conditions but also allowed the government a variety of means by which to develop and organize food processing practices to this end.
PubMed ID
21132948 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Canadian National Retirement Risk Index: employing statistics Canada's LifePaths to measure the financial security of future Canadian seniors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133004
Source
Can Public Policy. 2011;37(Suppl):S73-S94
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Bonnie-Jeanne MacDonald
Kevin D Moore
He Chen
Robert L Brown
Source
Can Public Policy. 2011;37(Suppl):S73-S94
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - ethnology
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Government - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Middle Aged
Pensions - history
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Public Policy - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Research - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Residence Characteristics - history
Retirement - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors - history
Abstract
This article measures a Canadian National Retirement Risk Index (NRRI). Originally developed by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, the NRRI is a forward-looking measure that evaluates the proportion of working-aged individuals who are at risk of not maintaining their standard of living in retirement. The Canadian retirement income system has been very effective in reducing elderly poverty, but our results suggest that it has been much less successful in maintaining the living standards of Canadians after retirement. Since the earlier years of the new millennium, we find that approximately one-third of retiring Canadians have been unable to maintain their working-age consumption after retirement—a trend that is projected to worsen significantly for future Canadian retirees. The release of the Canadian NRRI is timely given the widespread concern that the current Canadian retirement income system is inadequate. Many proposals have recently emerged to extend and/or enhance Canadian public pensions, and the NRRI is a tool to test their merit. The methodology underlying the Canadian NRRI is uniquely sophisticated and comprehensive on account of our employment of Statistics Canada’s LifePaths, a state-of-the-art stochastic microsimulation model of the Canadian population. For instance, the Canadian NRRI is novel in that it models all of the relevant sources of consumption before and after retirement, while accounting for important features that are typically neglected in retirement adequacy studies such as family size, the variation of consumption over a person’s lifetime, and the heterogeneity among the life courses of individuals.
PubMed ID
21751486 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changing patterns of health and disease among the Aleuts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187203
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(1):48-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Anne Keenleyside
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(1):48-69
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology - education - history
Arctic regions - ethnology
Disease - economics - ethnology - history - psychology
Epidemiologic Studies
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Health
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
North America - ethnology
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Abstract
Compared to other regions of North America, there have been relatively few paleopathological studies of arctic populations to date, particularly those aimed at elucidating patterns of health and disease prior to contact, and assessing temporal changes in disease patterns. In the present study, four Aleut skeletal samples representing one pre-contact population from Umnak Island in the eastern Aleutian Islands (N=65), and three late pre-contact/early contact period populations from Umnak, Kagamil, and Shiprock Islands (N=227), were examined macroscopically for indicators of health status. The analysis revealed some evidence of declining health in the late pre-contact/early contact period. Statistical comparisons of the earlier and later samples indicated a significantly higher frequency of cribra orbitalia and cranial infection in the later sample compared to the earlier one. Archaeological, epidemiological, and historical data point to several possible explanations for these findings, including the introduction of new pathogens by Europeans.
PubMed ID
21755640 View in PubMed
Less detail

Close relatives and outsiders: village people in the city of Yakutsk, Siberia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165870
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2007;44(1):51-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Tatiana Argounova-Low
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2007;44(1):51-61
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology - education - history
Community Networks - history
Demography - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Intergenerational Relations - ethnology
Population Dynamics - history
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Rural Population - history
Siberia - ethnology
Social Alienation - psychology
Social Behavior - history
Abstract
The paper presents a snapshot of the city-village connections in the city of Yakutsk and an anthropological account of the dynamics of the relationship between the city and villages around it. Demographic changes that started in the 1980s, prompted by a decline in agriculture, initiated an exodus of the rural population from the countryside into the city of Yakutsk. This paper explores the migration dynamics of the rural population to the city. Two conflicting aspects of the relationship between the city and village are the focus of this paper: treating village people as close kin and as outsiders. I examine the image of ulusnik [a villager] and consider rationales behind the stigma attached to it and a social role of the Other which is imposed on the people from the countryside.
PubMed ID
21847840 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community responses to violence in Holman, Northwest Territory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187192
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):87-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Alice Kimiksana
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):87-9
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic regions - ethnology
Canada - ethnology
Community Health Services - history
Community Mental Health Services - history
Community Networks - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Intergenerational Relations - ethnology
Northwest Territories - ethnology
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Residence Characteristics - history
Social Responsibility
Stress, Psychological - ethnology - history
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - history
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - history
Violence - economics - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Abstract
When we talk about narrative, we often focus on the story and the teller, but rarely on the listener. Yet often the first step in healing is finding someone who will listen to you and truly hear your story. Alice Kimiksana and others in the Canadian Arctic village of Holman, who are concerned about the community’s high suicide rate, understand this basic healing principal very well. They have worked together to create a Help Line—a confidential listening and crisis intervention program—for their community. Kimiksana talks about how in Holman, as in other northern communities, trauma led parents to teach their children not to talk about their pain, their fear, or their abusive experiences, including those that occurred in the residential schools. As a result, even years later, the pain, fear, and hurt can become unbearable, leading sometimes to alcohol and drug abuse, and sometimes to violence toward oneself or others. Educational groups, Healing Circles, and youth groups are starting to help. However, unless there are helpers who will listen when people begin to tell their stories, this first step in healing cannot take place and the cycle of intergenerational trauma will not be broken.
PubMed ID
21774147 View in PubMed
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Cultural dissimilarity and intermarriage. a longitudinal study of immigrants in Sweden, 1990–2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129785
Source
Int Migr Rev. 2011;45(2):297-324
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Martin Dribe
Christer Lundh
Author Affiliation
Lund University.
Source
Int Migr Rev. 2011;45(2):297-324
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Diversity
Emigrants and Immigrants - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Marriage - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Social Conditions - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Identification
Social Values - ethnology - history
Spouses - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
Intermarriage with natives is a key indicator of immigrant integration. This article studies intermarriage for 138 immigrant groups in Sweden, using longitudinal individual level data. It shows great variation in marriage patterns across immigrant populations, ranging from over 70 percent endogamy in some immigrants groups to below 5 percent in other groups. Although part of this variation is explained by human capital and the structure of the marriage market, cultural factors (values, religion, and language) play an important role as well. Immigrants from culturally more dissimilar countries are less likely to intermarry with natives, and instead more prone to endogamy.
PubMed ID
22069769 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cultural remains in local and regional context on the central Alaska Peninsula: housepits, language, and cultural affinities at Marraatuq after 1000 B.P.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101947
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2010;47(2):97-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Patricia L McClenahan
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2010;47(2):97-103
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Anthropology, Cultural - education - history
Archaeology - education - history
Continental Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Family - ethnology - history - psychology
Family Health - ethnology
History, 15th Century
History, 16th Century
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Housing - history
Humans
Language - history
Residence Characteristics - history
Abstract
Professor Dumond's research on the Alaska Peninsula provided information that prior to 1,000 years ago people of both sides of the Alaska Peninsula shared material culture and exhibited subsistence interests that persisted into historic times, During the Late Precontact Era (ca. 1100 A.D. to mid-1700s) these Alutiiq societies shared cultural traits including language, house styles, and material culture with their relatives and neighbors on Kodiak Island. Until recently, few data were available regarding potential variability in house construction techniques, or styles and functions of Alutiiq semi-subterranean houses of this era found on the Alaska Peninsula, This paper provides examples of a few known prehistoric and historic Alaska Peninsula and Kodiak Alutiiq houses and presents previously unreported data from archaeological tests at Marraatuq on the Central Alaska Peninsula, Taken together with Dumond's 1998-1999 field work at Leader Creek and archaeological research on Kodiak Island, the work provides further evidence that interregional interaction was strong during the Late Precontact Era. However, large population centers and ranked political hierarchies probably were not hallmarks of central Alaska Peninsula communities during the Late Precontact Era and historic times as they were on the Kodiak and Aleutian islands.
PubMed ID
21495284 View in PubMed
Less detail

The distribution of alcohol among the natives of Russian America.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101948
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2010;47(2):69-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Andrei V Grinëv
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2010;47(2):69-79
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - history - psychology
Alcoholic Beverages - history
Alcoholic Intoxication - ethnology - history
Alcoholism - ethnology - history
Anthropology, Cultural - education - history
Colonialism - history
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Public Health - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Russia - ethnology
Abstract
The study of archival materials and published historical and ethnographic sources shows that alcohol played an insignificant role in contacts with the aboriginal population during the Russian colonization of Alaska. The Russian-American Company (RAC) tried to fight alcoholism and limited access of spirits to the natives of the Russian colonies partially for moral and partially for economic reasons. The only Alaskan natives to whom agents of the RAC supplied rum in large quantities were the Tlingit and Kaigani Haida in 1830–1842, and among them excessive drinking became a widespread problem. The chief suppliers of alcohol for these Native Americans were the British and American traders at the end of the eighteenth century. In the mid-nineteenth century traders and whalers began to supply it to the Bering Sea Eskimos as well. Russian colonization was marked by efforts to limit drunkenness in the native populations. In that sense, Russian colonization was favorable in comparison with subsequent American colonization of Alaska.
PubMed ID
21495282 View in PubMed
Less detail

39 records – page 1 of 4.