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Abusive head trauma among children in Alaska: a population-based assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107670
Source
Pages 472-479 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):472-479
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Jared Parrish
Cathy Baldwin-Johnson
Margaret Volz
Yvonne Goldsmith
Author Affiliation
MCH-Epidemiology Unit, Alaska Division of Public Health, Anchorage, AK, USA. jwp22@live.unc.edu
Source
Pages 472-479 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):472-479
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alaska - epidemiology
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Child Abuse - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Maternal Age
Young Adult
Abstract
Serious physical abuse resulting in a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been implicated as an underreported cause of infant mortality. Nearly 80% of all abusive head trauma (AHT) occurs among children
Notes
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PubMed ID
23986886 View in PubMed
Documents
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Adult obesity prevalence in Canada and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134392
Source
NCHS Data Brief. 2011 Mar;(56):1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Margot Shields
Margaret D Carroll
Cynthia L Ogden
Author Affiliation
Statistics Canada, Health Analysis Division.
Source
NCHS Data Brief. 2011 Mar;(56):1-8
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology
Prevalence
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Obesity is a public health challenge throughout the world. Ongoing monitoring of trends in obesity is important to assess interventions aimed at preventing or reducing the burden of obesity. Since the 1960s, measured height and weight have been collected in the United States as part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). In Canada, data on measured height and weight have been collected from nationally representative samples of the population less regularly. This changed in 2007 with the launch of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS), the scope and purpose of which are similar to those of NHANES. The objective of this report is to compare estimates of the prevalence of obesity between Canadian and American adults.
PubMed ID
21592419 View in PubMed
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Aging and health: an examination of differences between older Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100475
Source
Can J Aging. 2010 Sep;29(3):369-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Kathi Wilson
Mark W Rosenberg
Sylvia Abonyi
Robert Lovelace
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, University of Toronto Mississauga, ON. kathi.wilson@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2010 Sep;29(3):369-82
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Alcoholism - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease - ethnology
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Life Expectancy - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Poverty - ethnology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - ethnology
Abstract
The Aboriginal population in Canada, much younger than the general population, has experienced a trend towards aging over the past decade. Using data from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and the 2000/2001 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), this article examines differences in health status and the determinants of health and health care use between the 55-and-older Aboriginal population and non-Aboriginal population. The results show that the older Aboriginal population is unhealthier than the non-Aboriginal population across all age groups; differences in health status, however, appear to converge as age increases. Among those aged 55 to 64, 7 per cent of the Aboriginal population report three or more chronic conditions compared with 2 per cent of the non-Aboriginal population. Yet, among those aged 75 and older, 51 per cent of the Aboriginal population report three or more chronic conditions in comparison with 23 per cent of the non-Aboriginal population.
PubMed ID
20731890 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and suicide in the Nenets Autonomous Okrug and Arkhangelsk Oblast, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289305
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:30965
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
Yury A Sumarokov
Tormod Brenn
Alexander V Kudryavtsev
Oleg Sidorenkov
Odd Nilssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, UiT-The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:30965
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Arctic Regions
Autopsy
Female
Humans
Male
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Russia
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
High suicide rates in the Russian North are coupled with high alcohol consumption in the described populations.
To investigate the potential role of alcohol consumption on suicides in the Nenets Autonomous Okrug (NAO) in 2002-2012 and to compare this information with corresponding data from the neighboring Arkhangelsk Oblast (AO).
Retrospective population-based mortality study.
Data from autopsy reports were used to identify 252 cases of suicide in the NAO and 1,198 cases in the AO in the period 2002-2012. Postmortem blood alcohol content (BAC) was available for 228 cases in the NAO and 1,185 cases in the AO. BAC as well as other selected variables were compared between the NAO and the AO among women and men, different age groups, ethnic groups, and selected variables of suicide.
Alcohol was present in the blood of 74.1% of male and 82.9% of female suicide cases in the NAO, which was significantly higher than the proportions found in the AO (59.3% of male and 46.6% female cases). BAC
Notes
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PubMed ID
27452190 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use trajectories and problem drinking over the course of adolescence: a study of north american indigenous youth and their caretakers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134622
Source
J Health Soc Behav. 2011 Jun;52(2):228-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Jacob E Cheadle
Les B Whitbeck
Author Affiliation
University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, USA. j.e.cheade@gmail.com
Source
J Health Soc Behav. 2011 Jun;52(2):228-45
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Caregivers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
North America - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Risk assessment
Social Support
Stress, Psychological
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
This study investigated the links between alcohol use trajectories and problem drinking (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition abuse/dependence) using five waves of data from 727 North American Indigenous adolescents between 10 and 17 years from eight reservations sharing a common language and culture. Growth mixture models linking fundamental causes, social stressors, support, and psychosocial pathways to problem drinking via alcohol use trajectories over the early life course were estimated. Results indicated that 20 percent of the adolescents began drinking at 11 to 12 years of age and that another 20 percent began drinking shortly thereafter. These early drinkers were at greatly elevated risk for problem drinking, as were those who began drinking at age 13. The etiological analysis revealed that stressors (e.g., perceived discrimination) directly and indirectly influenced early and problem alcohol use by decreasing positive school attitudes while increasing feelings of anger and perceived delinquent friendships. Girls were found to be at risk independently of these other factors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21558489 View in PubMed
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America's Churning Races: Race and Ethnicity Response Changes Between Census 2000 and the 2010 Census.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286886
Source
Demography. 2017 Feb;54(1):259-284
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Carolyn A Liebler
Sonya R Porter
Leticia E Fernandez
James M Noon
Sharon R Ennis
Source
Demography. 2017 Feb;54(1):259-284
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Asian Americans - statistics & numerical data
Censuses
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
A person's racial or ethnic self-identification can change over time and across contexts, which is a component of population change not usually considered in studies that use race and ethnicity as variables. To facilitate incorporation of this aspect of population change, we show patterns and directions of individual-level race and Hispanic response change throughout the United States and among all federally recognized race/ethnic groups. We use internal U.S. Census Bureau data from the 2000 and 2010 censuses in which responses have been linked at the individual level (N = 162 million). Approximately 9.8 million people (6.1 %) in our data have a different race and/or Hispanic-origin response in 2010 than they did in 2000. Race response change was especially common among those reported as American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, Other Pacific Islander, in a multiple-race response group, or Hispanic. People reported as non-Hispanic white, black, or Asian in 2000 usually had the same response in 2010 (3 %, 6 %, and 9 % of responses changed, respectively). Hispanic/non-Hispanic ethnicity responses were also usually consistent (13 % and 1 %, respectively, changed). We found a variety of response change patterns, which we detail. In many race/Hispanic response groups, we see population churn in the form of large countervailing flows of response changes that are hidden in cross-sectional data. We find that response changes happen across ages, sexes, regions, and response modes, with interesting variation across racial/ethnic categories. Researchers should address the implications of race and Hispanic-origin response change when designing analyses and interpreting results.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28105578 View in PubMed
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Analysis of influential factors associated with the smoking behavior of aboriginal schoolchildren in remote Taiwanese mountainous areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123740
Source
J Sch Health. 2012 Jul;82(7):318-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Hsiao-Ling Huang
Chih-Cheng Hsu
Wu-Der Peng
Yea-Yin Yen
Ted Chen
Chih-Yang Hu
Hon-Yi Shi
Chien-Hung Lee
Fu-Li Chen
Pi-Li Lin
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Hygiene, College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung City 80708, Taiwan.
Source
J Sch Health. 2012 Jul;82(7):318-27
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Altitude
Confidence Intervals
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Peer Group
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Schools
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Social Environment
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A disparity in smoking behavior exists between the general and minority populations residing in Taiwan's mountainous areas. This study analyzed individual and environmental factors associated with children's smoking behavior in these areas of Taiwan.
In this school-based study, data on smoking behavior and related factors for mountain-dwelling students were obtained from the 2008 and 2009 Control of School-aged Children Smoking Study surveys. A representative sample (N = 1239) from 26 primary schools was included. The association among 3 groups (never-, former-, and current-smokers) and the potential variables were simultaneously examined using unordered polytomous logistic regression analysis.
Between 13% and 34% of ever-smokers reported that their first smoking experience was in third grade. More than 70% were found to have bought cigarettes and 87% reported that the tobacco retailers had sold them cigarettes. The significant factors for current-smokers were predisposing factors, ie, attitude toward smoking (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.21); reinforcing factors, ie, family smoked in front of me (AOR = 2.44), friends smoked in front of me (AOR = 16.24), and school staff smoked in front of me (AOR = 2.98); and enabling factors, ie, cigarette availability and accessibility (AOR = 2.16 and 2.42, respectively). A student's perceived punishment for smoking at school had a positive significant effect on the risk of being former-smokers (AOR = 1.57).
The findings provide a basis for school and community to design and implement effective anti-smoking programs for remote mountain-based students to further reduce youth smoking.
PubMed ID
22671948 View in PubMed
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An observational study of immigrant mortality differences in Norway by reason for migration, length of stay and characteristics of sending countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299020
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 04 17; 18(1):508
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
04-17-2018
Author
Astri Syse
Minja T Dzamarija
Bernadette N Kumar
Esperanza Diaz
Author Affiliation
Statistics Norway, Oslo, Norway. sya@ssb.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 04 17; 18(1):508
Date
04-17-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Refugees - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Abstract
Knowledge of mortality differentials in immigrant groups depending on their reason for migration, length of stay in host countries and characteristics of sending countries may be beneficial for policy interventions aimed to improve various immigrant groups' health and welfare.
We employed discrete-time hazard regression models with time-varying covariates to compare the death risk of immigrants to those of Norwegian-born natives using linked register data on the Norwegian population aged 25-79 during 1990-2015. More than 492,000 deaths occurred in around 4.6 million individuals. All analyses were adjusted for sex, age, calendar time and sociodemographic characteristics.
Immigrants had an 11% survival advantage overall. Those immigrating due to work or education had the lowest death risk, whereas refugees had the highest death risk (albeit lower than that of natives). Death risks increased markedly with length of stay, and were most pronounced for those having spent more than 40% of their lives in Norway. Net of reason for migration, only minor differences were observed depending on Human Development Index characteristics of sending countries.
Independent of reason for migration and characteristics of sending countries, those who immigrate to Norway in adulthood appear to be particularly healthy. The higher death risk associated with prolonged lengths of stay suggests that disadvantageous 'acculturation' or stress factors related to the post-migration period may play a role in the long run. The health and welfare of long-term immigrants thus warrants further research.
PubMed ID
29665802 View in PubMed
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Are there differences in injury mortality among refugees and immigrants compared with native-born?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124074
Source
Inj Prev. 2013 Apr;19(2):100-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Marie Norredam
Maja Olsbjerg
Jorgen H Petersen
Bjarne Laursen
Allan Krasnik
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. mano@sund.ku.dk
Source
Inj Prev. 2013 Apr;19(2):100-5
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Refugees - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Regression Analysis
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Young Adult
Abstract
The authors studied injury mortality in Denmark among refugees and immigrants compared with that among native Danes.
A register-based, historical prospective cohort design. All refugees (n=29, 139) and family reunited immigrants (n=27, 134) who between 1 January 1993 and 31 December 1999 received residence permission were included and matched 1:4 on age and sex with native Danes. Civil registration numbers were cross-linked to the Register of Causes of Death, and fatalities due to unintentional and intentional injuries were identified based on ICD-10 diagnosis. Sex-specific mortality ratios were estimated by migrant status and region of birth, adjusting for age and income and using a Cox regression model after a median follow-up of 11-12 years.
Compared with native Danes, both female (RR=0.44; 95% CI 0.23 to 0.83) and male (RR=0.40; 95% CI 0.29 to 0.56) refugees as well as female (RR=0.40; 95% CI 0.21 to 0.76) and male (RR=0.22; 95% CI 0.12 to 0.42) immigrants had significantly lower mortality from unintentional injuries. Suicide rates were significantly lower for male refugees (RR=0.38; 95% CI 0.24 to 0.61) and male immigrants (RR=0.24; 95% CI 0.10 to 0.59), whereas their female counterparts showed no significant differences. Only immigrant women had a significantly higher homicide rate (RR=3.09; 95% CI 1.11 to 8.60) compared with native Danes.
Overall results were advantageous to migrant groups. Research efforts should concentrate on investigating protective factors among migrants, which may benefit injury prevention in the majority population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22627779 View in PubMed
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Assessing health care in Canada's North: what can we learn from national and regional surveys?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264982
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:28436
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
  1 document  
Author
T Kue Young
Carmina Ng
Susan Chatwood
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:28436
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
975329
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Care Surveys/methods
Humans
Male
Northwest Territories
Population Groups/statistics & numerical data
Sensitivity and specificity
Young Adult
Abstract
Health surveys are a rich source of information on a variety of health issues, including health care.
This article compares various national and regional surveys in terms of their geographical coverage with respect to the Canadian North, especially their Aboriginal population, and the comparability of the survey contents relating to health care.
Three surveys were selected as providing some information on health care, with separate estimates for the North and its Aboriginal populations. They are the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and the First Nations Regional Health Survey (RHS).
Different surveys focus on different categories of Aboriginal people, and no single survey has covered all categories of Aboriginal people in the North consistently. RHS is targeted at the on-reserve First Nations population only. APS and CCHS sample the off-reserve First Nations population as well as Métis and Inuit. To achieve adequate sample size for North-South comparisons and comparisons among Aboriginal groups within the North, several cycles of the biennial/annual CCHS can be merged, producing a large data set with consistent coverage of topics using comparable questions. The content areas of the 3 surveys can be broadly categorized as health status, health determinants and health care. Substantial variation exists across surveys in the domains covered. There are also changes over time in terms of definitions, questions and even basic concepts. The available health care content of the 3 surveys focus on access to different types of health services, contact with different categories of health professionals, unmet health needs and the use of preventive services. Many important dimensions of health care are not covered. Not all these basic indicators are available for the North or its Aboriginal populations.
A comprehensive survey of health care in the North with sufficient sample size to provide reliable estimates for its subpopulations - urban and remote, Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal, and First Nations, Inuit and Métis - would provide useful information to decision-makers and service providers. Analytical studies can also be conducted to investigate the correlations and interactions among health status, health determinants and health care and assess whether such relationships differ among the different population groups.
PubMed ID
26214103 View in PubMed
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