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Source
J Anthropol Sci. 2017 Dec 30; 95:319-327
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Dec-30-2017
Author
Jon Røyne Kyllingstad
Author Affiliation
Norsk Teknisk Museum/The Norwegian Museum of Science and Technology, Oslo, Norway, jon.kyllingstad@tekniskmuseum.no.
Source
J Anthropol Sci. 2017 Dec 30; 95:319-327
Date
Dec-30-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Anthropology
Continental Population Groups - ethnology - history
Emigration and Immigration
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Minority Groups
Norway - ethnology
Racism - ethnology - history
Science
PubMed ID
28708062 View in PubMed
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Acknowledging the past while looking to the future: conceptualizing indigenous child trauma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117696
Source
Child Welfare. 2013;92(4):55-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Shanley Swanson Nicolai
Merete Saus
Source
Child Welfare. 2013;92(4):55-74
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Cultural Characteristics
Cultural Competency
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Intergenerational Relations
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Montana
Norway
Politics
Population Groups - ethnology - psychology
Qualitative Research
Social Work - methods - standards
Stress Disorders, Traumatic - ethnology
Abstract
Trauma affects children from all ethnicities, nationalities and socioeconomic backgrounds. However, indigenous children may experience trauma differently than their majority population peers due to traumatic histories of colonization and marginalization. This article reports on an exploratory qualitative study of how service providers in Western Montana and Northern Norway conceptualize Native American and Sámi children's experiences of trauma today. Findings reveal that participants relate current trauma experiences of indigenous youth to historical and intergenerational traumas.
PubMed ID
24851475 View in PubMed
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Addressing the Duality of Access to Healthcare for Indigenous Communities: Racism and Geographical Barriers to Safe Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303179
Source
Healthc Pap. 2018 01; 17(3):6-10
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-2018
Author
Carrie Bourassa
Author Affiliation
Chair, Indigenous & Northern Health; Senior Scientist, Health Sciences North Research Institute; Scientific Director, Institute of Indigenous Peoples' Health, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Sudbury, ON.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2018 01; 17(3):6-10
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Canada
Culture
Health Services Accessibility
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Inuits
Population Groups - ethnology
Racism
Rural Population
Social Stigma
Abstract
This commentary examines the inequitable access to healthcare services that Indigenous peoples in Canada face on a daily basis. It considers not only geographical or physical access but also culturally safe access to healthcare. Racism is cited as a major deterrent in not accessing mainstream health services. Three recent studies are cited that reveal that racism, discrimination, stigma, sexism and bias prevent Indigenous peoples from accessing mainstream health services. Cultural safety training is recommended, as well as recruitment and retention of Indigenous health professionals. Several recommendations to address physical and geographical access are also recommended, including self-governance and capacity building; enhanced partnerships and collaboration to address jurisdictional issues, particularly for First Nations communities, and a national strategy for access to healthy and affordable food in northern, remote and rural communities.
PubMed ID
30052180 View in PubMed
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Approaching Etuaptmumk - introducing a consensus-based mixed method for health services research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263112
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27438
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
  1 document  
Author
Susan Chatwood
Francois Paulette
Ross Baker
Astrid Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Heidi Eriksen
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Josée Lavoie
Wendy Lou
Ian Mauro
James Orbinski
Nathalie Pabrum
Hanna Retallack
Adalsteinn Brown
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27438
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
532688
Keywords
Cold Climate
Consensus
Health Services Research/methods
Health Services, Indigenous/organization & administration
Humans
Population Groups/ethnology
Program Evaluation
Quality Control
Abstract
With the recognized need for health systems' improvements in the circumpolar and indigenous context, there has been a call to expand the research agenda across all sectors influencing wellness and to recognize academic and indigenous knowledge through the research process. Despite being recognized as a distinct body of knowledge in international forums and across indigenous groups, examples of methods and theories based on indigenous knowledge are not well documented in academic texts or peer-reviewed literature on health systems. This paper describes the use of a consensus-based, mixed method with indigenous knowledge by an experienced group of researchers and indigenous knowledge holders who collaborated on a study that explored indigenous values underlying health systems stewardship. The method is built on the principles of Etuaptmumk or two-eyed seeing, which aim to respond to and resolve the inherent conflicts between indigenous ways of knowing and the scientific inquiry that informs the evidence base in health care. Mixed methods' frameworks appear to provide a framing suitable for research questions that require data from indigenous knowledge sources and western knowledge. The nominal consensus method, as a western paradigm, was found to be responsive to embedding of indigenous knowledge and allowed space to express multiple perspectives and reach consensus on the question at hand. Further utilization and critical evaluation of this mixed methodology with indigenous knowledge are required.
PubMed ID
26004427 View in PubMed
Documents
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Barriers, supports, and effective interventions for uptake of human papillomavirus- and other vaccines within global and Canadian Indigenous peoples: a systematic review protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296896
Source
Syst Rev. 2018 03 02; 7(1):40
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
03-02-2018
Author
Kelly J Mrklas
Shannon MacDonald
Melissa A Shea-Budgell
Nancy Bedingfield
Heather Ganshorn
Sarah Glaze
Lea Bill
Bonnie Healy
Chyloe Healy
Juliet Guichon
Amy Colquhoun
Christopher Bell
Ruth Richardson
Rita Henderson
James Kellner
Cheryl Barnabe
Robert A Bednarczyk
Angeline Letendre
Gregg S Nelson
Author Affiliation
Research Innovation and Analytics, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Syst Rev. 2018 03 02; 7(1):40
Date
03-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Canada
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Papillomavirus Infections - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Population Groups - ethnology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control
Vaccination
Abstract
Despite the existence of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines with demonstrated safety and effectiveness and funded HPV vaccination programs, coverage rates are persistently lower and cervical cancer burden higher among Canadian Indigenous peoples. Barriers and supports to HPV vaccination in Indigenous peoples have not been systematically documented, nor have interventions to increase uptake in this population. This protocol aims to appraise the literature in Canadian and global Indigenous peoples, relating to documented barriers and supports to vaccination and interventions to increase acceptability/uptake or reduce hesitancy of vaccination. Although HPV vaccination is the primary focus, we anticipate only a small number of relevant studies to emerge from the search and will, therefore, employ a broad search strategy to capture literature related to both HPV vaccination and vaccination in general in global Indigenous peoples.
Eligible studies will include global Indigenous peoples and discuss barriers or supports and/or interventions to improve uptake or to reduce hesitancy, for the HPV vaccine and/or other vaccines. Primary outcomes are documented barriers or supports or interventions. All study designs meeting inclusion criteria will be considered, without restricting by language, location, or data type. We will use an a priori search strategy, comprised of key words and controlled vocabulary terms, developed in consultation with an academic librarian, and reviewed by a second academic librarian using the PRESS checklist. We will search several electronic databases from date of inception, without restrictions. A pre-defined group of global Indigenous websites will be reviewed for relevant gray literature. Bibliographic searches will be conducted for all included studies to identify relevant reviews. Data analysis will include an inductive, qualitative, thematic synthesis and a quantitative analysis of measured barriers and supports, as well as a descriptive synthesis and quantitative summary of measures for interventions.
To our knowledge, this study will contribute the first systematic review of documented barriers, supports, and interventions for vaccination in general and for HPV vaccination. The results of this study are expected to inform future research, policies, programs, and community-driven initiatives to enhance acceptability and uptake of HPV vaccination among Indigenous peoples.
PROSPERO Registration Number: CRD42017048844.
PubMed ID
29499749 View in PubMed
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Cardiac procedures among American Indians and Alaska Natives compared to non-Hispanic whites hospitalized with ischemic heart disease in California.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145781
Source
J Gen Intern Med. 2010 May;25(5):430-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Stacey Jolly
Chi Kao
Andrew B Bindman
Carol Korenbrot
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, CA, USA. jollys@ccf.org
Source
J Gen Intern Med. 2010 May;25(5):430-4
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska - ethnology
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - utilization
California - ethnology
Cardiac Catheterization - utilization
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - utilization
Coronary Artery Bypass - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
European Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Female
Hispanic Americans - ethnology
Hospitalization
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - ethnology - therapy
Population Groups - ethnology
Abstract
American Indians/Alaska Natives (AIAN) experience a high burden of cardiovascular disease with rates for fatal and nonfatal heart disease approximately twofold higher than the U.S. population.
To determine if disparities exist in cardiac procedure rates among AIAN compared to non-Hispanic whites hospitalized in California for ischemic heart disease defined as acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina.
Cross-sectional study. EVENTS: A total of 796 ischemic heart disease hospitalizations among AIAN and 90971 among non-Hispanic whites in 37 of 58 counties in California from 1998-2002.
Cardiac catheterization, percutaneous cardiac intervention, and coronary artery bypass graft surgery procedure rates from hospitalization administrative data.
AIAN did not have lower cardiac procedure rates for cardiac catheterization and percutaneous cardiac intervention compared to non-Hispanic whites (unadjusted OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.87-1.16 and OR 1.04, 95% CI 0.90-1.20, respectively). Adjustment for age, sex, comorbidities, and payer source did not alter the results (adjusted OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.82-1.10 and OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.85-1.14, respectively). We found higher odds (unadjusted OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.09-1.70) for receipt of coronary artery bypass graft surgery among AIAN hospitalized for ischemic heart disease compared to non-Hispanic whites which after adjustment attenuated some and was no longer statistically significant (adjusted OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.00-1.58).
AIAN were not less likely to receive cardiac procedures as non-Hispanic whites during hospitalizations for ischemic heart disease. Additional research is needed to determine whether differences in specialty referral patterns, patients' treatment preferences, or outpatient management may explain some of the health disparities due to cardiovascular disease that is found among AIAN.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20107917 View in PubMed
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Characteristic of actual food at elderly and senile aged population of Yakutia

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270953
Source
Wiad Lek. 2015;68(4):508-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
V. Neustroeva
E. Kylbanova
G. Simonova
O. Tatarinova
L. Scherbakova
Source
Wiad Lek. 2015;68(4):508-11
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Diet - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Eating - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Population Groups - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Russia - ethnology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To conduct estimation of actual food among in digenous and arrived population of Yakutia of elderly and senile ages.
In the work results of epidemiological research with analysis of actual food of the population of Yakutia at the age of 60 years and over are presented. On the basis of a list of candidates with use of random selection a representative sample of men and women of Yakutsk at the age of 60 years and more has been generated. In total 775 foreheads were surveyed, the middle age has made 75.7 ± 9.4 years. For the analysis of actual food 575 people (244 men and 331 women) have been included. Among the surveyed there were 244 respondents of the in digenous population (the Yakuts) and 331 arrived respondents (the Russians, the Ukrainians, the Byelorussians, the Poles, the Germans, the Jews). The estimation of actual food is conducted by means of a frequency questionnaire.
High content of general fat, sated fat acids, polyunsaturated fat acids and refined sugar due to low consumption of general carbohydrates is revealed. At the analysis of food package of the indigenous population in comparison with the newly arrived some distinctions in consumption of following products are revealed: fresh, tinned and frozen vegetables, potatoes, eggs, horsemeat, venison, koumiss, fresh fruit and berries, oil and fats, bean, juice and drinks, sugar, chocolate and confectionery products.
daily food intake of the indigenous population of elderly and senile ages is notable for lower daily caloric content, greater general fat, SFA, less consumption of refined sugar on the background of significantly lower content of general carbohydrates, starch and food proteins. In diets at theYakuts there is considerably lower consumption of fresh and tinned vegetables, potatoes, eggs, fresh fruit and berries, bean, nuts, sugar, chocolate and confectionery products and higher consumption of meat products (horsemeat, venison), oil and fats.
PubMed ID
26887122 View in PubMed
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CONTRIBUTION OF CEREBRAL VASCULAR ANOMALIES IN HEMORRHAGIC STROKE STRUCTURE IN DIFFERENT RACIAL GROUPS OF YAKUTIA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270935
Source
Wiad Lek. 2015;68(4):604-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
S A Chugunova
T Y Nikolaeva
A. Semenov
Source
Wiad Lek. 2015;68(4):604-7
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Cerebral Hemorrhage - epidemiology - ethnology
European Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology - ethnology
Sex Factors
Stroke - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
Hemorrhagic stroke (HS) has higher incidence in Asian population compared to Caucasian. The reason for this phenomenon is not clearly understood.
To investigate the contribution of cerebral vascular anomalies in hemorrhagic stroke structurein different racial groups of Yakutia.
The study group included 1078 consecutively hospitalized patients with acute HS. A comparative analysis of demographic data and frequency of CVA, which were identified as a cause of HS, was carried out between the group of indigenous patients of Asian race and the group of Caucasian patients.
The proportion of hemorrhage due to rupture of cerebralarterial aneurysms (CAA) in the hospital HS structure was higher in Asians, compared to Caucasians (p = 0.001; OR = 1.7; 95% CL: 1.2-2.4). No difference in the arteriovenous malformations' (AVM) frequency was found between groups (p = 0.345), as well as in age and gender distribution (p = 0.052 and p = 0.759, respectively). The CAA frequency was higher among female patients compared to male in both racial groups (p
PubMed ID
26887148 View in PubMed
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Demographic risk factors of pulmonary colonization by non-tuberculous mycobacteria.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146747
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2010 Jan;14(1):106-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
E. Hernández-Garduño
R K Elwood
Author Affiliation
Division of TB Control, British Columbia Centre for Disease Control and Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. eduardo.hernandez@bccdc.ca
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2010 Jan;14(1):106-12
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Continental Population Groups - ethnology
Databases, Factual
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous - epidemiology - ethnology - microbiology
Mycobacterium avium Complex - isolation & purification
Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Infection - epidemiology - ethnology - microbiology
Nontuberculous Mycobacteria - isolation & purification
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
British Columbia (BC), Canada.
To determine the risk factors for pulmonary colonization by non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM).
Retrospective study of subjects colonized by NTM from 1990 to 2006. Subjects without mycobacterial disease and with at least three negative cultures served as controls.
Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) species were the most common NTM. Risk factors of colonization included age > or = 60 years (aOR 2.3), female sex (aOR 1.2), residency in Canada for at least 10 years (aOR 3.8), Canadian-born aboriginal (aOR 1.8), and Canadian-born non-aboriginal (aOR 1.4). Predictors of MAC colonization included White race (aOR 1.6) and residency in Canada for at least 10 years, which was the strongest predictor (aOR 6.7). Aboriginal origin was associated with non-MAC colonization (aOR 1.8), and Canadian-born people from the East/South-East Asian ethnic groups were protected from MAC colonization (aOR 0.2), all aOR P
PubMed ID
20003703 View in PubMed
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DESCRIPTION OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE IN DIFFERENT ETHNIC GROUPS, LIVING IN THE NORTH.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270936
Source
Wiad Lek. 2015;68(4):600-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
L G Chibyeva
O P Balanova
N N Vasilev
Source
Wiad Lek. 2015;68(4):600-3
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gastroesophageal Reflux - diagnosis - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
INTRODUCTIOD: Over the past 15 years, the relative frequency of detection of erosive form of GERD has increased from 3,1 to 16%. Manifestations of GERD in different ethnic populations of Yakutia are not well understood.
Studying kliniko-endoscopic and the morfofunktsionalnykh of features of GERD in various ethnic groups living in conditions of Yakutia.
The study included 168 patients with GERD of different ethnic origins. Yakuts, Evens and Evenks, were considered as indigenous people and newcomers were all persons of other nationalities, who arrived at different times from other regions of Russia. The average age was 41.75 ± 24.73 years.
Clinical manifestations of GERD in different ethnic groups living in Yakutia. Leukoplakia of the esophagus was detected in the indigenous population are four times more likely than newcomers. With GERD associated with thyroid disorders prevalent low level of contamination of Helicobacter pylori. Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with GERD in Yakutia was higher among immigrants than among the indigenous, with a high degree of contamination of Helicobacter pylori was detected more frequently in immigrants than among the indigenous. Pathological gastroesophageal reflux during the daily pH-metry of the esophagus was detected more frequently in patients visiting than among the indigenous.
The found features of a current of GERD can be further the basis for the individualized and differentiated approaches to treatment of this disease.
PubMed ID
26887147 View in PubMed
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50 records – page 1 of 5.