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1082 records – page 1 of 109.

6-Locus HLA allele and haplotype frequencies in a population of 1075 Russians from Karelia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301335
Source
Hum Immunol. 2019 Feb; 80(2):95-96
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Yvonne Hagenlocher
Beatrix Willburger
Geoffrey A Behrens
Alexander H Schmidt
Yuri Ioffe
Jürgen Sauter
Author Affiliation
DKMS German Bone Marrow Donor Center, Tübingen, Germany.
Source
Hum Immunol. 2019 Feb; 80(2):95-96
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alleles
Gene Frequency
Genetic Loci
Genetics, Population
Genotype
HLA Antigens - genetics
Haplotypes
Humans
Population Groups
Russia - ethnology
Abstract
A total of 1075 Russians from the Russian part of Karelia were genotyped at high-resolution for the human leukocyte antigen loci HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DQB1, and -DPB1 using next generation sequencing methods. The haplotypic and allelic profiles as well as Hardy-Weinberg proportions of this population sample were evaluated. As the most frequent 6-locus haplotype, A*03:01?g?~?B*07:02?g?~?C*07:02?g?~?DRB1*15:01?g?~?DQB1*06:02?g?~?DPB1*04:01?g was identified with an estimated frequency of 3.5%. No deviation from Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium was detected at any of the loci studied. The HLA genotypic data of the population sample reported here are available publicly in the Allele Frequencies Net Database under the population name "Russia Karelia" and the identifier AFN3430.
PubMed ID
30391501 View in PubMed
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The 1000 Canadian faces of lupus: determinants of disease outcome in a large multiethnic cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151515
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Jun;36(6):1200-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Christine A Peschken
Steven J Katz
Earl Silverman
Janet E Pope
Paul R Fortin
Christian Pineau
C Douglas Smith
Hector O Arbillaga
Dafna D Gladman
Murray Urowitz
Michel Zummer
Ann Clarke
Sasha Bernatsky
Marie Hudson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba Arthritis Center, RR149-800 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1M4, Canada. cpeschken@exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Jun;36(6):1200-8
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Continental Population Groups
Female
Health status
Humans
Income
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - economics - ethnology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Social Class
Abstract
To describe disease expression and damage accrual in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and determine the influence of ethnicity and socioeconomic factors on damage accrual in a large multiethnic Canadian cohort.
Adults with SLE were enrolled in a multicenter cohort. Data on sociodemographic factors, diagnostic criteria, disease activity, autoantibodies, treatment, and damage were collected using standardized tools, and results were compared across ethnic groups. We analyzed baseline data, testing for differences in sociodemographic and clinical factors, between the different ethnic groups, in univariate analyses; significant variables from univariate analyses were included in multivariate regression models examining for differences between ethnic groups, related to damage scores.
We studied 1416 patients, including 826 Caucasians, 249 Asians, 122 Afro-Caribbeans, and 73 Aboriginals. Although the overall number of American College of Rheumatology criteria in different ethnic groups was similar, there were differences in individual manifestations and autoantibody profiles. Asian and Afro-Caribbean patients had more frequent renal involvement and more exposure to immunosuppressives. Aboriginal patients had high frequencies of antiphospholipid antibodies and high rates of comorbidity, but disease manifestations similar to Caucasians. Asian patients had the youngest age at onset and the lowest damage scores. Aboriginals had the least education and lowest incomes. The final regression model (R2=0.27) for higher damage score included older age, longer disease duration, low income, prednisone treatment, higher disease activity, and cyclophosphamide treatment.
There are differences in lupus phenotypes between ethnic populations. Although ethnicity was not found to be a significant independent predictor of damage accrual, low income was.
PubMed ID
19369456 View in PubMed
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The 2009 Nobel conference on the role of genetics in promoting suicide prevention and the mental health of the population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98540
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 2010 Jan;15(1):12-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
D. Wasserman
L. Terenius
J. Wasserman
M. Sokolowski
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, The National Prevention of Suicide and Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institute (KI), Stockholm, Sweden. Danuta.Wasserman@ki.se
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 2010 Jan;15(1):12-7
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Congresses as topic
Humans
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Mental health
Nobel Prize
Population Groups
Suicide - prevention & control
Abstract
A 3-day Nobel Conference entitled 'The role of genetics in promoting suicide prevention and the mental health of the population' was held at the Nobel Forum, Karolinska Institute (KI) in Stockholm, Sweden, during 8-10 June 2009. The conference was sponsored by the Nobel Assembly for Physiology or Medicine and organized by the National Prevention for Suicide and Mental Ill-Health and the Center for Molecular Medicine at KI. The program consisted of 19 invited presentations, covering the genetic basis of mood/psychotic disorders and substance abuse in relation to suicide, with topics ranging from cellular-molecular mechanisms to (endo)phenotypes of mental disorders at the level of the individual and populations. Here, we provide an overview based on the highlights of what was presented.
PubMed ID
20029410 View in PubMed
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2009 Pandemic influenza A H1N1 in Alaska: temporal and geographic characteristics of spread and increased risk of hospitalization among Alaska Native and Asian/Pacific Islander people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136553
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2011
Author
Jay D Wenger
Louisa J Castrodale
Dana L Bruden
James W Keck
Tammy Zulz
Michael G Bruce
Donna A Fearey
Joe McLaughlin
Debby Hurlburt
Kim Boyd Hummel
Sassa Kitka
Steve Bentley
Timothy K Thomas
Rosalyn Singleton
John T Redd
Larry Layne
James E Cheek
Thomas W Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. jdw2@cdc.gov
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Date
Jan-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Child
Child, Preschool
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Geography
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Male
Middle Aged
Pandemics
Population Groups
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Alaska Native people have suffered disproportionately from previous influenza pandemics. We evaluated 3 separate syndromic data sources to determine temporal and geographic patterns of spread of 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 (pH1N1) in Alaska, and reviewed records from persons hospitalized with pH1N1 disease in 3 areas in Alaska to characterize clinical and epidemiologic features of disease in Alaskans. A wave of pH1N1 disease swept through Alaska beginning in most areas in August or early September. In rural regions, where Alaska Native people comprise a substantial proportion of the population, disease occurred earlier than in other regions. Alaska Native people and Asian/Pacific Islanders (A/PI) were 2-4 times more likely to be hospitalized than whites. Alaska Native people and other minorities remain at high risk for early and substantial morbidity from pandemic influenza episodes. These findings should be integrated into plans for distribution and use of vaccine and antiviral agents.
PubMed ID
21342894 View in PubMed
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Abandoning "the other": statistical enumeration of Swedish Sami, 1700 to 1945 and beyond.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135562
Source
Ber Wiss. 2010 Sep;33(3):263-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Per Axelsson
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Centre for Sami Research, Umeå, Sweden. per.axelsson@cesam.umu.se
Source
Ber Wiss. 2010 Sep;33(3):263-79
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Censuses - history
Ethnic groups - history
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Population Dynamics
Population Groups - history
Sweden
Abstract
Sweden has one of the world's most eminent and exhaustive records of statistical information on its population. As early as the eighteenth century, ethnic notations were being made in parish registers throughout the country, and by the early nineteenth century a specific category for the Sami population had been added to the forms used to collect data for the Tabellverket (National Population Statistics). Beginning in 1860, the Sami were also counted in the first official census of the Swedish state. Nonetheless--and in contrast to many other countries--Sweden today lacks separate statistical information not only about its sole recognized indigenous population but also about other ethnic groups. The present paper investigates Sweden's attempts to enumerate its indigenous Sami population prior to World War II and the cessation of ethnic enumeration after the war. How have the Sami been identified and enumerated? How have statistical categories been constructed, and how have they changed over time? The aim of this essay is not to assess the validity of the demographic sources. Instead the paper will explore the historical, social, and cultural factors that have had a bearing on how a dominant administrative structure has dealt with the statistical construct of an indigenous population.
PubMed ID
21466142 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal community alcohol harm reduction policy (ACAHRP) project: a vision for the future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159852
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2007;42(12-13):1851-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Louis Gliksman
Margaret Rylett
Ronald R Douglas
Author Affiliation
Social, Prevention & Health Policy Research Department, Centre for Addiction & Mental Health, London, Ontario M5S 2S1, Canada. louis_gliksman@camh.net
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2007;42(12-13):1851-66
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Harm Reduction
Health Policy
Health Surveys
Humans
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Ownership
Population Groups
Abstract
Four First Nation communities in Ontario, Canada, formulated alcohol management policies between 1992 and 1994. An alcohol management policy is a local control option to manage alcohol use in recreation and leisure areas. Survey results indicate that decreases in alcohol use-related problems related to intoxication, nuisance behaviors, criminal activity, liquor license violations, and personal harm were perceived to have occurred. Furthermore, having policy regulations in place did not have an adverse effect on facility rentals. Band administrators and facility staff in each community felt the policy had had a positive effect on events at which alcohol was sold or served.
PubMed ID
18075913 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal participation in the DOVE study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80691
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Jul-Aug;97(4):305-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ralph-Campbell Kelli
Pohar Sheri L
Guirguis Lisa M
Toth Ellen L
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Jul-Aug;97(4):305-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Consumer Participation
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups
Practice Guidelines
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Abstract
OBJECTIVE/BACKGROUND: Aboriginals constitute a substantial portion of the population of Northern Alberta. Determinants such as poverty and education can compound health-care accessibility barriers experienced by Aboriginals compared to non-Aboriginals. A diabetes care enhancement study involved the collection of baseline and follow-up data on Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal patients with known type 2 diabetes in two rural communities in Northern Alberta. Analyses were conducted to determine any demographic or clinical differences existing between Aboriginals and non-Aboriginals. METHODS: 394 diabetes patients were recruited from the Peace and Keeweetinok Lakes health regions. 354 self-reported whether or not they were Aboriginal; a total of 94 self-reported being Aboriginal. Baseline and follow-up data were collected through interviews, standardized physical assessments, laboratory testing and self-reporting questionnaires (RAND-12 and HUI3). RESULTS: Aboriginals were younger, with longer duration of diabetes, more likely to be female, and less likely to have completed high school. At baseline, self-reported health status was uniformly worse, but the differences disappeared with adjustments for sociodemographic confounders, except for perceived mental health status. Aboriginals considered their mental health status to be worse than non-Aboriginals at baseline. Some aspects of health utilization were also different. DISCUSSION: While demographics were different and some utilization differences existed, overall this analysis demonstrates that "Aboriginality" does not contribute to diabetes outcomes when adjusted for appropriate variables.
PubMed ID
16967751 View in PubMed
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Aboveground and belowground legacies of native Sami land use on boreal forest in northern Sweden 100 years after abandonment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104173
Source
Ecology. 2014 Apr;95(4):963-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Grégoire T Freschet
Lars Ostlund
Emilie Kichenin
David A Wardle
Source
Ecology. 2014 Apr;95(4):963-77
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Ecosystem
Environment
Environmental monitoring
Human Activities
Humans
Population Groups
Soil
Sweden
Time Factors
Trees - physiology
Abstract
Human activities that involve land-use change often cause major transformations to community and ecosystem properties both aboveground and belowground, and when land use is abandoned, these modifications can persist for extended periods. However, the mechanisms responsible for rapid recovery vs. long-term maintenance of ecosystem changes following abandonment remain poorly understood. Here, we examined the long-term ecological effects of two remote former settlements, regularly visited for -300 years by reindeer-herding Sami and abandoned -100 years ago, within an old-growth boreal forest that is considered one of the most pristine regions in northern Scandinavia. These human legacies were assessed through measurements of abiotic and biotic soil properties and vegetation characteristics at the settlement sites and at varying distances from them. Low-intensity land use by Sami is characterized by the transfer of organic matter towards the settlements by humans and reindeer herds, compaction of soil through trampling, disappearance of understory vegetation, and selective cutting of pine trees for fuel and construction. As a consequence, we found a shift towards early successional plant species and a threefold increase in soil microbial activity and nutrient availability close to the settlements relative to away from them. These changes in soil fertility and vegetation contributed to 83% greater total vegetation productivity, 35% greater plant biomass, and 23% and 16% greater concentrations of foliar N and P nearer the settlements, leading to a greater quantity and quality of litter inputs. Because decomposer activity was also 40% greater towards the settlements, soil organic matter cycling and nutrient availability were further increased, leading to likely positive feedbacks between the aboveground and belowground components resulting from historic land use. Although not all of the activities typical of Sami have left visible residual traces on the ecosystem after 100 years, their low-intensity but long-term land use at settlement sites has triggered a rejuvenation of the ecosystem that is still present. Our data demonstrates that aboveground-belowground interactions strongly control ecosystem responses to historical human land use and that medium- to long-term consequences of even low-intensity human activities must be better accounted for if we are to predict and manage ecosystems succession following land-use abandonment.
PubMed ID
24933815 View in PubMed
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Source
J Anthropol Sci. 2017 Dec 30; 95:319-327
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Dec-30-2017
Author
Jon Røyne Kyllingstad
Author Affiliation
Norsk Teknisk Museum/The Norwegian Museum of Science and Technology, Oslo, Norway, jon.kyllingstad@tekniskmuseum.no.
Source
J Anthropol Sci. 2017 Dec 30; 95:319-327
Date
Dec-30-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Anthropology
Continental Population Groups - ethnology - history
Emigration and Immigration
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Minority Groups
Norway - ethnology
Racism - ethnology - history
Science
PubMed ID
28708062 View in PubMed
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Abusive head trauma among children in Alaska: a population-based assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107670
Source
Pages 472-479 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):472-479
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Jared Parrish
Cathy Baldwin-Johnson
Margaret Volz
Yvonne Goldsmith
Author Affiliation
MCH-Epidemiology Unit, Alaska Division of Public Health, Anchorage, AK, USA. jwp22@live.unc.edu
Source
Pages 472-479 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):472-479
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alaska - epidemiology
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Child Abuse - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Maternal Age
Young Adult
Abstract
Serious physical abuse resulting in a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been implicated as an underreported cause of infant mortality. Nearly 80% of all abusive head trauma (AHT) occurs among children
Notes
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PubMed ID
23986886 View in PubMed
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