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Disinfection and removal of human pathogenic bacteria in arctic waste stabilization ponds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297766
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32881-32893
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Yannan Huang
Lisbeth Truelstrup Hansen
Colin M Ragush
Rob C Jamieson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Water Resources Studies, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, B3H 4R2, Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32881-32893
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Bacteria
Disinfection - methods
Environmental Biomarkers
Escherichia coli
Feces - microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes
Nunavut
Ponds - microbiology
Salmonella
Seasons
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - microbiology
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Wastewater stabilization ponds (WSPs) are commonly used to treat municipal wastewater in Arctic Canada. The biological treatment in the WSPs is strongly influenced by climatic conditions. Currently, there is limited information about the removal of fecal and pathogenic bacteria during the short cool summer treatment season. With relevance to public health, the objectives of this paper were to determine if treatment in arctic WSPs resulted in the disinfection (i.e., removal of fecal indicator bacteria, Escherichia coli) and removal of selected human bacterial pathogens from the treated effluent. The treatment performance, with focus on microbial removal, was assessed for the one-cell WSP in Pond Inlet (Nunavut [NU]) and two-cell WSP in Clyde River (NU) over three consecutive (2012-2014) summer treatment seasons (late June-early September). The WSPs provided a primary disinfection treatment of the wastewater with a 2-3 Log removal of generic indicator E. coli. The bacterial pathogens Salmonella spp., pathogenic E. coli, and Listeria monocytogenes, but not Campylobacter spp. and Helicobacter pylori, were detected in the untreated and treated wastewater, indicating that human pathogens were not reliably removed. Seasonal and annual variations in temperature significantly (p 
PubMed ID
28353112 View in PubMed
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Mixed-species biofilms cultured from an oil sand tailings pond can biomineralize metals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259105
Source
Microb Ecol. 2014 Jul;68(1):70-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Susanne Golby
Howard Ceri
Lyriam L R Marques
Raymond J Turner
Source
Microb Ecol. 2014 Jul;68(1):70-80
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Bacteria - drug effects - growth & development
Biodegradation, Environmental
Biofilms - drug effects - growth & development
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Industrial Waste
Metals - metabolism
Petroleum
Ponds - microbiology
Rhodococcus - drug effects - growth & development
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sewage - microbiology
Abstract
Here, we used an in vitro biofilm approach to study metal resistance and/or tolerance of mixed-species biofilms grown from an oil sand tailings pond in northern Alberta, Canada. Metals can be inhibitory to microbial hydrocarbon degradation. If microorganisms are exposed to metal concentrations above their resistance levels, metabolic activities and hydrocarbon degradation can be slowed significantly, if not inhibited completely. For this reason, bioremediation strategies may be most effective if metal-resistant microorganisms are used. Viability was measured after exposure to a range of concentrations of ions of Cu, Ag, Pb, Ni, Zn, V, Cr, and Sr. Mixed-species biofilms were found to be extremely metal resistant; up to 20 mg/L of Pb, 16 mg/L of Zn, 1,000 mg/L of Sr, and 3.2 mg/L of Ni. Metal mineralization was observed by visualization with scanning electron microscopy with metal crystals of Cu, Ag, Pb, and Sr exuding from the biofilms. Following metal exposure, the mixed-species biofilms were analyzed by molecular methods and were found to maintain high levels of species complexity. A single species isolated from the community (Rhodococcus erythropolis) was used as a comparison against the mixed-community biofilm and was seen to be much less tolerant to metal stress than the community and did not biomineralize the metals.
PubMed ID
24281733 View in PubMed
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[Relations between Bacterioplankton, Heterotrophic Nanoflagellates, and Virioplankton in the Littoral Zone of a LarRe Plain Reservoir:. ImDact of Bird Colonies.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289529
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2016 Sep; 85(5):588-597
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
K V Rumyantseva
N G Kosolapova
D B Kosolapov
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2016 Sep; 85(5):588-597
Date
Sep-2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacteria - growth & development - virology
Bacterial Load
Cell Count
Charadriiformes - physiology
Dinoflagellida - growth & development - microbiology - virology
Ecosystem
Food chain
Heterotrophic Processes - physiology
Plankton - growth & development - microbiology - virology
Ponds - microbiology - virology
Russia
Viruses - growth & development
Abstract
Interactions of the main components of microbial planktonic food web (bacteria, heterotrophic nanoflagellates, and viruses) were studied in a protected overgrown littoral zone of the Rybinsk Reservoir (Upper Volga).. The effect of bird colonial, settlements (the Laridae family) on these processes was deter- mined. The following systems exhibited significant negative correlations: "heterotrophic nanoflagellates- large rod-shaped bacteria" ("predator-prey"), "viruses-bacteriophages-bacterial products" ("parasite-. host") and "heterotrophic nanoflagellates-viruses-bacteriophages." Relations between biotic factors con- trolling bacterial development were more pronounced outside the zone affected by colonial bird settlements. Near the bird colony the role of viruses in mortality of planktonic bacteria increased. Reproduction of bacte- rial cells accelerated in response to the increase in feeding activity of heterotrophic nanoflagellates. Viruses- bacteriophages and heterotrophic nanoflagellates probably eliminate different targets until medium-sized cells become predominant in the bacterial community. Then heterotrophic nanoflagellates consume bacterial cells infected with viruses.
PubMed ID
29364606 View in PubMed
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[Relations between Bacterioplankton, Heterotrophic Nanoflagellates, and Virioplankton in the Littoral Zone of a LarRe Plain Reservoir:. ImDact of Bird Colonies.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289687
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2016 Sep; 85(5):588-597
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
K V Rumyantseva
N G Kosolapova
D B Kosolapov
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2016 Sep; 85(5):588-597
Date
Sep-2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacteria - growth & development - virology
Bacterial Load
Cell Count
Charadriiformes - physiology
Dinoflagellida - growth & development - microbiology - virology
Ecosystem
Food chain
Heterotrophic Processes - physiology
Plankton - growth & development - microbiology - virology
Ponds - microbiology - virology
Russia
Viruses - growth & development
Abstract
Interactions of the main components of microbial planktonic food web (bacteria, heterotrophic nanoflagellates, and viruses) were studied in a protected overgrown littoral zone of the Rybinsk Reservoir (Upper Volga).. The effect of bird colonial, settlements (the Laridae family) on these processes was deter- mined. The following systems exhibited significant negative correlations: "heterotrophic nanoflagellates- large rod-shaped bacteria" ("predator-prey"), "viruses-bacteriophages-bacterial products" ("parasite-. host") and "heterotrophic nanoflagellates-viruses-bacteriophages." Relations between biotic factors con- trolling bacterial development were more pronounced outside the zone affected by colonial bird settlements. Near the bird colony the role of viruses in mortality of planktonic bacteria increased. Reproduction of bacte- rial cells accelerated in response to the increase in feeding activity of heterotrophic nanoflagellates. Viruses- bacteriophages and heterotrophic nanoflagellates probably eliminate different targets until medium-sized cells become predominant in the bacterial community. Then heterotrophic nanoflagellates consume bacterial cells infected with viruses.
PubMed ID
29364606 View in PubMed
Less detail