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Adenomas and hyperplastic polyps in screening studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24936
Source
World J Surg. 1991 Jan-Feb;15(1):7-13
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Bech
O. Kronborg
C. Fenger
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
World J Surg. 1991 Jan-Feb;15(1):7-13
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma - diagnosis - epidemiology
Aged
Colonic Polyps - diagnosis - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Denmark
Female
Humans
Intestinal Polyps - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Occult Blood
Prospective Studies
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
A survey is given of colorectal polyps detected in a prospective randomized screening study with the fecal occult blood test. It is demonstrated that colonoscopy in persons with positive Hemoccult-II tests results in detection of and removal of a higher number of adenomas than among controls. The strategy may, therefore, possibly be followed by a reduction of the incidence of colorectal cancer. Screen-detected adenomas were most often in males and were larger than among controls; they were most often in the sigmoid colon, whereas the rectum was the most frequent location for adenomas in controls. Eight percent of persons with screen-detected adenomas had some symptoms, which could be referred to adenomas, in contrast to 50% among controls. Hyperplastic polyps served as markers for adenomas in persons with positive Hemoccult-II as well as in controls with adenomas detected by colonoscopy; however, most persons with adenomas had no hyperplastic polyps. Endoscopic polypectomy did not result in any severe complications, but surgical removal in 2 of 22 patients proved fatal. The results presented are compared with those of other prospective randomized trials. The optimistic view--that the incidence of cancer may be reduced by polypectomy in persons with positive Hemoccult-II tests--stresses the importance of securing optimal colonoscopy service.
PubMed ID
1994609 View in PubMed
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The appropriateness of surveillance colonoscopy intervals after polypectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116614
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Jan;27(1):33-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Eline Schreuders
Jerome Sint Nicolaas
Vincent de Jonge
Harmke van Kooten
Isaac Soo
Daniel Sadowski
Clarence Wong
Monique E van Leerdam
Ernst J Kuipers
Sander J O Veldhuyzen van Zanten
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastronenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. elineschreuders@gmail.com
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Jan;27(1):33-8
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma - diagnosis - pathology - surgery
Aged
Canada
Colonic Polyps - diagnosis - pathology - surgery
Colonoscopy - methods - standards
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control
Female
Gastroenterology - standards
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
Adherence to surveillance colonoscopy guidelines is important to prevent colorectal cancer (CRC) and unnecessary workload.
To evaluate how well Canadian gastroenterologists adhere to colonoscopy surveillance guidelines after adenoma removal or treatment for CRC.
Patients with a history of adenomas or CRC who had surveillance performed between October 2008 and October 2010 were retrospectively included. Time intervals between index colonoscopy and surveillance were compared with the 2008 guideline recommendations of the American Gastroenterological Association and regarded as appropriate when the surveillance interval was within six months of the recommended time interval.
A total of 265 patients were included (52% men; mean age 58 years). Among patients with a normal index colonoscopy (n=110), 42% received surveillance on time, 38% too early (median difference = 1.2 years too early) and 20% too late (median difference = 1.0 year too late). Among patients with nonadvanced adenomas at index (n=96), 25% underwent surveillance on time, 61% too early (median difference = 1.85) and 14% too late (median difference = 1.1). Among patients with advanced neoplasia at index (n=59), 29% underwent surveillance on time, 34% too early (median difference = 1.86) and 37% later than recommended (median difference = 1.61). No significant difference in adenoma detection rates was observed when too early surveillance versus appropriate surveillance (34% versus 33%; P=0.92) and too late surveillance versus appropriate surveillance (21% versus 33%; P=0.11) were compared.
Only a minority of surveillance colonoscopies were performed according to guideline recommendations. Deviation from the guidelines did not improve the adenoma detection rate. Interventions aimed at improving adherence to surveillance guidelines are needed.
Notes
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Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 Dec 30;329(27):1977-818247072
Cites: Gastrointest Endosc. 2005 Mar;61(3):378-8415758907
Cites: Gastrointest Endosc. 2006 Jan;63(1):97-10316377324
Cites: Gastrointest Endosc. 2006 Apr;63(4):546-5716564851
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2006 Jun;20(6):411-2316779459
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Cites: Endoscopy. 2011 Jul;43(7):560-7221437854
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2012 Feb;26(2):79-8422312606
PubMed ID
23378981 View in PubMed
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Assessing polyp size by improved digitalized computed tomography (CT).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85618
Source
Anticancer Res. 2008 May-Jun;28(3B):1911-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Suzuki Chikako
Matsson Lars
Rubio Carlos A
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institution for Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Anticancer Res. 2008 May-Jun;28(3B):1911-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Intestinal Polyps - diagnosis - pathology
Phantoms, Imaging
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - instrumentation - methods
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The size of colorectal polyps is important in the clinical management of these lesions. When using a conventional ruler (the tool of pathologists worldwide), we have previously found unacceptably high intra- and inter-observer variations in assessing the size of phantom polyps. The aim of this study was to assess the size of 12 phantom polyps by computed tomography (CT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The size of phantom polyps as assessed by CT was compared to the gold standard size (GSS) measured at The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. RESULTS: In 33.3% (n=4) of the 12 polyps and in 41.7% (n=25) of the 60 measurements, the mean CT size under- or overestimated the GSS by more than 1 mm. In 15%, or in 9 of the 60 measurements, the CT size was under- or overestimated by more than 2 mm. In polyp #5 the GSS size was 8.41 mm where the expected cancer-risk in adenomas is 1%. But 3 out of 5 CT measurements were >10 mm, where the expected cancer-risk in adenomas is 10%. In polyp #10 the GSS size was 10.20 mm where the expected cancer-risk is 10%. But 2 out of 5 CT measurements were
PubMed ID
18630480 View in PubMed
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The association between location, age and advanced colorectal adenoma characteristics: a propensity-matched analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285738
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2017 Jan;52(1):1-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Hans-Christian Pommergaard
Jakob Burcharth
Jacob Rosenberg
Hans Raskov
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2017 Jan;52(1):1-4
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma - diagnosis - pathology
Adult
Aged
Colonic Polyps - diagnosis - pathology
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - pathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - diagnosis
Propensity Score
Risk factors
Sigmoidoscopy
Abstract
Evidence supports an association between certain colorectal adenoma characteristics and predisposition to cancer. The association between anatomical location of colorectal adenoma, age and advanced adenomas needs attention. The objective of this study was to evaluate the possible association between occurrence of sporadic advanced adenomas with location and age.
A cross-sectional study using baseline data from index colonoscopy from a randomized controlled trial evaluating chemopreventive treatment against recurrence of colorectal adenomas was performed. Inclusion criteria for patients were one adenoma of >1?cm in diameter or multiple adenomas of any size, or an adenoma of any size and familial disposition for colorectal cancer. Multivariate regression and propensity score-matched analyses were used to correlate location of adenomas and age with advanced adenoma features.
In this study, 2149 adenomas were removed in 1215 patients. Advanced colorectal adenomas primarily occurred in the anal part of the colon. Older age was associated with more adenomas and more oral occurrence of adenomas, as well as a higher risk of advanced adenomas. Surprisingly, specifically for the oral adenomas the risk of advanced adenoma seems to be lower for older patients compared with younger.
This study presents new results with regard to association between age, location of adenomas and risk of advanced adenomas. The results indicate that sigmoidoscopy for screening purposes may be obsolete, and add to the existing literature on which future guidelines for screening may be based.
PubMed ID
27686516 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2007 Oct;(106):1-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
K. Tran
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2007 Oct;(106):1-4
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Capsule Endoscopes - contraindications
Capsule Endoscopy - adverse effects - contraindications - methods
Colon - pathology
Colonoscopy - methods
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis
Device Approval
Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal - economics - methods
Equipment Design
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - diagnosis
Intestinal Diseases - diagnosis
Intestinal Neoplasms - diagnosis
Intestinal Polyps - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Occult Blood
Sensitivity and specificity
Telemetry - instrumentation
Time Factors
Video Recording - economics - instrumentation
Abstract
(1) The PillCam Colon capsule is an ingestible miniature camera that captures images of the colon's inner lining. (2) There is limited evidence on the use of this technology in imaging the colon. Two small, methodologically flawed pilot studies found that for patients with positive findings (i.e., abnormalities detected), the rates of detection with the PillCam Colon capsule were similar to those obtained with conventional colonoscopy. (3) No serious adverse events were reported in the pilot studies, although some patients had delayed excretion of the capsule. (4) A challenge for clinicians using this technology will be the time required to read the large quantity of video images produced. Further enhancements to the software system used to view the images may address this issue.
PubMed ID
17957839 View in PubMed
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Clinical course of patients with primary nasal polyps.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15947
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1994 Sep;114(5):556-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
K. Larsen
M. Tos
Author Affiliation
ENT Clinic, Jernbanegade Esbjerg, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1994 Sep;114(5):556-9
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aerosols
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Beclomethasone - administration & dosage
Budesonide
Child
Combined Modality Therapy
Denmark
Female
Fluocinolone Acetonide - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nasal Polyps - diagnosis - etiology - surgery
Pregnenediones - administration & dosage
Recurrence
Abstract
A follow-up study on 180 patients treated for the first time for nasal polyps was performed. The follow-up period was from 1 to 8 years with a median of 57 months. The majority of patients had postoperative topical steroid treatment. 65.6% of patients had one polypectomy, 17.8% had two polypectomies, 10% had 3, 2.8% had 4, and 3.9% of patients had 5-10 polypectomies performed during the follow-up period. Patients without asthma, acute recurrent or chronic sinusitis, acetylsalicylic acid intolerance, or allergy had fewer polypectomies and less topical steroid treatment than patients with these characteristics. The recurrence profile between the first and second polypectomy described with the life-table method showed a slow decline in the number of patients with only one polypectomy. The time span needed before significant clinical symptoms occurred after the first polypectomy indicates that not all primary polyp patients are prone to recurrence. Nasal polyps is probably a manifestation of different clinical and aetio-pathogenetic entities. Further identification of such entities is needed to improve treatment strategy.
PubMed ID
7825441 View in PubMed
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Clinical relevance of nasal polyps in individuals recruited from a general population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15194
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2004 Jan;124(1):77-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
L. Johansson
A. Brämerson
K. Holmberg
I. Melén
A. Akerlund
M. Bende
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Central Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2004 Jan;124(1):77-81
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aspirin - adverse effects
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Inspiratory Capacity - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Nasal Mucosa - pathology
Nasal Obstruction - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Nasal Polyps - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Olfaction Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Taste Threshold - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare the clinical presentations of individuals with nasal polyps detected by endoscopy in a general population sample with those of patients with nasal polyp disease seeking medical attention. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 38 individuals with nasal polyps from a population-based sample were compared with 38 matched controls and a third group consisting of 44 patients who presented to an outpatient clinic with symptoms and diagnosed nasal polyps Upper and lower airway symptoms were registered. Polyp size, peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF), olfactory function and health-related quality of life were measured. RESULTS: Compared with the individuals with nasal polyps in the population sample, patients actively seeking medical care for nasal polyposis experienced more symptoms of nasal blockage and an impaired sense of smell, and had more extensive polyps and reduced PNIF. There were equal frequencies of asthma symptoms in these two groups. Compared with the controls, the individuals with nasal polyps in the population sample had a greater frequency of asthma symptoms and aspirin intolerance and also experienced an impaired sense of smell. CONCLUSION: Nasal polyps alone, as seen occasionally, are indicative of airway disease involving the upper and lower respiratory tracts.
PubMed ID
14977082 View in PubMed
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Colonoscopy in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25941
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol Suppl. 1988;149:43-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
J. Mosvold
M. Osnes
A. Serck-Hanssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Ullevål Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol Suppl. 1988;149:43-9
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Colonic Polyps - diagnosis
Colonoscopy
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Risk factors
Abstract
Many studies show that colonoscopy is the most accurate method available in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer. Furthermore, in some cases it makes it possible to treat malignant polyps adequately by simple polypectomy. Endoscopic removal of adenomas plays an important role in prevention of colorectal malignancies. It has also been shown that there is a high rate of synchronous premalignant and malignant lesions.
PubMed ID
3264413 View in PubMed
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Colonoscopy procedures at a small rural hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176947
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2004;9(2):89-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Erle Kirby
Author Affiliation
Lady Dunn General Hospital, Wawa, Ontario.
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2004;9(2):89-93
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cecum
Colonic Neoplasms - diagnosis
Colonic Polyps - diagnosis
Colonoscopy - adverse effects
Family Practice
Hospitals, Rural
Humans
Intubation, Gastrointestinal
Middle Aged
Ontario
Retrospective Studies
Safety
Abstract
Screening for colon cancer by colonoscopy is increasingly recommended in the medical literature. There are few, if any, reports in the medical literature regarding the provision of colonoscopy services in small rural hospitals by non-specialist endoscopists.
This study, carried out in a small rural hospital in northern Ontario, tracks the development of a colonoscopy service provided by a general practitioner with some basic colonoscopy training. It compares the GP's past and present level of expertise with literature-derived benchmarks and gauges the safety and effectiveness of the procedure.
A retrospective chart review of 616 colonoscopies performed by this GP between April 1992 and September 2003.
The results of the study support the idea that colonoscopy in a rural setting can be provided safely and effectively.
Colonoscopy has a high safety profile when provided by general practitioners, and training in the procedure should be available to interested family practitioners and family practice residents.
PubMed ID
15603681 View in PubMed
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Colorectal cancer screening in women: an underutilized lifesaver.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137684
Source
AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2011 Feb;196(2):303-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Lisa L Chu
Stefanie Weinstein
Judy Yee
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 4150 Clement St., San Francisco, CA 94121, USA.
Source
AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2011 Feb;196(2):303-10
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - diagnosis - prevention & control - secondary
Adenoma - diagnosis - prevention & control
Advisory Committees
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Colonic Polyps - diagnosis - prevention & control
Colonography, Computed Tomographic - economics - methods
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Early Detection of Cancer - economics - utilization
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Lipoma - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Reimbursement Mechanisms
United States - epidemiology
Women's health
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) represents the third most common cancer diagnosed and a major cause of cancer-related deaths in women. Despite strong evidence that early screening decreases colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates, colorectal cancer screening rates in women still lag significantly behind screening rates for breast and cervical cancers. Additionally, women have been found to be less likely than men to undergo CRC screening. This is despite the fact that the overall lifetime risk for the development of colorectal carcinoma is similar in both sexes. Barriers to screening have been found to be different for women compared with men. Screening adherence in women also appears to be associated with various social and demographic factors.
CT colonography (CTC) is an accurate, minimally invasive, and well-tolerated examination that is newly endorsed by the American Cancer Society, U.S. Multisociety Task Force, and the American College of Radiology. Improved screening compliance may occur in women with further dissemination of CTC.
PubMed ID
21257880 View in PubMed
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46 records – page 1 of 5.