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18S rDNA polymerase chain reaction and sequencing in onychomycosis diagnostics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82167
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2006;86(3):223-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Walberg Mette
Mørk Cato
Sandven Per
Jorde Anne Tomine
Bjørås Magnar
Gaustad Peter
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medical Microbiology, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, NO0027 Oslo, Norway. mette.walberg@labmed.uio.no
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2006;86(3):223-6
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Fungal - analysis
DNA, Ribosomal - analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Onychomycosis - diagnosis - microbiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Predictive value of tests
Trichophyton - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
Diagnostic approaches to onychomycosis have traditionally been based on a combination of culture and microscopy. In the present study clinical specimens from 346 patients with suspected onychomycosis were analysed by 18S polymerase chain reaction (detection) followed by sequencing and subsequent database search (identification) in parallel with routine culture on agar (detection and identification). In 49 samples Trichophyton rubrum was identified by culture and sequencing. In 67 additional culture negative samples, a positive dermatophyte sequence was obtained (T. rubrum in 54, T. mentagrophytes in 5, and T. species in 8 samples). Fifteen samples cultured positive while no sequence was obtained. Two hundred and seven samples were negative by culture as well as by sequencing. Nails from 10 healthy controls were negative by culture and sequencing. In conclusion, the number of specimens that were positive by polymerase chain reaction was more than double the number that were positive by culture alone.
PubMed ID
16710579 View in PubMed
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Abeta oligomer-mediated long-term potentiation impairment involves protein phosphatase 1-dependent mechanisms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162439
Source
J Neurosci. 2007 Jul 18;27(29):7648-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-18-2007
Author
Marlen Knobloch
Mélissa Farinelli
Uwe Konietzko
Roger M Nitsch
Isabelle M Mansuy
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry Research, University of Zurich, 8008 Zurich, Switzerland.
Source
J Neurosci. 2007 Jul 18;27(29):7648-53
Date
Jul-18-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases - genetics
Amyloid beta-Peptides - chemistry - metabolism - ultrastructure
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2
Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases - genetics
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Electric Stimulation - methods
Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials - drug effects - physiology
Gene Expression Regulation - genetics
Hippocampus - cytology
Humans
Long-Term Potentiation - genetics - physiology - radiation effects
Mice
Mice, Transgenic
Microscopy, Electron, Transmission - methods
Neurons - drug effects - physiology
Patch-Clamp Techniques
Phosphoprotein Phosphatases - physiology
Presenilin-1 - genetics
Protein Phosphatase 1
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Abstract
Amyloid beta (Abeta) oligomers are derived from proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and can impair memory and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in vivo and in vitro. They are recognized as the primary neurotoxic agents in Alzheimer's disease. The mechanisms underlying such toxicity on synaptic functions are complex and not fully understood. Here, we provide the first evidence that these mechanisms involve protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). Using a novel transgenic mouse model expressing human APP with the Swedish and Arctic mutations that render Abeta more prone to form oligomers (arcAbeta mice), we show that the LTP impairment induced by Abeta oligomers can be fully reversed by PP1 inhibition in vitro. We further demonstrate that the genetic inhibition of endogenous PP1 in vivo confers resistance to Abeta oligomer-mediated toxicity and preserves LTP. Overall, these results reveal that PP1 is a key player in the mechanisms of AD pathology.
PubMed ID
17634359 View in PubMed
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Altered expression of E-cadherin in breast cancer. patterns, mechanisms and clinical significance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20400
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2000 Jun;36(9):1098-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
K S Asgeirsson
J G J¿onasson
L. Tryggvad¿ottir
K. Olafsd¿ottir
J R Sigurgeirsd¿ottir
S. Ingvarsson
H M Ogmundsd¿ottir
Author Affiliation
Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory, Icelandic Cancer Society, PO Box 5420, Reykjav¿ik, Iceland.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2000 Jun;36(9):1098-106
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - genetics - metabolism
Cadherins - metabolism
DNA, Neoplasm - genetics
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Loss of Heterozygosity - genetics
Microsatellite Repeats - genetics
Middle Aged
Mutation - genetics
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Proteins - metabolism
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - metabolism
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Reduced cell adhesion brought about by altered surface expression of E-cadherin has been implicated in invasive and metastatic malignant growth. We investigated the patterns of immunohistochemical E-cadherin expression in 120 breast carcinomas. Furthermore, we analysed DNA from the same samples for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) using three separate microsatellite markers on chromosome 16q22.1. Finally, the clinical outcome was ascertained for 108 patients. 19% (18/97) of infiltrating ductal carcinomas showed complete loss of E-cadherin expression compared with 64% (9/14) of infiltrating lobular carcinomas. LOH was detected in 46% (24/52) of infiltrating ductal carcinomas and 89% (8/9) of infiltrating lobular carcinomas. In the infiltrating lobular carcinomas, LOH was associated with complete loss of cell membrane expression of E-cadherin, although a cytoplasmic expression pattern was evident. In contrast, this association was not seen in the infiltrating ductal carcinomas. In a multivariate analysis, loss of E-cadherin expression was shown to be a significant independent risk factor for a poorer disease-free survival (P=0.019), in particular in the node-negative subset of patients (P=0.029). Significance was also approached for breast cancer corrected survival (P=0.056). We conclude that different mechanisms are involved in the altered E-cadherin expression seen in different subtypes of breast carcinomas. Furthermore, we implicate loss of E-cadherin, regardless of the genetic causes, as an independent prognostic marker for disease recurrence, especially in node-negative breast cancer patients, irrespective of the histological type.
PubMed ID
10854942 View in PubMed
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[A method for differential cytolysis in the molecular genetic expert identification of material evidence: problems in optimizing the procedure].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213534
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 1996 Jan-Mar;39(1):16-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
L I Gyské
P L Ivanov
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 1996 Jan-Mar;39(1):16-21
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cell Fractionation - methods
DNA - analysis - isolation & purification
Electrophoresis, Agar Gel
Expert Testimony - methods - standards
Forensic Medicine - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Russia
Spermatozoa - chemistry - ultrastructure
Abstract
The authors discuss the problem of selective derivation of the genetic material of spermatozoa for molecular genetic identification from mixed biological traces containing sperm on material evidence. Possible methods of improving the efficacy of differential lysis of cells present in mixed traces are analyzed. Effects of some routinely used extractants on biological substrata, most often contaminating the sperm in expert material, have been studied, and conditions for their most complete elimination from objects of investigation optimized.
PubMed ID
8669057 View in PubMed
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[A molecular genetic analysis of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in families at high risk from different regions of Ukraine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33908
Source
Tsitol Genet. 1997 Nov-Dec;31(6):75-81
Publication Type
Article
Author
A Iu Ekshiian
L A Livshits
A M Bychkova
N A Afanas'eva
I R Bariliak
Source
Tsitol Genet. 1997 Nov-Dec;31(6):75-81
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Chimera - genetics
DNA - genetics - isolation & purification
DNA Primers
Electrophoresis, Agar Gel
English Abstract
Exons - genetics
Gene Deletion
Heterozygote
Homozygote
Humans
Molecular Biology
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Spinal Muscular Atrophies of Childhood - genetics
Ukraine
Abstract
The results of DNA analysis of deletion in exons 7 and 8 of SMN gene, and exon 5 of NAIP gene in 24 SMA-families from Ukraine are presented. Deletions of SMN exons 7 and 8, or 7 were found in 46 (97.9%) of 47 SMA-chromosomes. A homozygous deletion of NAIP exon 5 was demonstrated in 4 (19%) of 21 SMA-families. The authors have demonstrated that in 2 SMA patients with homozygous deletion SMN exon 7 only, the remaining SMN exon 8 was a part of a chimeric CBCD41/SMN gene.
PubMed ID
9591348 View in PubMed
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Amplification and sequencing of the control regions of BK and JC virus from human urine by polymerase chain reaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8291
Source
Virology. 1991 Feb;180(2):553-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1991
Author
T. Flaegstad
A. Sundsfjord
R R Arthur
M. Pedersen
T. Traavik
S. Subramani
Author Affiliation
Virological Research Group, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Virology. 1991 Feb;180(2):553-60
Date
Feb-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
BK Virus - genetics - isolation & purification
Base Sequence
DNA, Single-Stranded - genetics
DNA, Viral - genetics
Humans
JC Virus - genetics - isolation & purification
Molecular Sequence Data
Oligonucleotide Probes
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Urine - microbiology
Abstract
The various strains of BKV and JCV exhibit a remarkable degree of heterogeneity in the noncoding region near the origin of DNA replication. It is of great interest, therefore, to characterize the naturally occurring variants as a first step towards the attainment of an understanding of the origin and the biological significance of this hypervariability. In this paper we report the use of polymerase chain reaction for amplification and sequencing of the control regions of BKV and JCV DNAs from urines of AIDS patients, bone marrow transplantation recipients, and other patient groups. Our results support the conclusion that BK(WW) and its variants constitute the most prevalent strain in the human population tested so far. A new strain, designated BK(TU), was isolated from some patients from Norway. Urine inocula containing BK(WW) gave BK(TU) after propagation in cell culture, while BK(TU) did not change the sequence of its control region during the same procedure. The JCV isolates were almost identical with several strains molecularly cloned from the urine reported by Y. Yogo, T. Kitamura, C. Sugimoto, T. Ueki, Y. Aso, K. Hara, and F. Taguchi (J. Virol., 1990, 64, 3139-3143). This archetypal strain may represent the JCV circulating in the human population, from which various regulatory sequences of JCV isolates could have evolved by deletions and amplifications.
PubMed ID
1846488 View in PubMed
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Amplification by long RT-PCR of near full-length norovirus genomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158184
Source
J Virol Methods. 2008 May;149(2):226-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Jennifer Kostela
Melissa Ayers
John Nishikawa
Lorraine McIntyre
Martin Petric
Raymond Tellier
Author Affiliation
Metabolism Research Program, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Virol Methods. 2008 May;149(2):226-30
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caliciviridae Infections - virology
Canada
Feces - virology
Genome, Viral
Humans
Molecular Epidemiology - methods
Molecular Sequence Data
Norovirus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Phylogeny
RNA, Viral - genetics
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Sequence Alignment
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
A long RT-PCR method was developed to amplify the norovirus genome. Starting from RNA extracted directly from clinical samples and using broadly reactive primers, it can generate near full-length amplicons that allow for easy determination of the near complete genomic sequence. Two norovirus isolates from Toronto, Canada, in 2002 and 2005 were sequenced. This approach will facilitate molecular epidemiology studies of noroviruses.
PubMed ID
18355931 View in PubMed
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Anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV positive people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7431
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2001 Oct;77(5):327-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
F. Martin
M. Bower
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, Fulham Road, London SW10 9NH, UK.
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2001 Oct;77(5):327-31
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active
Anus Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - virology
Carcinoma in Situ - epidemiology - pathology - virology
Female
HIV Seropositivity
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Incidence
Male
Papillomavirus, Human - genetics
Papovaviridae Infections - complications - pathology
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Tumor Virus Infections - complications - pathology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature on HIV associated anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN). METHODS: A comprehensive Medline/Pubmed search was performed for the years 1980-2001 (January) for articles pertaining to HIV associated anal intraepithelial neoplasia. From the MeSH terms "anal intraepithelial neoplasia" and "anal cancer" the following subheadings were used: HIV, homosexual men, HPV, Epidemiology, Etiology, Mortality, Diagnosis, Screening, Drug Therapy, Surgical Therapy, Radio Therapy, Risk factors, ASIL. The search was limited to "human" for all searches. In the absence of enough "randomised controlled trials" the search was extended to clinical trials, reviews, and case reports. One analysis on cost effectiveness and two abstracts presented at 12th World AIDS Conference and 6th Conference on Retrovirus and Opportunistic Infections were included. The 44 publications referred to originate from the United Kingdom (9), the United States (26), and Denmark (5), with one each from Switzerland, Germany, Australia, and France. The Cochrane Database of systematic reviews yielded 11 complete reviews for "anal cancer" and none for "anal intraepithelial neoplasia." The textbook of AIDS-related cancers and their treatment was consulted. We also included our personal experience from the treatment of patients at the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, one of the largest centres for the management of HIV disease in Europe. CONCLUSION: Routine anal cytological screening followed by appropriate management of AIN is an important issue for HIV infected patients. The natural history of AIN has not been fully established and this prevents clinicians from defining clear management protocols. There is early evidence that the benefits of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in terms of restoring immune function and reducing opportunistic infections and some neoplasms may not extend to regression of AIN. Under these circumstances it might be predicted that AIN and subsequent progression to invasive anal cancer would rise as HAART prolongs the lives of seropositive people. However, routine anal cytological screening will surely have to await an effective proved intervention for AIN and this would seem to be a pressing clinical goal.
PubMed ID
11588276 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of microsatellite DNA of rainbow trout (Parasalmo (Oncorhynchus) mykiss) of Kamchatka: selection of loci and optimization of the method].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100463
Source
Genetika. 2010 Jul;46(7):1004-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
A V Semenova
G A Rubtsova
K I Afanas'ev
S D Pavlov
Source
Genetika. 2010 Jul;46(7):1004-8
Date
Jul-2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Genetic Loci - genetics
Genetic Markers - genetics
Microsatellite Repeats - genetics
Oncorhynchus mykiss - genetics
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods - standards
Siberia
Abstract
The variation of a sample of rainbow trout (Parasalmo (Oncorhynchus) mykiss) from natural populations of several rivers of the Kamchatka Peninsula with respect to 43 microsatellite DNA loci has been studied. These loci were earlier used for analysis of Asian populations of closely related salmonids. Ten of them may be regarded as markers and seen promising for further studies on intraspecific relationships of rainbow trout of Kamchatka. Their use in studies on more numerous samples from different localities and populations of Parasalmo (O.) mykiss in the Asian part of the species range will ensure efficient population genetic analysis of the Kamchatka population group of this species.
PubMed ID
20795506 View in PubMed
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449 records – page 1 of 45.