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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Age at occupational exposure to combustion products and lung cancer risk among men in Stockholm, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277350
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2016 Feb;89(2):271-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Matteo Bottai
Jenny Selander
Göran Pershagen
Per Gustavsson
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2016 Feb;89(2):271-5
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - toxicity
Case-Control Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Particulate Matter - toxicity
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - toxicity
Radon - toxicity
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Occupational exposure to combustion products rich in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and particles is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. This study aimed to evaluate whether the risk depended on the age at which the individuals were exposed.
Data from 1042 lung cancer cases and 2364 frequency-matched population controls selected from all men aged 40-75 years residing in Stockholm County, Sweden, at any time between 1985 and 1990, included detailed questionnaire information on occupational, residential, and smoking history. Occupational exposures were assessed by an occupational hygienist, and exposure to air pollution from road traffic was estimated based on dispersion models.
We found that individuals exposed to combustion products in their twenties were at higher risk than those never exposed (adjusted OR = 1.46; 95% CI 1.02, 2.10). The association was still evident after adjusting for a number of potential confounders, including lifetime cumulative exposure and latency. No clear association was found in those exposed at older ages.
Exposure to combustion products at a young age was associated with elevated risk of lung cancer. Exposure-reduction programs should be aware of the susceptibility of the younger employees.
PubMed ID
26126736 View in PubMed
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Biomedicine. Do airborne particles induce heritable mutations?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180111
Source
Science. 2004 May 14;304(5673):971-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-14-2004
Author
Jonathan M Samet
David M DeMarini
Heinrich V Malling
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. jsamet@jhsph.edu
Source
Science. 2004 May 14;304(5673):971-2
Date
May-14-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Animals
DNA Damage
Female
Filtration - instrumentation
Germ-Line Mutation
Humans
Industry
Male
Mice
Mutagens - toxicity
Ontario
Particle Size
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - toxicity
Pregnancy
Spermatogonia - drug effects - physiology
Stem Cells - drug effects - physiology
Tandem Repeat Sequences
Notes
Comment On: Science. 2004 May 14;304(5673):1008-1015143280
PubMed ID
15143266 View in PubMed
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Cell size dependence of additive versus synergetic effects of UV radiation and PAHs on oceanic phytoplankton.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101847
Source
Environ Pollut. 2011 May;159(5):1307-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Pedro Echeveste
Susana Agustí
Jordi Dachs
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Change Research, IMEDEA (CSIC-UIB) Instituto Mediterráneo de Estudios Avanzados, Miquel Marqués 21, 07190 Esporles, Illes Balears, Spain. pecheveste@imedea.uib-csic.es
Source
Environ Pollut. 2011 May;159(5):1307-16
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aquatic Organisms - cytology - drug effects - radiation effects
Atlantic Ocean
Mediterranean Sea
Phytoplankton - cytology - drug effects - radiation effects
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - toxicity
Ultraviolet Rays
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons' (PAHs) toxicity is enhanced by the presence of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), which levels have arisen due to the thinning of the ozone layer. In this study, PAHs' phototoxicity for natural marine phytoplankton was tested. Different concentrations of a mixture of 16 PAHs were added to natural phytoplankton communities from the Mediterranean Sea, Atlantic, Arctic and Southern Oceans and exposed to natural sunlight received in situ, including treatments where the UVR bands were removed. PAHs' toxicity was observed for all the phytoplankton groups studied in all the waters and treatments tested, but only for the pico-sized group a synergetic effect of the mixture and UVR was observed (p=0.009). When comparing phototoxicity in phytoplankton from oligotrophic and eutrophic waters, synergy was only observed at the oligotrophic communities (p=0.02) where pico-sized phytoplankton dominated. The degree of sensitivity was related to the trophic degree, decreasing as Chlorophyll a concentration increased.
PubMed ID
21330023 View in PubMed
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Dietary benzo(a)pyrene intake during pregnancy and birth weight: associations modified by vitamin C intakes in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107027
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Oct;60:217-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Talita Duarte-Salles
Michelle A Mendez
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jan Alexander
Margaretha Haugen
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: duartesallest@fellows.iarc.fr.
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Oct;60:217-23
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ascorbic Acid - pharmacology
Benzo(a)pyrene - administration & dosage - analysis - toxicity
Birth Weight - drug effects
Child
Cohort Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fetal Development - drug effects
Food - classification
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Heredodegenerative Disorders, Nervous System - chemically induced
Humans
Infant
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Microphthalmos - chemically induced
Multivariate Analysis
Mutagenicity Tests
Norway - epidemiology
Parity
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - toxicity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Abstract
Maternal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) during pregnancy has been associated with reduced fetal growth. However, the role of diet, the main source of PAH exposure among non-smokers, remains uncertain.
To assess associations between maternal exposure to dietary intake of the genotoxic PAH benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] during pregnancy and birth weight, exploring potential effect modification by dietary intakes of vitamins C, E and A, hypothesized to influence PAH metabolism.
This study included 50,651 women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Dietary B(a)P and nutrient intakes were estimated based on total consumption obtained from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and estimated based on food composition data. Data on infant birth weight were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (MBRN). Multivariate regression was used to assess associations between dietary B(a)P and birth weight, evaluating potential interactions with candidate nutrients.
The multivariate-adjusted coefficient (95%CI) for birth weight associated with maternal energy-adjusted B(a)P intake was -20.5g (-31.1, -10.0) in women in the third compared with the first tertile of B(a)P intake. Results were similar after excluding smokers. Significant interactions were found between elevated intakes of vitamin C (>85mg/day) and dietary B(a)P during pregnancy for birth weight (P
PubMed ID
24071023 View in PubMed
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Impact of oil-sands based wetlands on the growth of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9290
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2005 Feb;24(2):457-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Kirsty E Gurney
Tony D Williams
Judit E Smits
Mark Wayland
Suzanne Trudeau
Leah I Bendell-Young
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser, University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6, Canada.
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2005 Feb;24(2):457-63
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Canada
Comparative Study
Ducks
Glycerol - blood - metabolism
Oils - toxicity
Organ Size
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - toxicity
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Soil Pollutants - toxicity
Triglycerides - blood - metabolism
Abstract
Identifying the potential effects of industrially formed wetlands on waterfowl populations is important for assessing the suitability of such wetlands in industrial reclamation strategies. Mallard ducklings were held in situ on two industrially formed wetlands and one reference wetland in northern Alberta, Canada. Duckling mass and skeletal size were measured at regular intervals over 33 d, and blood was collected to investigate the analysis of plasma metabolites (triglyceride and glycerol) as an indicator of physiological condition. In repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), multivariate ANOVA, and subsequent multiple-comparisons tests, body mass and skeletal size were significantly lower in ducklings maintained on the industrial wetland after 2, 5, 9, and 13 d of exposure. In this situation, plasma metabolite analysis did not provide additional information on mass-independent condition. We conclude that if the observed differences in growth and size translate into a decreased survival of juvenile waterfowl inhabiting these wetlands, then populations of these birds in the area could be negatively affected. We emphasize the importance of field-based ecological research in toxicological studies of wildlife.
PubMed ID
15720008 View in PubMed
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Lung cancer and mesothelioma among engine room crew--case reports with risk assessment of previous and ongoing exposure to carcinogens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93427
Source
Int Marit Health. 2007;58(1-4):5-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Forsell Karl
Hageberg S.
Nilsson Ralph
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Sahlgrenska, Goeteborg, Sweden. karl.forsell@amm.gu.se
Source
Int Marit Health. 2007;58(1-4):5-13
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Asbestos - toxicity
Carcinogens - toxicity
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced
Male
Men's health
Mesothelioma - chemically induced
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Occupational Exposure
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - toxicity
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Ships
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article is to illustrate, by means of case reports on occupational exposure in four men with cancer, the hazards of previous and ongoing carcinogenic exposures in ships' engine rooms. Several cases of cancer occurred within a few years among the engine room crew of a passenger ferry. An investigation was undertaken to establish the number of cases, the types of cancers involved, and their possible relation to work. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Nine cases of cancer among crew members of the ferry were reported between 2001 and 2006, six of which occurred in crew working in the engine room. During the investigated time period, 65 men had been employed in the engine room (mean age 40, range 16-65, years). Four cases were referred to our department. Medical history, personal risk factors and specific diagnoses were collected by medical examinations and from the medical files. An experienced occupational hygienist evaluated work-related exposure to carcinogens. RESULTS: Two engine room ratings contracted lung cancer at the age of 54 and 61, respectively. Both men had been smokers for many years (33 and 45 years, respectively). One engine room rating and one electrical engineer were diagnosed with mesothelioma at the age of 61 and 63, respectively. All four had started to work in engine rooms between 1959 and 1967. Carcinogenic exposure included asbestos, with an estimated cumulative exposure of 2-5 fibreyears/mL, as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitroarenes from oils, soot and engine exhaust. CONCLUSIONS: For the lung cancer cases, smoking and asbestos exposure were considered clear risk factors, and PAHs and nitroarenes possible risk factors. For the mesothelioma cases, former asbestos exposure was considered a causal factor. Asbestos can still be present on ships. Steps should be taken to reduce the exposure to asbestos, PAHs and nitroarenes, and smoking.
PubMed ID
18350972 View in PubMed
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Phototoxicity of oil sands-derived polycyclic aromatic compounds to Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79166
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2006 Dec;25(12):3266-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Farwell Andrea J
Nero Vincent
Croft Melanie
Rhodes Spencer
Dixon D George
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. afarwell@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2006 Dec;25(12):3266-74
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Oils - toxicity
Oryzias - embryology - growth & development
Photochemistry
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - toxicity
Silicon Dioxide - toxicity
Skull - abnormalities - drug effects
Abstract
Alkylated polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs), which are rich in dibenzothiophenes, are present in natural and reclaimed aquatic environments in the oil sands region of northern Alberta (Canada). An oil sands-derived PAC extract has been shown to induce signs of blue sac disease in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos. Information regarding exposure to and effects of oil sands PACs is available, but little of this information concerns the impact of modifying factors. The present study focuses on the effect of simulated solar radiation on oil sands-derived PAC toxicity to Japanese medaka embryos. Photomodification of the oil sands PAC extract caused reduced toxicity with an increase in the duration of ultraviolet (UV) exposure. Generally, mortality and developmental endpoints and, to a lesser extent, growth were affected by photomodification. Coexposures of the PAC mixture and UV caused slight increases in toxicity for mortality and embryonic developmental endpoints at the longest duration of UV exposure tested (16 h). Based on the modest phototoxicity of the oil sands PAC extract to Japanese medaka embryos, enhanced toxicity associated with UV irradiation may not be a concern for embryos of fish species that are common to the oil sands region. However, testing the effects of differing levels of UV irradiation on larval fish and invertebrates that may differ in their PAC bioaccumulation would improve our understanding concerning the importance of UV irradiation as a modifying factor in oil sands environmental risk assessment.
PubMed ID
17220098 View in PubMed
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Plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E in female populations from Poland, Serbia and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146646
Source
Environ Int. 2010 Feb;36(2):188-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Michael Tekle
Jolanta Gromadzinska
Gordana Joksic
Ruza Antic
Robert Nilsson
Gustav Dallner
Anna-Lena Undén
Kerstin Brismar
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, The Arrhenius Laboratories, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. michael.tekle@dbb.su.se
Source
Environ Int. 2010 Feb;36(2):188-94
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Female
Food - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 1 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Middle Aged
Poland
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - toxicity
Serbia
Sweden
Ubiquinone - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin E - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Exposure to environmental contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), life style and nutritional status of a population are important factors that may influence normal serum levels of antioxidants and the insulin-like growth factor system. In this study we examined serum levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1(IGFBP-1), coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) and vitamin E in healthy female populations (n=4 x 100) aged 19-59 years from Poland (PL), Sweden (SE), Serbia I (SR I) and Serbia II (SR II). The last group lived in an environmental emergency area affected by the bombings of 1999 in Serbia. The Polish and SR I cohorts exhibited low IGFSD-score levels, (-2 to +/-0), compared to females from SE with IGFSD-score 0. In the SR II population, the IGFSD range was between -1 and 1. The IGFBP-1 levels of the Polish and SR I groups were lower than in the Swedish population, while the SR II levels showed a broader distribution, 20-80 microg/l. The CoQ values in the Swedish and Polish samples were around 1 nmol/ml. In contrast, the SR I cohorts exhibited higher concentrations, 1.5-3.5 nmol/ml and the SR II group had extremely low levels,
PubMed ID
20015549 View in PubMed
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Regulation of promoter-CAT stress genes in HepG2 cells by suspensions of particles from ambient air.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207473
Source
Fundam Appl Toxicol. 1997 Sep;39(1):18-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
R. Vincent
P. Goegan
G. Johnson
J R Brook
P. Kumarathasan
L. Bouthillier
R T Burnett
Author Affiliation
Health Protection Branch, Health Canada, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. RenaudvVincent@inet.hwc.ca
Source
Fundam Appl Toxicol. 1997 Sep;39(1):18-32
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Animals
Benzo(a)pyrene - toxicity
Blotting, Western
Cadmium Compounds - toxicity
Cell Line - drug effects
Chloramphenicol O-Acetyltransferase - biosynthesis - chemistry - genetics
Copper Sulfate - toxicity
Dust - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - standards
Enzyme Induction
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic - drug effects - genetics
Humans
Metals - toxicity
Ontario
Particle Size
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - toxicity
Promoter Regions, Genetic - genetics
Regression Analysis
Sulfates - toxicity
Transcription, Genetic - drug effects
Transcriptional Activation
Urban health
Abstract
A panel of HepG2-derived cell lines (CAT-Tox [L] assay, Xenometrix), harboring stress genes consisting of a sequence for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) under the transcriptional regulation from mammalian promoters and response elements, was exposed for 18-24 hr to aqueous suspensions of urban dusts (SRM-1648, SRM-1649, EHC-93) or PM2.5 particles (particulate matter
PubMed ID
9325024 View in PubMed
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Screening of PAHs and DDTs in sand and acrisols soil by a rapid solid-phase microalgal bioassay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163539
Source
Ecotoxicology. 2007 Jul;16(5):429-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
M K Chung
R. Hu
K C Cheung
M H Wong
Author Affiliation
Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, P.R. China.
Source
Ecotoxicology. 2007 Jul;16(5):429-38
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biodegradation, Environmental
DDT - toxicity
Environmental monitoring
Eukaryota - chemistry - drug effects
Germination - drug effects
Humans
Poaceae - chemistry - drug effects - growth & development
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - toxicity
Seeds - drug effects - growth & development
Silicon Dioxide
Soil
Soil Pollutants - toxicity
Abstract
Previously we have demonstrated the rapid screening potential of a newly developed solid-phase microalgal bioassay with spiked sands. In this paper, we report further comparative results using both PAHs and DDTs spiked sands and field-collected acrisols soils. Toxicity responses obtained from standard higher plant tests with three species of plants (Lolium perenne, Cynodon dactylon and Brassica chinensis) were compared with those obtained from a cocktail of microalgae (Selenastrum capricornutum, Chlorococcum hypnosporum and the indigenous Chlorococcum meneghini). The 5-day seed germination/root elongation tests were not sensitive at all in contrast to the 4-day solid-phase microalgal tests and the 28-day early seedling growth tests in both spiked sands and contaminated soils. Sensitivities of microalgal tests were generally higher than the seedling growth tests in spiked sands. Concerning the assays with contaminated soil, the responses of microalgae and higher plants varied. However, the results demonstrated that microalgae could generally act as effective surrogates to screen xenobiotic compounds at toxic level to higher plants, with the local species C. meneghini especially sensitive to reveal phytotoxic effects. This promising rapid screening solution is possible to be used in accompany with standard seedling growth tests when assessing phytotoxicities of contaminated areas, especially for acrisols soil.
PubMed ID
17503178 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.