Skip header and navigation

Refine By

143 records – page 1 of 15.

Analysis of HO-PCBs and PCP in blood plasma from individuals with high PCB exposure living on the Chukotka Peninsula in the Russian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178566
Source
J Environ Monit. 2004 Sep;6(9):758-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Torkjel M Sandanger
Pierre Dumas
Urs Berger
Ivan C Burkow
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Air Research, The Polar Environmental Centre, 9296 Tromso, Norway. torkjel.sandanger@nilu.no
Source
J Environ Monit. 2004 Sep;6(9):758-65
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Humans
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - chemistry
Russia
Abstract
A trace analytical method is presented for the analysis of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyl metabolites (HO-PCBs) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) in human plasma. The described methodology is a modification of a previously validated method used for PCB and organochlorine pesticide analysis. The modified method enables the combined analysis of phenolic and neutral halogenated compounds. A tandem Florisil column is used for separating the HO-PCBs and PCP from the neutral fraction, instead of the more common chemical partitioning. In the same step the neutral fraction is purified for GC analysis. The extraction of the HO-PCBs and PCP was found to be highly dependent on sufficient acidification of the sample and the polarity of the extracting solvent. Analysis of plasma samples gave recovery rates for (13)C(6)-PCP and (13)C(12)-4-HO-CB 187 of 64 and 72%, respectively. The limit of detection ranged between 2-20 pg g(-1) plasma for the HO-PCBs and 5 pg g(-1) plasma for PCP. No matrix interferences were observed in the chromatograms. In plasma samples (n = 15) from the native Chukchi people in Uelen (Russian Arctic), a population with high PCB exposure, the median ratio of sum HO-PCBs to sum PCBs was as high as 0.4 and the sum HO-PCBs and PCBs were significantly correlated (r(2) > 0.7, p
PubMed ID
15346180 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of hydroxylated metabolites of PCBs (OH-PCBs) and other chlorinated phenolic compounds in whole blood from Canadian inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6761
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Jul;108(7):611-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
C D Sandau
P. Ayotte
E. Dewailly
J. Duffe
R J Norstrom
Author Affiliation
Centre for Analytical and Environmental Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Jul;108(7):611-6
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Environmental Exposure
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Humans
Hydroxylation
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In this study, we identified the main hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs) and other chlorinated phenolic compounds and we determined their relative concentrations in whole blood from 13 male and 17 female Inuit from northern Quebec, Canada, and from a pooled whole blood sample from southern Quebec. We also determined concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Total OH-PCB concentrations were variable among the Inuit samples, ranging over 2 orders of magnitude (0.117-11.6 ng/g whole blood wet weight). These concentrations were equal to and up to 70 times those found for the southern Quebec pooled whole blood sample. Geometric mean concentrations of total OH-PCBs were 1.73 and 1.01 ng/g whole blood for Inuit men and women, respectively, and 0.161 ng/g whole blood for the southern population pool. There are limited data available for comparison, but the levels of OH-PCBs in Inuit are higher than those previously reported in the literature for other populations. There was a significant correlation (p
PubMed ID
10903613 View in PubMed
Less detail

Androgen receptor gene CAG repeat length as a modifier of the association between persistent organohalogen pollutant exposure markers and semen characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77700
Source
Pharmacogenet Genomics. 2007 Jun;17(6):391-401
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Giwercman Aleksander
Rylander Lars
Rignell-Hydbom Anna
Jönsson Bo A G
Pedersen Henning S
Ludwicki Jan K
Lesovoy Vladimir
Zvyezday Valentyna
Spano Marcello
Manicardi Gian-Carlo
Bizzaro Davide
Bonefeld-Jørgensen Eva C
Toft Gunnar
Bonde Jens Peter
Giwercman Charlotte
Tiido Tarmo
Giwercman Yvonne Lundberg
Author Affiliation
Molecular Reproductive Medicine Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Reproductive Medicine Centre, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. aleksander.giwercman@med.lu.se
Source
Pharmacogenet Genomics. 2007 Jun;17(6):391-401
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
DNA Fragmentation - drug effects
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood - toxicity
Endocrine Disruptors - blood - toxicity
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Halogenated - toxicity
Male
Minisatellite Repeats
Pharmacogenetics
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - toxicity
Polymorphism, Genetic
Receptors, Androgen - genetics
Semen - drug effects - metabolism
Sperm Count
Trinucleotide Repeats
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Exposure to persistent organohalogen pollutants was suggested to impair male reproductive function. A gene-environment interaction has been proposed. No genes modifying the effect of persistent organohalogen pollutants on reproductive organs have yet been identified. We aimed to investigate whether the CAG and GGN polymorphisms in the androgen receptor gene modify the effect of persistent organohalogen pollutant exposure on human sperm characteristics. METHODS: Semen and blood from 680 men [mean (SD) age 34 (10) years] from Greenland, Sweden, Warsaw (Poland) and Kharkiv (Ukraine) were collected. Persistent organohalogen pollutant exposure was assessed by measuring serum levels of 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethene (p,p'-DDE). Semen characteristics (volume, sperm concentration, total count, proportion of progressively motile and morphology) and DNA fragmentation index (DFI) were determined. CAG and GGN repeat lengths were determined by direct sequencing of leukocyte DNA. RESULTS: A statistically significant interaction was found between the CB-153 group and CAG repeat category in relation to sperm concentration and total sperm count (P=0.03 and 0.01, respectively). For p,p'-DDE, in the European cohorts a significant interaction was found in relation to DFI (P=0.01). For CAG
PubMed ID
17502831 View in PubMed
Less detail

An exploratory study of diabetes in a First Nation community with respect to serum concentrations of p,p'-DDE and PCBs and fish consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146289
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2009 Dec;6(12):3179-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Aline Philibert
Harold Schwartz
Donna Mergler
Author Affiliation
CINBIOSE, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), Montréal, Québec, Canada. philibert.aline@uqam.ca
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2009 Dec;6(12):3179-89
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Biological Markers
Confidence Intervals
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Pollutants
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Nutritional Status
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Risk factors
Statistics as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examined the association between self-reported diabetes, fish consumption and serum levels of organochlorines in a First Nation community. One quarter of the 101 participants reported diabetes. Serum PCBs, but not p,p'-DDE, were positively correlated to consumption frequency of total fish, walleye and pike, but not trout. Reported diabetes was positively associated to p,p'-DDE and some PCB congeners. Odds Ratios (OR) for reported diabetes for those in the upper 75th percentile for serum p,p'-DDE compared to the others were 3.5 (95% CI 1-13.8) and 6.1 (95% CI 1.4-27.3) (weight wet and lipid-standardized values, respectively) and for total sum of PCBs: 4.91 (95% CI 1.4-19.0) and 5.51 (95% CI 1.3-24.1). For participants who were in the upper 50th percentile for trout and white fish intake, reported diabetes was respectively 6 and 4 times lower compared to the others. These findings support the hypothesis that environmental exposure to elevated p,p'-DDE and PCBs is associated with increased risk of diabetes. Consumption of trout and white fish may be beneficial to reduce risk.
Notes
Cites: Chemosphere. 1997 Mar-Apr;34(5-7):1459-689134679
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1997 Feb;20(2):185-79118771
Cites: Environ Res. 2005 Jul;98(3):284-30215910784
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2005 Dec 1;351-352:165-24616297438
Cites: Environ Health. 2005;4:2816316471
Cites: Diabetes Metab. 2005 Dec;31 Spec No 2:5S35-5S5216415764
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2006 Apr 15;359(1-3):101-1015913708
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2006 Jul;29(7):1638-4416801591
Cites: Metabolism. 2006 Aug;55(8):989-9516839831
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2006 Nov 1;370(2-3):452-6616959301
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Dec;84(6):1299-30717158409
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2007 Mar;30(3):744-5217327354
Cites: Hum Exp Toxicol. 2007 May;26(5):447-5217623770
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Oct;115(10):1442-717938733
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Dec;115(12):1747-5218087594
Cites: Environ Res. 2008 Feb;106(2):226-3918054906
Cites: Rev Environ Health. 2008 Jan-Mar;23(1):59-7418557598
Cites: Health Rep. 2008 Sep;19(3):59-6318847146
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2007 Nov-Dec;98(6):438-4319039878
Cites: Environ Monit Assess. 2009 Mar;150(1-4):3-1919067201
Cites: Chemosphere. 2009 May;75(5):674-919157498
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Jul;117(7):1076-8219654916
Cites: PLoS One. 2009;4(10):e750319838294
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Sep 5;163(5):561-611006768
Cites: Chronic Dis Can. 2000;21(3):128-3311082349
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2001 Jun;24(6):1099-10111375377
Cites: Environ Res. 2001 Jun;86(2):140-811437460
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2001 Apr;60(2):157-6911507965
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 Sep 13;345(11):790-711556298
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Dec;109 Suppl 6:871-611744505
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2003 Jan 20;302(1-3):27-5212526896
Cites: Health Rep. 2003 May;14(3):35-4712816014
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2003 Jul;26(7):1993-812832301
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Aug 16;362(9383):537-812932388
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2004 May;27(5):1047-5315111519
Cites: Biomarkers. 2003 Nov-Dec;8(6):529-3415195683
Cites: CMAJ. 1990 Apr 15;142(8):821-302322914
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1993 Jan;16(1):157-778123057
Cites: CMAJ. 1993 Aug 1;149(3):303-78339176
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1998 Sep;21(9):1414-319727886
PubMed ID
20049255 View in PubMed
Less detail

An investigation of the co-variation in circulating levels of a large number of environmental contaminants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123494
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2012 Sep;22(5):476-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Erik Lampa
Lars Lind
Anna Bornefalk Hermansson
Samira Salihovic
Bert van Bavel
P Monica Lind
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. erik.lampa@medsci.uu.se
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2012 Sep;22(5):476-82
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Benzhydryl Compounds
Biological Markers - blood
Child
Chlorine Compounds - blood
Cluster analysis
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Pesticides - blood
Phenols - blood
Phthalic Acids - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Principal Component Analysis
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
We are daily exposed to many different environmental contaminants. Mixtures of these contaminants could act together to induce more pronounced effects than the sum of the individual contaminants. To evaluate the effects of such mixtures, it is of importance to assess the co-variance amongst the contaminants. Thirty-seven environmental contaminants representing different classes were measured in blood samples from 1016 individuals aged 70 years. Hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to assess the co-variation among the contaminants. Within each identified cluster, possible marker contaminants were sought for. We validated our findings using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2004 study. Two large clusters could be identified, one representing low/medium chlorinated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (=6 chlorine atoms), as well as two pesticides and one representing medium/high chlorinated PCBs (=6 chlorine atoms). PCBs 118 and 153 could be used as markers for the low/medium chlorinated cluster and PCBs 170 and 209 could be used as markers for the medium/high chlorinated cluster. This pattern was similar to data from the NHANES study. Apart from the PCBs, little co-variation was seen among the contaminants. Thus, a large number of chemicals have to be measured to adequately identify mixtures of environmental contaminants.
PubMed ID
22692364 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anti-parasite treatment removes negative effects of environmental pollutants on reproduction in an Arctic seabird.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80426
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2006 Dec 22;273(1605):3117-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-22-2006
Author
Bustnes Jan O
Erikstad Kjell E
Hanssen Sveinn A
Tveraa Torkild
Folstad Ivar
Skaare Janncehe U
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, The Polar Environmental Centre, 9296 Tromsø, Norway. jan.o.bustnes@nina.no
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2006 Dec 22;273(1605):3117-22
Date
Dec-22-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anthelmintics - pharmacology
Arctic Regions
Breeding
Charadriiformes - parasitology - physiology
Chlordan - analogs & derivatives - blood
Clutch Size - drug effects
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Hexachlorobenzene - blood
Homing Behavior - drug effects
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Male
Nesting Behavior - drug effects
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Reproduction - drug effects
Abstract
Recent studies have shown that the detrimental effects of anthropogenic pollutants may be worse if organisms are exposed to natural stress. In this study, we examined whether negative effects of organochlorines (OCs) could be influenced by parasites. In two breeding seasons, we administered an anti-helminthic drug to groups of breeding glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus), whereas control groups were placebo treated. In all birds, blood residues of the most important OCs in the study population (hexachlorobenzene, oxychlordane, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene and polychlorinated biphenyl), were measured. The relationships between OCs and fitness components (i.e. nesting success and return rate between breeding seasons) were then compared between the birds receiving anti-parasite treatment and the controls. Among untreated males, higher blood residues of OCs were associated with lowered nesting success, while in males receiving anti-parasite treatment, there was no detrimental effect of OCs on fitness. Return rate was not affected by treatment or OCs. Our findings suggest that parasites may be an important factor in triggering reproductive effects of such pollutants, and that relatively low levels of OCs may have serious reproductive consequences in natural populations when stress from other sources is high.
PubMed ID
17015342 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between biomarkers of exposure to persistent organochlorine compounds (POCs).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83037
Source
Chemosphere. 2006 Jul;64(4):692-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Axmon Anna
Rignell-Hydbom Anna
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and Psychiatric Epidemiology, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden. anna.axmon@med.lu.se
Source
Chemosphere. 2006 Jul;64(4):692-4
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Humans
Male
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Sweden
Abstract
Serum concentrations of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE were assessed for 354 men and women from the Swedish Fishermen's Families Cohort, and were found to correlate very well (Pearson's r=0.72). In this particular cohort the main source of exposure to persistent organochlorine compounds are consumption of contaminated fatty fish. High correlations between total PCB/CB-153 and p,p'-DDE have also been found in other population with similar exposure, but not in populations whose major source of exposure to persistent organochlorine compounds is not necessarily through the consumption of contaminated sea food. The authors suggest that when investigating a possible relation between exposure to persistent organochlorine compounds and different health outcomes in populations with exposure similar to the Swedish Fishermen's Families Cohort, there may be no need to analyze more than either CB-153 or p,p'-DDE.
PubMed ID
16337985 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between exposure to persistent organohalogen pollutants and epididymal and accessory sex gland function: multicentre study in Inuit and European populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80475
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2006 Nov;22(4):765-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Elzanaty Saad
Rignell-Hydbom Anna
Jönsson Bo A G
Pedersen Henning S
Ludwicki Jan K
Shevets Maryna
Zvyezday Valentyna
Toft Gunnar
Bonde Jens Peter
Rylander Lars
Hagmar Lars
Bonefeld-Jorgensen Ewa
Spano Marcello
Bizzaro Davide
Manicardi Gian-Carlo
Giwercman Aleksander
Author Affiliation
Scanian Andrology Centre, Fertility Centre, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. saad.elzanaty@kmed.lu.se
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2006 Nov;22(4):765-73
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - analysis
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood - poisoning
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Pollutants - blood - poisoning
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Fisheries
Genitalia, Male - drug effects - physiology
Greenland
Humans
Inuits
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Poland
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - toxicity
Pregnancy
Prostate-Specific Antigen - analysis
Semen - chemistry - drug effects
Sperm Motility - drug effects
Ukraine
Abstract
Exposure to persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs) may have negative impact on male reproductive function. We, therefore, investigated the association between serum levels of POPs and epididymal and accessory sex gland function. Serum levels of CB-153, p,p'-DDE and seminal markers of epididymal [neutral-alpha glucosidase (NAG)], prostatic [prostate specific-antigen (PSA)] and zinc, and seminal vesicle function (fructose) were measured from 135 Swedish fishermen and fertile men from Greenland (n=163), Warsaw, Poland (n=167) and Kharkiv, Ukraine (n=158). Multiple linear regression analyses, adjusting for potential confounders, were employed using both continuous and categorized exposure variables. Both exposure and outcome variables were log transformed. Considering the consistency between models with either continuous or categorized CB-153 levels, negative associations with the activity of NAG were found among Greenlandic men (mean difference 7.0 mU/ejaculate, 95% CI 3.0, 34), and in the aggregated cohort (mean difference 4.0 mU/ejaculate, 95% CI -0.2, 8.0). A positive association was observed between CB-153 and PSA as well as zinc among Kharkiv men. In the Swedish cohort, a negative association was found between CB-153 and fructose. In conclusion, the negative effects of POP on sperm motility, observed in the same study population might partly be caused by post-testicular mechanisms, involving a decreased epididymal function.
PubMed ID
17008049 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between prenatal polychlorinated biphenyl exposure and obesity development at ages 5 and 7 y: a prospective cohort study of 656 children from the Faroe Islands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106521
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Jan;99(1):5-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Jeanett L Tang-Péronard
Berit L Heitmann
Helle R Andersen
Ulrike Steuerwald
Philippe Grandjean
Pál Weihe
Tina K Jensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark (JLT-P, HRA, PG, and TKJ); the Research Unit for Dietary Studies, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospitals, Frederiksberg, Denmark (JLT-P and BLH); the National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark (BLH); the Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, Australia (BLH); the Department of Occupational Medicine and Public Health, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands (US); and the Department of Environmental Medicine, Faroese Hospital System, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands (PW).
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Jan;99(1):5-13
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Body Weight - drug effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood - toxicity
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Maternal Exposure
Milk, human - chemistry
Obesity - chemically induced
Overweight - blood - metabolism
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - toxicity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced
Prospective Studies
Waist Circumference - drug effects
Abstract
Chemicals with endocrine-disrupting abilities may act as obesogens and interfere with the body's natural weight-control mechanisms, especially if exposure occurs during prenatal life.
We examined the association between prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and subsequent obesity at 5 and 7 y of age.
From 1997 to 2000, 656 pregnant Faroese women were recruited. PCB and DDE were measured in maternal serum and breast milk, and children's weight, height, and waist circumference (WC) were measured at clinical examinations at 5 and 7 y of age. The change in body mass index (BMI) from 5 to 7 y of age was calculated. Analyses were performed by using multiple linear regression models for girls and boys separately, taking into account maternal prepregnancy BMI.
For 7-y-old girls who had overweight mothers, PCB was associated with increased BMI (ß = 2.07, P = 0.007), and PCB and DDE were associated with an increased change in BMI from 5 to 7 y of age (PCB: ß = 1.23, P = 0.003; DDE: ß = 1.11, P = 0.008). No association was observed with BMI in girls with normal-weight mothers. PCB was associated with increased WC in girls with overweight mothers (ß = 2.48, P = 0.001) and normal-weight mothers (ß = 1.25, P = 0.04); DDE was associated with increased WC only in girls with overweight mothers (ß = 2.21, P = 0.002). No associations were observed between PCB or DDE and BMI in 5-y-old girls. For boys, no associations were observed.
Results suggest that prenatal exposure to PCB and DDE may play a role for subsequent obesity development. Girls whose mothers have a high prepregnancy BMI seem most affected.
PubMed ID
24153349 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between CB-153 and p,p'-DDE and hormone levels in serum in middle-aged and elderly men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82598
Source
Chemosphere. 2006 Oct;65(3):375-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Rylander Lars
Wallin Ewa
Jönssson Bo A G
Stridsberg Mats
Erfurth Eva Marie
Hagmar Lars
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and Psychiatric Epidemiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden.
Source
Chemosphere. 2006 Oct;65(3):375-81
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - blood
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Environmental pollutants - blood
Food Habits
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Gonadotropins - blood
Hormones - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Questionnaires
Sweden
Thyroid Hormones - blood
Thyrotropin - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Animal and epidemiologic data indicate that exposure to persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs) may disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) and the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes. We have assessed whether the POP-biomarkers 2,2'4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-ethene (p,p'-DDE) affect thyrotropin (TSH), thyroid hormones, gonadotropins or sex hormone concentrations in men. METHODS: Lipid adjusted serum concentrations of CB-153, and p,p'-DDE, were determined in 196 men (median age 59 years, range 48-82). Hormone analyses in serum were performed with immunoassays. The effect of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE (as continuous or categorized variables) were evaluated by linear regression models, adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: There was a significant positive association between p,p'-DDE and TSH. An increase of 100 ng/g lipid of p,p'-DDE corresponded to an increase of 0.03 mU/l (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.01, 0.05) in TSH level. The explanatory value (R(2)) of the multivariate model was only 7%. Moreover, there was a significant negative association between p,p'-DDE and estradiol. An increase of 100 ng/g lipid of p,p'-DDE corresponded to a decrease of 0.57 pmol/l (95% CI -1.0, -0.12) in estradiol level. The R(2)-value was only 4%. No associations were observed between any of the POP biomarkers and the other hormones. CONCLUSIONS: The positive association between p,p'-DDE and TSH and the negative association between p,p'-DDE and estradiol, among middle-aged and elderly men, were not accompanied by associations between the POP-markers and thyroxin, testosterone, and gonadotropins, respectively. The results gives some additional support for that POP exposure may affect HPT- and HPG-axes also in humans, but the overall epidemiological data are still not coherent enough to allow any firm conclusions.
PubMed ID
16554082 View in PubMed
Less detail

143 records – page 1 of 15.