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Absorption of polychlorinated biphenyls, dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans by breast-fed infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59296
Source
Chemosphere. 1995 Jun;30(12):2297-306
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
P. Dahl
G. Lindström
K. Wiberg
C. Rappe
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Chemistry, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Chemosphere. 1995 Jun;30(12):2297-306
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Benzofurans - metabolism
Body Burden
Breast Feeding
Comparative Study
Feces - chemistry
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Mass Fragmentography
Milk, human - chemistry
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Abstract
The absorption of polychlorinated biphenyls, dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans was studied in four breast-fed infants. The absorption was measured by comparing the estimated total intake and the excretion in faeces, during 48 hours, at three different time points; 1, 2 and 3 months post parta. The levels of the analysed compounds in the human milk are typical for Sweden, i.e approximately 20 ppt toxic equivalents for the dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and for the polychlorinated biphenyls approximately 16 ppt toxic equivalents. For most of the congeners the absorption is found to be over 95%. Higher excretion is noticed for heptachlorinated and octachlorinated dioxins.
PubMed ID
7620852 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue concentrations of persistent organic pollutants and the risk of prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81490
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;48(7):700-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Hardell Lennart
Andersson Swen-Olof
Carlberg Michael
Bohr Louise
van Bavel Bert
Lindström Gunilla
Björnfoth Helen
Ginman Claes
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden. lennart.hardell@orebroll.se
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;48(7):700-7
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - physiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - metabolism
Prostate-Specific Antigen - analysis
Prostatic Hyperplasia - etiology
Risk assessment
State Medicine
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We sought to study the concentrations of certain persistent organic pollutants with endocrine-disrupting properties in cases with prostate cancer and controls with benign prostate hyperplasia. METHODS: Adipose tissue was obtained from 58 cases and 20 controls. RESULTS: The median concentration among controls was used as cut-off in the statistical analysis. In the total material, a greater-than median concentration of PCB congener 153 yielded an odds ratio (OR) of 3.15 and 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.04-9.54 and one chlordane type, trans-chlordane, yielded OR 3.49 (95% CI = 1.08-11.2). In the group of case subjects with PSA levels greater than the median level of 16.5 ng/mL, PCB 153 was OR 30.3 (95% CI = 3.24-284), hexachlorobenzene OR = 9.84 (95% CI = 1.99-48.5), trans-chlordane OR = 11.0 (95% CI = 1.87-64.9), and the chlordane-type MC6 OR = 7.58 (95% CI = 1.65-34.9). The grouping of PCBs according to structural and biological activity was found to produce significantly increased risks for enzyme and phenobarbital-inducing PCBs and lower chlorinated PCBs in the case group with PSA levels greater than 16.5 ng/mL. CONCLUSIONS: These chemicals might be of etiologic significance but need to be further investigated. The biological relevance of the arbitrary cut-off point of PSA is unclear.
PubMed ID
16832227 View in PubMed
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Bioaccumulation of POPs in human breast milk from south of the Russian Far East and exposure risk to breastfed infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307579
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2020 Feb; 27(6):5951-5957
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2020
Author
Vasiliy Yu Tsygankov
Yulia P Gumovskaya
Alexandr N Gumovskiy
Maksim M Donets
Irina P Koval
Margarita D Boyarova
Author Affiliation
School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), 8 Sukhanova str., 690091, Vladivostok, Russia. tsig_90@mail.ru.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2020 Feb; 27(6):5951-5957
Date
Feb-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Bioaccumulation
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - metabolism
Far East
Female
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - metabolism
Infant
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Milk, Human - metabolism
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - metabolism
Russia
Abstract
The present study is a stage of the regular POP monitoring conducted in the framework of the Russian Federation's National Implementation Plan under the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. The POPs concentration (SHCH+SDDT+SPCB) in the samples ranged from 23 to 878 (with a mean of 151.4) ng/g lipid. The ranges of concentrations of OCPs (SHCH+SDDT) and PCBs were 2.8-291 and 3.2-720 ng/g lipid, respectively. The mean values of OCPs and PCBs amounted to 80.1 and 74.9 ng/g lipid, respectively. As suggested by the results of the EDI calculation, intake of PCBs is slightly high in infants. The fact that most studies have associated PCB with effects, such as development of congenital deformity, reduced immunity, lower weight, and small baby size at birth, makes it an alarming situation.
PubMed ID
31863377 View in PubMed
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Cardiac autonomic activity and blood pressure among Inuit children exposed to mercury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118263
Source
Neurotoxicology. 2012 Oct;33(5):1067-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Beatriz Valera
Gina Muckle
Paul Poirier
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Eric Dewailly
Author Affiliation
CHUQ Medical Research Center. Quebec, Canada.
Source
Neurotoxicology. 2012 Oct;33(5):1067-74
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autonomic Nervous System - drug effects - physiopathology
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
Epidemiological Monitoring
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - metabolism
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - ethnology
Linear Models
Male
Mercury - blood - toxicity
Nutrition Assessment
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - metabolism
Sex Factors
Abstract
Studies conducted in the Faeroe Islands and Japan suggest a negative impact of mercury on heart rate variability (HRV) among children while the results regarding blood pressure (BP) are less consistent.
To assess the impact of mercury on HRV and BP among Nunavik Inuit children.
A cohort of 226 children was followed from birth to 11 years old. Mercury concentration in cord blood and in blood and hair at 11 years old were used as markers of prenatal and childhood exposure, respectively. HRV was measured using ambulatory 2 h-Holter monitoring while BP was measured through a standardized protocol. Simple regression was used to assess the relationship of mercury to BP and HRV parameters. Multiple linear regressions were performed adjusting for covariates such as age, sex, birth weight, body mass index (BMI), height, total n-3 fatty acids, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB 153), lead, selenium and maternal smoking during pregnancy.
Median cord blood mercury and blood mercury levels at 11 years old were 81.5 nmoL/L (IQR:45.0?140.0) and 14.5 nmol/L (IQR: 7.5?28.0), respectively. After adjusting for the covariates, child blood mercury was associated with low frequency (LF) (b = 0.21, p = 0.05), the standard deviation of R?R intervals (SDNN) (b = 0.26, p = 0.02), the standard deviation of R?R intervals measured over 5 min periods (SDANN) (b = 0.31, p = 0.01) and the coefficient of variation of R?R intervals (CVRR) (b = 0.06,p = 0.02). No significant association was observed with BP.
Mercury exposure during childhood seems to affect HRV among Nunavik Inuit children at school age.
PubMed ID
23227484 View in PubMed
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Changes in concentrations of perfluorinated compounds, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, and polychlorinated biphenyls in Norwegian breast-milk during twelve months of lactation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139175
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Dec 15;44(24):9550-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2010
Author
Cathrine Thomsen
Line S Haug
Hein Stigum
May Frøshaug
Sharon L Broadwell
Georg Becher
Author Affiliation
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, NO-0403 Oslo, Norway. cathrine.thomsen@fhi.no
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Dec 15;44(24):9550-6
Date
Dec-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alkanesulfonic Acids - metabolism
Breast Feeding
Caprylates - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - metabolism
Female
Fluorocarbons - metabolism
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - metabolism
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Fluorinated - metabolism
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Milk, Human - metabolism
Mothers
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - metabolism
Abstract
At present, scientific knowledge on depuration rates of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is limited and the previous assumptions of considerable reduction of body burdens through breast-feeding have recently been challenged. We therefore studied elimination rates of important POPs in nine Norwegian primiparous mothers and one mother breast-feeding her second child by collecting breast-milk samples (n = 70) monthly from about two weeks to up to twelve months after birth. Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were determined in the breast-milk samples. Linear mixed effect models were established for selected compounds, and significant decreases in the range of 1.2-4.7% in breast-milk concentrations per month were observed for a wide range of PCBs and PBDEs. For the first time, depuration rates for perfluorooctylsulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are presented, being 3.8 and 7.8% per month, respectively (p
Notes
Erratum In: Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Apr 1;45(7):3192
PubMed ID
21090747 View in PubMed
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Comparing temporal trends of organochlorines in guillemot eggs and Baltic herring: advantages and disadvantage for selecting sentinel species for environmental monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262194
Source
Mar Environ Res. 2014 Sep;100:38-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Aroha Miller
Elisabeth Nyberg
Sara Danielsson
Suzanne Faxneld
Peter Haglund
Anders Bignert
Source
Mar Environ Res. 2014 Sep;100:38-47
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Benzofurans - metabolism
Charadriiformes - metabolism
Chromatography, Gas
Chromatography, Liquid
Dioxins - metabolism
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Fishes - metabolism
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - metabolism
Ovum - metabolism
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - metabolism
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - metabolism
Abstract
Within Europe, the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) is aimed at addressing the chemical status and quality of the marine environment. One of the main goals is to achieve Good Environmental Status (GES) in the marine environment. Environmental monitoring of biota e.g., Baltic herring and guillemot eggs, is conducted annually in Sweden to follow temporal changes in environmental contaminants. To determine the suitability of guillemot eggs as a sentinel species for investigating GES, we compared temporal trends of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) in these two species from single sampling sites within Sweden. Lipid content from guillemot eggs was consistently high and stable (yearly mean for >40 years, ~12%) compared to that of herring (yearly mean for >20 years, ~3%). A significant decreasing trend of SPCDD/F in TEQ WHO1998 was observed in guillemot eggs, but no trend was seen in herring. CB118 significantly decreased in both species, but in the last 10 years this decrease was not significant in herring. A number of advantages, such as high lipid content in the egg and a low coefficient of variation make guillemot suitable as a sentinel species. The advantages and disadvantages of using either guillemot eggs or Baltic herring are compared.
PubMed ID
24680644 View in PubMed
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Concentrations of legacy and new contaminants are related to metabolite profiles in Hudson Bay polar bears.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303135
Source
Environ Res. 2019 01; 168:364-374
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2019
Author
A D Morris
R J Letcher
M Dyck
B Chandramouli
J Cosgrove
Author Affiliation
Ecotoxicology and Wildlife Health Division, Environment and Climate Change Canada, National Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada; Department of Chemistry, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada. Electronic address: adam.morris@canada.ca.
Source
Environ Res. 2019 01; 168:364-374
Date
01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Bays
Canada
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - metabolism
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - metabolism
Male
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - metabolism
Ursidae - metabolism
Abstract
There are very few metabolomics assessments based on field accumulated, uncontrolled contaminant exposures in wildlife, particularly in the Arctic. In the present study, targeted metabolomics and contaminant data were analyzed together to assess potential influences of contaminant exposure on the hepatic metabolome of male polar bears (n?=?29) from the southern and western Hudson Bay (SHB and WHB respectively), Canada. The 29 metabolites identified as important in the differentiation of the two subpopulations after partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) included phosphatidylcholines (PCs), acylcarnitines (ACs; involved in ß-oxidation of fatty acids), and the fatty acid (FA) arachidonic acid (ARA). Perfluorinated alkyl substances, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) and some highly chlorinated ortho-polychlorinated biphenyl congeners were greater in the SHB bears and were consistently inversely correlated with discriminating ACs and PCs between the subpopulations. The concentrations of discriminatory, legacy organochlorine pesticides along with one tetrachlorobiphenyl were greater in the WHB and were directly correlated with the VIP-identified ACs and PCs. ARA, glycerophospholipid and several amino acid metabolic pathways were identified as different between subpopulations and/or were impacted. ARA is an important, conditionally essential, dietary n-6 FA and is also part of the inflammation response, and elevated concentrations in the SHB could be related to differences in chronic contaminant exposure and/or differences in diet and/or season, among a number of possible explanations. Dietary tracers (stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen) were correlated with some discriminatory metabolites, supporting the hypothesis that dietary variation was also an important factor in the differentiation of the subpopulations. The results suggest linkages between contaminant exposure in Hudson Bay polar bears and elements of the hepatic metabolome, particularly those related to lipid metabolism.
PubMed ID
30384230 View in PubMed
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Concentrations of organohalogens (PCBs, DDTs, PBDEs) in hunted and stranded Northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) in Alaska from 1992 to 2010: Links to pathology and feeding ecology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310255
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Nov 15; 691:789-798
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-15-2019
Author
John R Harley
Verena A Gill
Sunmi Lee
Kurunthachalam Kannan
Vanessa Santana
Kathy Burek-Huntington
Todd M O'Hara
Author Affiliation
Alaska Coastal Rainforest Center, University of Alaska Southeast, 11066 Auke Lake Way, Juneau, AK 99801, USA. Electronic address: john.harley@alaska.edu.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Nov 15; 691:789-798
Date
Nov-15-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
DDT - metabolism
Ecology
Environmental monitoring
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - metabolism
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - metabolism
Otters - metabolism
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical - metabolism
Abstract
Many organohalogen compounds (OHCs) are persistent organic pollutants (POPs) found in appreciable concentrations in marine predators. While production of some POPs has declined or ceased in recent decades, their capacity for global transport and bioaccumulation results in observations of unchanging or increasing concentrations in marine systems. Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) have been advocated as an environmental sentinel for contaminants due to their longevity, site fidelity and prey species that often overlap with human consumption. Using archived (1992-2010) samples of livers from Northern sea otters (n?=?50) from Alaska we examine concentrations of chlordanes (CHLs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDTs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and associated metabolites. We found some evidence for declining SPCBs over the two decades, however for most animals concentrations were low compared to toxicological thresholds. Six animals had relatively high concentrations of SPCBs (mean?=?262,000?ng/g lipid weight), SDDTs (mean?=?8,800?ng/g lw), and SPBDEs (mean?=?4,600?ng/g lw), with four of these six animals experiencing hepatic parasitism or hepatitis. In order to assess whether differences in POP concentrations are associated with feeding ecology, we examined stable isotopes of C and N in archived muscle and whisker samples. In general, there were no significant relationships between SPOP concentrations and stable isotope ratios. There were small differences in stable isotope profiles in animals with high POP concentrations, although it was unclear if these differences were due to feeding ecology or disease processes. This study highlights the importance of considering feeding ecology and necropsy (health and disease status) data while conducting contaminant surveys, and confirms some previous reports of trends in OHCs in Alaska marine mammals.
PubMed ID
31326802 View in PubMed
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Dietary exposure to methyl mercury and PCB and the associations with semen parameters among Swedish fishermen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77769
Source
Environ Health. 2007;6:14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Rignell-Hydbom Anna
Axmon Anna
Lundh Thomas
Jönsson Bo A
Tiido Tarmo
Spano Marcello
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and Psychiatric Epidemiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. Anna.Rignell-Hydbom@med.lu.se
Source
Environ Health. 2007;6:14
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Animals
Biological Markers - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Fishes
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Methylmercury Compounds - metabolism - poisoning
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - metabolism - poisoning
Semen - chemistry
Sperm Count
Sperm Motility - drug effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Dietary POP exposure have shown negative effects on sperm motility and sperm chromatin integrity, as well as an increased proportion of Y-chromosome bearing sperms. However, it has been suggested that in epidemiological studies investigating persistent organochlorine pollutant (POP)-toxicity, other pollutants occurring simultaneously may carry an increased risk of effects, which may obscure a clear interpretation of the role of POP toxicity. One such pollutant is methyl mercury (MeHg), which has been found in fatty fish from the Baltic Sea and as a consequence men with a high consumption of such fish has been found to have twice the MeHg levels compared to men with a low fish consumption. The aim of the present study was to assess if exposure to MeHg affects male reproductive function, assessed by measuring human sperm motility, sperm concentration, total sperm count, sperm chromatin integrity and the proportion of Y-chromosome bearing sperms. Secondly we also investigated a possible interaction between MeHg and 2, 2', 4, 4', 5, 5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153), a biomarker for POP exposure, with respect to sperm outcome measures. Blood and semen samples were collected from 195 Swedish fishermen with a mean age of 47 (range 24-67 years). Blood levels of MeHg ranged from 0.11 to 16.59 microg/L (median 2.25 microg/L) and serum levels of CB-153 from 37 to 1460 ng/g lipid (median 190 ng/g lipid). The analyses revealed no association between MeHg and any of the outcomes investigated. Although men with low MeHg and high CB-153 had slightly higher DNA Fragmentation Index and fraction of Y-chromosome bearing sperms than men with low levels of both compounds, the effects were not statistically significant. In conclusion, we did not find any associations between MeHg exposure and semen quality or quantity in the dose range observed neither was any synergistic effects between MeHg and CB-153 noted.
PubMed ID
17488503 View in PubMed
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31 records – page 1 of 4.