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149 records – page 1 of 15.

Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Feb 19;101(8):715
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-2004

Advantages and disadvantages of killed and live poliomyelitis vaccines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249175
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 1978;56(1):21-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
J L Melnick
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 1978;56(1):21-38
Date
1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Developing Countries
Humans
Infant
Poliomyelitis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Poliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated - standards
Poliovirus Vaccine, Oral - standards
Vaccines, Attenuated
Abstract
Decision-making on the use of poliomyelitis vaccines in the WHO Expanded Immunization Programme, and particularly in the developing nations, needs to be based on an understanding of the epidemiology of poliomyelitis in different parts of the globe. Even with two safe and effective kinds of poliomyelitis vaccine available, poliomyelitis has by no means been eradicated from the world. In developed countries that are considered well-vaccinated, certain sectors of the population may be inadequately protected against risk of infection by indigenous or imported wild polioviruses. In developing nations that are in transition toward an epidemic phase of poliomyelitis, wild polioviruses will continue to be a threat until thorough immunization is established and maintained. Killed-virus poliomyelitis vaccines have proved to be effective in certain countries that have used them exclusively; these are small countries with excellent public health systems, where coverage by the killed vaccine has been wide and frequent. Live vaccines, administered to hundreds of millions of persons during the past decade, have also been remarkably safe and effective. However, in certain warm-climate countries induction of antibodies in a satisfactorily high proportion of vaccinees has been difficult to accomplish. The advantages and disadvantages of each kind of poliomyelitis vaccine need to be weighed with respect to the particular setting in which a vaccine has been or will be used.
Notes
Cites: Am J Hyg. 1951 Nov;54(3):354-8214885155
Cites: Science. 1977 Mar 4;195(4281):834-47320661
Cites: Br Med J. 1977 Apr 16;1(6067):1012-4856397
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1967 May;85(3):469-784290523
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 1970;42(3):405-175310207
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 1972;46(3):329-364537851
PubMed ID
307445 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1966 Mar-Apr;45:5-11
Publication Type
Article
Author
O. Medin
Source
Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1966 Mar-Apr;45:5-11
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Poliomyelitis - epidemiology
Sweden
PubMed ID
5937373 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Anesthesiologic principles used in the treatment of polio patients. A great progress in intensive care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199624
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Jan 3;162(1):46-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-3-2000
Author
E K Tønnesen
Author Affiliation
Anaestesiologisk-intensiv afdeling, Arhus Universitetshospital, Arhus Kommunehospital.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Jan 3;162(1):46-7
Date
Jan-3-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology - history - trends
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
History, 20th Century
Humans
Intensive Care - history - trends
Poliomyelitis - epidemiology - history - therapy
Respiration, Artificial - history
PubMed ID
10658495 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibody status to poliomyelitis, measles, rubella, diphtheria and tetanus, Ontario, 1969-70: deficiencies discovered and remedies required.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251833
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Oct 4;113(7):619-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-4-1975
Author
D R MacLeod
W K Ing
R J Belcourt
E W Pearson
J S Bell
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Oct 4;113(7):619-23
Date
Oct-4-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies - analysis
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Diphtheria - immunology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Immunity
Immunization
Infant
Measles - immunology
Ontario
Poliomyelitis - epidemiology - immunology
Poliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated
Poliovirus Vaccine, Oral
Rubella - immunology
Tetanus - immunology
Abstract
A serologic survey was made in 15 health unit areas, testing some 5000 individuals in the age groups 4 to 6, 11 to 13, 15 to 17 and 23 to 45 years. Two types of serious deficiency were found. Only 65% of children 4 to 6 years old had antibodies to all three types of poliovirus, the antibodies being due almost entirely to immunization with Salk vaccine. Even in children who had had six or more doses only 74% had antibodies to the three types. The high percentage of students 11 to 13 and 15 to 17 years old with poliovirus antibodies can be attributed largely to natural infection and to Sabin vaccine in the mass campaign of 1962, as well as to Salk vaccine. In children who had received Sabin vaccine as well as Salk vaccine a very high level of immunity was found. The immunity of the school-age population will decline to an insufficient level unless Sabin vaccine is used after immunization with Salk vaccine. Of children 4 to 6 years old 18% had no diphtheria antitoxin and 6% had no tetanus antitoxin. Even in those who had had six or more doses of the antigens 5% had no diphtheria antitoxin and 1 to 2% had no tetanus antitoxin. This apparently refractory state is probably due to the use of unadsorbed toxoids, and it is clear that adsorbed toxoids should be used. In the adults, diphtheria antitoxin was found in only 55% and tetanus antitoxin in only 38%.
Notes
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1960 Apr;51:135-813837130
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 1972;46(2):141-94537478
Cites: Lancet. 1969 Oct 11;2(7624):792-34186037
Cites: JAMA. 1969 Aug 25;209(8):1181-55819667
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1973 Jul-Aug;64(4):398-4024354331
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1973 Aug 2;289(5):231-54351596
Cites: Infect Immun. 1974 Jul;10(1):1-54842700
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1974 Mar-Apr;65(2):124-64826017
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1971 Oct 23;105(8):819-255170695
PubMed ID
1181016 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibody titers against vaccine and contemporary wild poliovirus type 1 in children immunized with IPV+OPV and young adults immunized with OPV.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277811
Source
Virus Res. 2016 Feb 2;213:162-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2-2016
Author
Alexander N Lukashev
Maria S Yarmolskaya
Elena Yu Shumilina
Daniil A Sychev
Liubov I Kozlovskaya
Source
Virus Res. 2016 Feb 2;213:162-4
Date
Feb-2-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Child
Congo
Humans
Poliomyelitis - epidemiology - virology
Poliovirus - immunology - isolation & purification
Poliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated - administration & dosage
Poliovirus Vaccine, Oral - administration & dosage
Russia
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
In 2010, a type 1 poliovirus outbreak in Congo with 445 lethal cases was caused by a virus that was neutralized by sera of German adults vaccinated with inactivated polio vaccine with a reduced efficiency. This seroprevalence study was done in two cohorts immunized with other vaccination schedules. Russian children aged 3-6 years immunized with a combination of inactivated and live polio vaccines were reasonably well protected against any wild type poliovirus 1, including the Congolese isolate. Adults aged 20-29 years immunized only with live vaccine were apparently protected against the vaccine strain (92% seropositive), but only 50% had detectable antibodies against the Congo-2010 isolate. Both waning immunity and serological divergence of the Congolese virus could contribute to this result.
PubMed ID
26657881 View in PubMed
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Antigenic and molecular characterization of wild type 1 poliovirus causing outbreaks of poliomyelitis in Albania and neighboring countries in 1996.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205236
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1998 Jul;36(7):1912-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
L. Fiore
D. Genovese
E. Diamanti
S. Catone
B. Ridolfi
B. Ibrahimi
R. Konomi
H G van der Avoort
T. Hovi
R. Crainic
P. Simeoni
C. Amato
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Virology, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy. fiore@virus1.net.iss.it
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1998 Jul;36(7):1912-8
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Albania - epidemiology
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Antigens, Viral - analysis
Base Sequence
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Greece - epidemiology
Humans
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Neutralization Tests
Phylogeny
Poliomyelitis - epidemiology - virology
Poliovirus - classification - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Yugoslavia - epidemiology
Abstract
Mass vaccination has led poliomyelitis to become a rare disease in a large part of the world, including Western Europe. However, in the past 20 years wild polioviruses imported from countries where polio is endemic have been responsible for outbreaks in otherwise polio-free European countries. We report on the characterization of poliovirus isolates from a large outbreak of poliomyelitis that occurred in Albania in 1996 and that also spread to the neighboring countries of Yugoslavia and Greece. The epidemics involved 145 subjects, mostly young adults, and caused persisting paralysis in 87 individuals and 16 deaths. The agent responsible for the outbreak was isolated from 74 patients and was identified as wild type 1 poliovirus by both immunological and molecular methods. Sequence analysis of the genome demonstrated the involvement of a single virus strain throughout the epidemics, and genotyping analysis showed 95% homology of the strain with a wild type 1 poliovirus strain isolated in Pakistan in 1995. Neutralization assays with both human sera and monoclonal antibodies were performed to analyze the antigenic structure of the epidemic strain, suggesting its peculiar antigenic characteristics. The presented data underline the current risks of outbreaks due to imported wild poliovirus and emphasize the need to improve vaccination efforts and also the need to implement surveillance in countries free of indigenous wild poliovirus.
Notes
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1975 Apr;101(4):333-9164770
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 1998 Feb;26(2):419-259502465
Cites: Dev Biol Stand. 1979;43:195-206230110
Cites: Infect Immun. 1983 Sep;41(3):1217-256193066
Cites: Lancet. 1986 Jun 21;1(8495):1427-322872526
Cites: J Virol. 1989 Dec;63(12):5251-72479772
Cites: Adv Virus Res. 1989;37:243-752557759
Cites: Lancet. 1990 May 19;335(8699):1192-5; discussion 1196-81971043
Cites: Curr Top Microbiol Immunol. 1990;161:121-542169382
Cites: Virology. 1991 Oct;184(2):645-541679577
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 1992 Feb;14(2):568-791554844
Cites: Wkly Epidemiol Rec. 1992 Nov 6;67(45):336-71419570
Cites: Vaccine. 1992;10(12):853-61333689
Cites: J Gen Virol. 1992 Dec;73 ( Pt 12):3065-771335021
Cites: Lancet. 1994 May 28;343(8909):1331-77910329
Cites: Lancet. 1994 Sep 3;344(8923):665-707915354
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Dec 15;140(12):1111-247998593
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1995 Oct;33(10):2562-68567883
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1995 Dec;33(12):3252-68586711
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1997 Feb;175 Suppl 1:S76-819203696
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1997 Feb;175 Suppl 1:S165-729203711
Comment In: J Clin Microbiol. 1999 Jan;37(1):2769988592
PubMed ID
9650935 View in PubMed
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Antigenic and molecular properties of type 3 poliovirus responsible for an outbreak of poliomyelitis in a vaccinated population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57846
Source
J Gen Virol. 1986 May;67 ( Pt 5):899-905
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1986
Author
D I Magrath
D M Evans
M. Ferguson
G C Schild
P D Minor
F. Horaud
R. Crainic
M. Stenvik
T. Hovi
Source
J Gen Virol. 1986 May;67 ( Pt 5):899-905
Date
May-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acid Sequence
Antigens, Viral - genetics
Base Sequence
Feces - microbiology
Finland
Humans
Norway
Oligoribonucleotides - analysis
Poliomyelitis - epidemiology - immunology
Polioviruses - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
RNA, Viral - isolation & purification
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ribonuclease T1
Sweden
Vaccination
Abstract
Virus isolated from an outbreak of poliomyelitis in Finland has been examined serologically and at the molecular level. The causative agent was an antigenically unusual strain of type 3 poliovirus, which was unrelated to the strains used to manufacture either live or killed poliovaccines. It is likely that the antigenic properties of the virus played a part in establishing a limited outbreak of poliomyelitis in a vaccinated population.
PubMed ID
3009690 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antigenic variation among 173 strains of type 3 poliovirus isolated in Finland during the 1984 to 1985 outbreak.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232748
Source
J Gen Virol. 1988 Aug;69 ( Pt 8):1941-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1988
Author
A. Huovilainen
L. Kinnunen
M. Ferguson
T. Hovi
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Gen Virol. 1988 Aug;69 ( Pt 8):1941-8
Date
Aug-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acid Sequence
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Antigenic Variation
Antigens, Viral - analysis
Disease Outbreaks
Finland
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Neutralization Tests
Poliomyelitis - epidemiology - microbiology
Poliovirus - genetics - immunology
RNA, Viral - genetics
Sewage
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Antigenic properties of 128 clinical type 3 poliovirus isolates of the 1984 to 1985 Finland outbreak from 95 persons and 45 strains from sewage water specimens were evaluated using five neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against an antigenic site (designated site 1) on VP1 at amino acids 89 to 100. All five MAbs neutralized the type 3 poliovirus strains used in the vaccines, P3/Saukett and P3/Sabin, but none of them neutralized the prototype strain of the outbreak (P3/Finland/23127/84). Forty-six percent of the clinical isolates resembled the prototype strain (class A) while the rest of the isolates were neutralized by one or more of the MAbs (classes B to D). Although an antigenic drift from A to one of the other classes was observed in sequential specimens from several individuals, no clear-cut overall change in the class distribution was found within the 3 months time span of the outbreak. Homogeneous virus populations were isolated from the sewage specimens using a microtitre endpoint dilution method. The last positive sewage specimens which were obtained in January to February 1985 still had a majority of the class A strain. Some of the clinical isolates were also tested using MAbs directed against distinct antigenic sites. These studies showed that strains that gave the same pattern of reactivity with site 1 MAbs could be differentiated using antibodies directed against other sites. Fifteen strains belonging to different antigenic subclasses were subjected to partial RNA sequencing of the genome region coding for antigenic site 1. The antigenic variation was usually, but not always associated with corresponding amino acid substitutions in antigenic site 1. These results indicate that the antigenic sites of type 3 poliovirus vary extensively within a given outbreak and even during replication in a given host. This variation may have both pathogenetic and epidemiological significance.
PubMed ID
2841408 View in PubMed
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Antipolio prophylaxis of immunocompromised children during a nationwide oral poliovaccine campaign.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234440
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1987 Dec;6(12):1106-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1987
Author
M. Stenvik
L. Hovi
M A Siimes
M. Roivainen
T. Hovi
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1987 Dec;6(12):1106-10
Date
Dec-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies, Viral - biosynthesis
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Female
Finland
Humans
Immune Tolerance
Leukemia - immunology
Male
Poliomyelitis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Poliovirus - immunology - isolation & purification
Poliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated - pharmacology
Poliovirus Vaccine, Oral - pharmacology
Vaccines, Attenuated - pharmacology
Abstract
A nationwide vaccination campaign with oral poliovirus vaccine was organized in Finland in 1985 to halt an outbreak of poliomyelitis. Immunocompromised persons and their household contacts were excluded from the oral poliovirus vaccine target group and given instead a dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine. This gave us an opportunity to determine whether immunocompromised persons are protected from poliomyelitis during an outbreak and oral poliovirus campaign. Fourteen children, ages 3 to 17 years, with leukemia were given a booster dose of a novel high antigen content, trivalent inactivated poliovirus vaccine. All but two responded by an at least 4-fold increase in serum-neutralizing antibodies to at least one poliovirus serotype. These results indicate that children with acute lymphocytic leukemia in remission respond well to a booster dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine. Antibody concentrations to the uncommon local epidemic strain of type 3 poliovirus remained, however, relatively low in most patients (median, 1:6) suggesting relatively impaired heterologous response to vaccination. Possible spread of live vaccine viruses to the inactivated poliovirus-vaccinated children and their close contacts was evaluated by examining weekly fecal specimens from 20 children and their 19 regular adult contacts for cytopathic viruses. No polioviruses were isolated from 224 specimens examined, indicating that this high risk population was well-protected from unintended exposure to live polioviruses.
PubMed ID
2829105 View in PubMed
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149 records – page 1 of 15.