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Source
The International Wilderness Leadership (WILD) Foundation. The 5th World Wilderness Congress, Tromso, Norway, 24-25 September, 1993.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
1995
by1 Vance G. Manin and Nicholas Tyler. p cm. Held in Troms@, Norway in 1.993. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 1-55591-931-6 (PaPerback) 1. Nature conselvation-Arctic fegions-{ongresses. 2. Nature conservation-Polar regions-Congresses. 3. Ecosystem management -Arctic regions
  1 document  
Author
Vance G. Martin
Nicholas Tyler
Source
The International Wilderness Leadership (WILD) Foundation. The 5th World Wilderness Congress, Tromso, Norway, 24-25 September, 1993.
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
5495967
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Polar regions
Congresses
Nature conservation
Ecosystem management
Wilderness areas
Abstract
The 5th WWC convened in Tromso, Norway, north of the Arctic Circle, under the theme Wild Nature and Sustainable Living in Circumpolar Regions. The aim of the 5th WWC was to enhance awareness of the natural beauty, natural resources, and the aesthetic and scientific importance of the Arctic and Antarctica-the two largest, continuous, relatively undisturbed ecosystems on Earth. A greater physical contrast between these regions and the woodlands of Umfolozi where the WWC was conceived (see Preface) could hardly be imagined. But the inherent value of natural environment and the conservation imperative that must be upheld in these and all wild regions of the Earth are exactly the same.
The WWC has always insisted on a balanced, holistic approach to problem solving in which philosophy, culture, and the arts are as important as the biological and physical sciences, economics, and politics. In this spirit, the fifth congress was convened in parallel with the first Northern Forum conference, the theme of which was People in the Arctic: Regional Rights and Regional Management. This cooperation was a new initiative, which provided an opportunity to present and discuss major issues in conservation and sustainable development in northern regions from an especially wide range of perspectives. Dialogue of this kind is essential as never before to secure both preservation of polar wilderness and sustainable living for the people of the North.
Notes
ISBN 1555919316
Documents

THE-5TH-WORLD-WILDERNESS-CONGRESS-ARCTIC-WILDERNESS_web.pdf

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Effect of weather factors on aircraft maintenance crews in Arctic areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298712
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-63-18. 10 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1963
Polar Regions Exposure Project 8238 Task 823802 Karstens, A. I., Col., USAF Available from OTS In ASTIA collection Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory, United States Air Force (AFSC ), APO 731, Seattle, Wash. Rpt. AAL- TDR-63- 18. EFFECT OF WEATHER F ACTORS ON AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE CREWS IN ARCTIC
  1 document  
Author
Karstens, A.I.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-63-18. 10 p.
Date
June 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3195514
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Humans
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Polar regions
Aviation personnel
Maintenance personnel
Abstract
Under conditions of dry cold with no wind, loss of aircraft maintenance crew effectiveness at temperatures down to 0° F is small; below 0° F, outdoor maintenance performance falls off until it may reach zero for poorly motivated crews at - 30° F; better motivated crews will attain some degree of effectiveness at the lowest temperatures encountered without wind. Under conditions of dry cold with wind, outdoor maintenance usually becomes essentially ineffective when the wind chill factor is comparable to or greater than that produced by a 10 mph wind and -15° F temperature, although some crews will perform some maintenance under these conditions. Winds in excess of 30 mph interfere with visibility due to blowing snow. It is concluded that performance could be markedly improved with adequate motivation and experience; that development of adequate face protection and of clothing less pervious to wind is feasible; and that better solutions to the problem of hand protection and dexterity under high wind chill conditions should be sought.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.63-18
Documents
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Effects of partial cold water immersion on man in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298716
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-63-24. 11 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1963
. 4. 5. Frostbite Exposure Legs Body Temperature Polar Regions L Project 8238, Task _823801 *~~eghte, J. H., Capt., •..,:;:j/sAF ttr- ':available from OTS itf.~ .. ln DDC collection 1r·n ,~c.....,, r~··~\~ ' Cf>i·. !~' Experiments were conducted to determine how criti- cal a
  1 document  
Author
Veghte, James H.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-63-24. 11 p.
Date
June 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1061138
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Humans
Male
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Hypothermia
Body temperatures
Polar regions
Legs
Abstract
Experiments were conducted to determine how critical a hazard to man partial cold water immersion would be during the Arctic winter and how long a time would be available before frostbite could be expected. At ambient temperatures ranging from -2° to -45° F, subject's right leg was immersed to the knee in water for 10 seconds, after which the subject either stood at rest or exercised. Twenty-four skin temperature measurements were recorded every two minutes, and experiments were terminated when any skin temperature reached 40° F. Data indicate that footgear should not be removed after accidental partial cold water immersion and that, even with no activity, a person has approximately 30 minutes before any danger of frostbite occurs. Exercising or walking greatly prolongs tolerance time and, even at very low temperatures, one may walk for hours before the foot temperature becomes dangerously low.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.63-24
Documents
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Global Fractionation and Cold Condensation of Low Volatility Organochlorine Compounds in Polar Regions

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300998
Source
AMBIO Vol 22, No 1, pp 10-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb 1993
Author
F Wania
D Mackay
Source
AMBIO Vol 22, No 1, pp 10-18
Date
Feb 1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Pesticides
Polar regions
Chlorinated hydrocarbons
Chemicals
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
Marine ecosystems
Temperate regions
Marine fishes
Aerosols
Chemosphere
Abstract
Organochlorine chemicals, including chlorinated pesticides and polychlorobiphenyls, are found at appreciable concentrations in the polar regions, presumably as a result of long-range atmospheric transport. Concentration data in arctic and antarctic air, snow, atmospheric deposition, fish and seals, measured by various investigators, are compiled and interpreted to determine latitudinal and temporal trends. It is suggested that the often surprisingly high concentrations are explained in part by the temperature-dependent partitioning of these low volatility compounds. A process of global fractionation may be occurring in which organic compounds become latitudinally fractionated, "condensing" at different ambient temperatures dependent on their volatility. We suggest that compounds with vapor pressures in a certain low range may preferentially accumulate in polar regions. Possible adverse effects of these potentially toxic compounds on the indigenous population and on the arctic ecosystem are discussed. It is concluded that there is a need to control or even ban certain chemicals which have a tendency to fractionate into the polar ecosystems.
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Human circadian rhythms in polar regions

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85456
Source
Pages 166-167 in Scientific and Technical Progress and Circumpolar Health. The Abstracts Accepted for the IV International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Volume II.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
BIORHY~mllCAL ASPECTS OF ADAPr.lBLJ!; IAJ!:CHANISr.!S CHRON013IOLOr.rc ·.ranrcnra I1' Al'tCTIC 11'.H a l b e .r g (llinnea,polis, USA) {The abstract was not presented) HUMAN CIRCADIAN" RHYTHlllS IN POLAR REGIONS 11..P.ll o s h k 1 n, V • .A. •. D y a c h k o v, Yu.O.K i m, v.s.P o s n 1
  1 document  
Author
M.P. Moshkin
V.A. Dyachkov
Yu. O. Kim
V.S. Posniy
Yu. P. Shorin
Author Affiliation
Novosibirsk, USSR
Source
Pages 166-167 in Scientific and Technical Progress and Circumpolar Health. The Abstracts Accepted for the IV International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Volume II.
Date
1978
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Human circadian rhythms
Polar regions
Documents
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Source
International Council for Science (ICSU) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO)
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Source
International Council for Science (ICSU) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO)
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Website
Keywords
Polar regions
Atmosphere
Ice
land
Oceans
People
Space
Notes
The International Polar Year is a large scientific programme focused on the Arctic and the Antarctic from March 2007 to March 2009.
Website includes links to articles, news, announcements, blogs, and other publications.
Online Resources
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International Polar Year 2007-2008: Report of the Implementation Workshop

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76026
Source
Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. 55 pages.
Date
2005
  1 website  
Author
National Research Council of the National Academies
Source
Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. 55 pages.
Date
2005
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Keywords
International Polar Year 2007-2008
Polar regions
Research and development
Abstract
This report discusses development planning for research and observations in polar regions for the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008. The IPY will galvanixe new and innovative observations and research while at the same time build on and enhance existing initiatives.
Notes
ISBNs: Paperback: 978-0-309-09437-5, Ebook: 978-0-309-18237-9
Online Resources
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International Polar Year 2007-2008, resources on polar research in the NOAA Central Library Network, a selected bibliography

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6576
Source
U. S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service National Oceanographic Data Center NOAA Central Library. 201 p.
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
Date
January 2006
resources on exploration and research in Polar Regions. The Bibliography includes citations organized “by title” from NOAALINC, the library's online catalog, and from the library's historical collections. The data and listings are comprehensive from the 18th century to the present. The formats
  1 document  
Author
Fiolek, A.
Author Affiliation
NOAA Central Library
Source
U. S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service National Oceanographic Data Center NOAA Central Library. 201 p.
Date
January 2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
File Size
1490286
Keywords
Antarctic
Arctic
Exploration
Fourth International Polar Year
International Polar Year
IPY 2007-2008
Polar
Polar regions
Polar research
Research
Abstract
This bibliography has been prepared to support NOAA Central Library (NCL) activities during International Polar Year 2007-2008. It reflects the NCL network?s unique printed and online resources on exploration and research in Polar Regions. The Bibliography includes citations formatted ?by title? from NOAALINC, the library's online catalog and from the library's historical collections. The data and listings are comprehensive from the 18th century to the present. This resource contains all formats, including print, CD-ROM, online full-text documents, digital videos, digital images, online cruise data and Web resources. This document provides full-text access, copyright permitting, to significant Polar documents in the NOAA Library collections.
Notes
Revised April 2007; Revised September 2008.
Documents
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Metabolism, endocrine status, and allergy in the extreme north

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102354
Source
Pages 593-603 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
. The present allergy situation in polar regions, especially in active industrial assimilation centres, undoubtedly stipulates necessity of a careful analysis of its forming mechanism and a search for effec- tive methods of prevention and correction of allergic disorders. Our studies have revealed
  1 document  
Author
Hasnulin, P.V
Seliatitskaya, V.G
Author Affiliation
Scientific Center of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Soviet Branch, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences
Source
Pages 593-603 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Allergic diseases
Allergies
Endocrine status
High latitude
Insulin
Metabolism
North
Polar regions
Prevalence
Thyroid Hormones
Abstract
The problem of allergic diseases has become more and more pressing in recent years, owing to a broad prevalence and constant morbidity growth in the whole world, especially in high-latitude regions. The present allergy situation in polar regions, especially in active industrial assimilation centers, undoubtedly stipulates necessity of a careful analysis of its forming mechanism and a search for effective methods of prevention and correction of allergic disorders. Our studies have revealed the significant influence of ecologically stipulated endocrine status modification on frequency of allergic disorders in the north. However, the character of the immune system and liver function in the case of blood cortisol increase has not allowed us to link allergic reactions with corticosteroid production by activation of the adrenal glands. Allergies in the north are mostly dependent on the influence of insulin and thyroid hormones. As it appears, allergies occur mainly among persons with a higher insulin level. Combination of high blood insulin concentration with functional disorders of the digestive system increases the allergy frequency. A similar picture of allergy frequency dependence also emerges in thyroid hormones blood level evaluation. Generally our investigations allow us to make the conclusion that allergic disorders in migrants to northern territories are an indication of the exhaustion of the organism' s reserve abilities and are mainly connected with disorders of the function of the gastrointestinal tract and liver, which are stipulated by extreme climate-geophysical conditions of the north, including technogenous industrial contamination. This could probably be connected either to a reduction of gastrointestinal tract barrier function for exogenous allergens or to a decrease of metabolism velocity and the clearing of antigen substances by liver.
Documents
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Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Website
Keywords
Polar regions
Research
Education
Abstract
PEI is a vibrant network promoting polar education and research to a global community. By fostering dialogue and collaboration between educators and researchers, PEI aims to highlight and share the global relevance of the polar regions with the broader community.
Online Resources
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13 records – page 1 of 2.