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[20th century view of Poland by Russian historians. An account of: Pol'sza XX wiekie w: oczerki politiczeskoj istorii [Poland in the twentieth century: political history essays], Indryk, Moskwa, 2012, 949 p].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268856
Source
Organon. 2014;(46):171-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Daniel Beauvois
Source
Organon. 2014;(46):171-93
Date
2014
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Historiography
History
History, 20th Century
Poland
Politics
Russia
PubMed ID
26638583 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Gesnerus. 1990;47 Pt 1:83-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
H F Piper
Source
Gesnerus. 1990;47 Pt 1:83-94
Date
1990
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Austria
Denmark
English Abstract
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Mikulicz' Disease - history
Poland
Portraits
Abstract
Between 1888 and 1892, Mikulicz as well as Fuchs observed each a case of oculo-salivary glandular syndrome. Ten years later, Heerfordt described uveitis complicated by swelling of the lacrimal and salivary glands. Within 100 years, the interpretation of this disease changed repeatedly and considerably: infection of particularly exposed organs--non-avirulent tuberculosis--salivotropic virus--Boeck's disease--allergic-hyperergic reaction--diencephalic and nervous dystrophy with segmental projection--(auto)immune disease--oculo-salivary complex including Sjøgren's syndrome--all these were discussed as possible aetiologies. Short biographies of Johannes von Mikulicz-Radecki, surgeon at Austrian and Prussian universities; Ernst Fuchs, ophthalmologist of Vienna; Christian Frederik Heerfordt, a Danish ophthalmologist particularly fond of publicity.
PubMed ID
2184107 View in PubMed
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The 4154delA mutation carriers in the BRCA1 gene share a common ancestry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153810
Source
Fam Cancer. 2009;8(1):1-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Silvija Ozolina
Olga Sinicka
Eriks Jankevics
Inna Inashkina
Jan Lubinski
Bohdan Gorski
Jacek Gronwald
Tatyana Nasedkina
Olga Fedorova
Ludmila Lyubchenko
Laima Tihomirova
Author Affiliation
Latvian Biomedical Research and Study Centre, Ratsupites str. 1, Riga, 1067, Latvia.
Source
Fam Cancer. 2009;8(1):1-4
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - genetics
DNA Mutational Analysis
Female
Founder Effect
Genes, BRCA1
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Haplotypes
Humans
Latvia
Male
Microsatellite Repeats
Mutation
Pedigree
Poland
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational
Russia
Abstract
Uncertainty exists whether the 4154delA mutation of the BRCA1 gene detected in unrelated individuals from Latvia, Poland and Russia is a founder mutation with a common ancestral origin. To trace back this problem we analysed the mutation-associated haplotype of the BRCA1 intragenic SNPs as well as intragenic and nearby STR markers in mutation carriers from the aforementioned populations. The mutation-associated SNP alleles were found to be "T-A-A-A-A-G" for six intragenic SNPs of the BRCA1 gene (IVS8-58delT, 3232A/G, 3667A/G, IVS16-68A/G, IVS16-92A/G, IVS18+66G/A, respectively). The alleles 195, 154, 210 and 181 were found to be associated with the 4154delA mutation for STR markers D17S1325, D17S855, D17S1328 and D17S1320, correspondingly. Further analysis of markers in the 4154delA mutation carriers from all three populations allows us to assert that all analysed mutation carriers share a common ancestry.
PubMed ID
19067236 View in PubMed
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Abortion laws cause problems in Poland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64591
Source
BMJ. 1995 Jun 17;310(6994):1556-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-17-1995
Author
M. Gajewski
Source
BMJ. 1995 Jun 17;310(6994):1556-7
Date
Jun-17-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal
Female
Humans
Poland
Pregnancy
Abstract
A doctor who performed an abortion in Poland faces two years in prison and the loss of his medical license for up to 10 years if he is found guilty of violating the new abortion laws introduced in 1993 after a lengthy campaign by the Catholic church and the Christian Democratic Union party. The new laws permit abortion when the pregnancy threatens the life of the mother, presents a serious health threat to the mother, is the result of rape or incest, or will result in the birth of a irreversibly and seriously malformed fetus. In this case, the woman had the abortion because she could not afford to support the child on her own; her former lover faces two years in prison if he is convicted of having paid for the operation. The new law follows a 40-year period of liberal abortion laws under the communist regime when abortion was seen as a form of contraception; an estimated 100,000 abortions occurred in the 1980s. The number of recorded abortions decreased to 777 (nine were in contravention of the law) in 1993. However, some abortions have gone underground; this one surfaced because of an angry former lover. Doctors can now charge two months' salary for the illegal operation, forcing many of the women go to Russia, Belarus, or the Ukraine where the operation is cheaper. Other women take matters into their own hands; one woman murdered the baby she would have aborted earlier.
PubMed ID
7787640 View in PubMed
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[About life, work and health problems of fishermen employed by PPP and H "Dalmor" SA., fishing at the Sea of Okhotsk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216598
Source
Med Pr. 1995;46(3):309-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995

[Acceptance of mammographic screening by immigrant women]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19313
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Jan 7;164(2):195-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-7-2002
Author
Ida Kristine Holk
Nils Rosdahl
Karen L Damgaard Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Embedslaegeinstitutionen for Københavns, Frederiksberg Kommuner, Henrik Pontoppidansvej 8, DK-2200 København N.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Jan 7;164(2):195-200
Date
Jan-7-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control - psychology - radiography
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Mammography - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Mass Screening - methods - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Pakistan - ethnology
Patient compliance
Poland - ethnology
Turkey - ethnology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim was to investigate compliance by ethnic groups to the mammography screening programme in the City of Copenhagen over six years and to look at developments over time. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Mammography screening has, since 1 April 1991, been offered free of charge to all women between 50 and 69 years of age in the City of Copenhagen. Data on women born in Poland, Turkey, Yugoslavia, and Pakistan divided into five-year groups were compared to that of women born in Denmark and all other foreign-born women. Data from 1991 to 1997 were grouped according to the mammography performed, the offer refused, or non-appearance. RESULTS: Whereas 71% of Danish-born women accepted mammography, compliance by foreign-born women was significantly lower. The offer was accepted by 36% of Pakistanis, 45% of Yugoslavians, 53% of Turks, and 64% of Poles. Compliance fell in all ethnic groups with advancing age. Of the Danish women, 16% failed to keep the appointment. The corresponding percentages were 52 for Pakistanis, 48 for Yugoslavians, 41 for Turks, and 23 for Poles. The proportion of women who actively refused the offer was similar in all groups. The number of invited women fell during the period. CONCLUSIONS: The lower participation of women from the countries under study might have various explanations: among them the language barrier, procedure-related factors, and a lower incidence of breast cancer in the countries of origin.
PubMed ID
11831089 View in PubMed
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Accumulation and distribution of mercury in fruiting bodies by fungus Suillus luteus foraged in Poland, Belarus and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276806
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016 Feb;23(3):2749-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Martyna Saba
Jerzy Falandysz
Innocent C Nnorom
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016 Feb;23(3):2749-57
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Fruiting Bodies, Fungal - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Mercury - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Poland - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Republic of Belarus - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Soil - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Soil Pollutants - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Spectrophotometry, Atomic - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Sweden - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Vegetables - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Abstract
Presented in this paper is result of the study of the bioconcentration potential of mercury (Hg) by Suillus luteus mushroom collected from regions within Central, Eastern, and Northern regions of Europe. As determined by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy, the Hg content varied from 0.13 ? 0.05 to 0.33 ? 0.13 mg kg(-1) dry matter for caps and from 0.038 ? 0.014 to 0.095 ? 0.038 mg kg(-1) dry matter in stems. The Hg content of the soil substratum (0-10 cm layer) underneath the fruiting bodies showed generally low Hg concentrations that varied widely ranging from 0.0030 to 0.15 mg kg(-1) dry matter with mean values varying from 0.0078 ? 0.0035 to 0.053 ? 0.025 mg kg(-1) dry matter, which is below typical content in the Earth crust. The caps were observed to be on the richer in Hg than the stems at ratio between 1.8 ? 0.4 and 5.3 ? 2.6. The S. luteus mushroom showed moderate ability to accumulate Hg with bioconcentration factor (BCF) values ranging from 3.6 ? 1.3 to 42 ? 18. The consumption of fresh S. luteus mushroom in quantities up to 300 g week(-1) (assuming no Hg ingestion from other foods) from background areas in the Central, Eastern, and Northern part of Europe will not result in the intake of Hg exceeds the provisional weekly tolerance limit (PTWI) of 0.004 mg kg(-1) body mass.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26446731 View in PubMed
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Affix processing strategies and linguistic systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239204
Source
J Child Lang. 1985 Feb;12(1):27-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1985

Alcohol consumption and physical functioning among middle-aged and older adults in Central and Eastern Europe: results from the HAPIEE study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265251
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Jan;44(1):84-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Yaoyue Hu
Hynek Pikhart
Sofia Malyutina
Andrzej Pajak
Ruzena Kubinova
Yuri Nikitin
Anne Peasey
Michael Marmot
Martin Bobak
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Jan;44(1):84-9
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Poland - epidemiology
Protective factors
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
light-to-moderate drinking is apparently associated with a decreased risk of physical limitations in middle-aged and older adults.
to investigate the association between alcohol consumption and physical limitations in Eastern European populations.
a cross-sectional survey of 28,783 randomly selected residents (45-69 years) in Novosibirsk (Russia), Krakow (Poland) and seven towns of Czech Republic.
physical limitations were defined as
Notes
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PubMed ID
24982097 View in PubMed
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Alcohol control policies: a public health issue revisited.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242426
Source
WHO Chron. 1983;37(5):169-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983

469 records – page 1 of 47.