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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Source
Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2012 Jul 1;69(13):1108
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2012

[Are you familiar with the poison center? Concise evidence-based information for optimal management of poisonings ].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115938
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2012 May-Jun;9(3):28-9
Publication Type
Article

A bird's eye review of the evolution of the Canadian Poison Control Program (1957-1989).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220617
Source
Vet Hum Toxicol. 1993 Aug;35(4):301-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
E. Napke
Source
Vet Hum Toxicol. 1993 Aug;35(4):301-2
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Poison Control Centers - organization & administration
PubMed ID
8236747 View in PubMed
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Direct access--a Poison and Drug Information Centre experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209064
Source
AARN News Lett. 1997 Mar;53(3):14-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997

Exotic snakes are not always found in exotic places: how poison centres can assist emergency departments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160685
Source
Emerg Med J. 2007 Nov;24(11):796-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Carol Lubich
Edward P Krenzelok
Author Affiliation
Pittsburgh Poison Center, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, School of Pharmacy, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.
Source
Emerg Med J. 2007 Nov;24(11):796-7
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Antivenins - therapeutic use
Cobra Venoms
Elapidae
Female
Humans
Male
Poison Control Centers - organization & administration
Snake Bites - therapy
Abstract
Emergency departments throughout the USA may have some familiarity with the management of envenomation from indigenous snake species such as Crotalinae (rattlesnakes) and Micrurus (coral snakes). However, venomous species may include exotic reptiles whose bites pose substantial treatment challenges due to both a lack of experience and the difficulty in obtaining antivenoms. Two pet cobra envenomation incidents illustrate the challenges that face emergency departments, especially in urban settings, that are confronted with these exposures. It is important for emergency departments to be aware of the large underground presence of exotic venomous reptile pets and to utilise the expertise of regional poison centres that will also assist in the procurement of exotic antivenoms.
Notes
Cites: J Toxicol Clin Toxicol. 2003;41(3):261-212807309
Cites: Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2006;44(6-7):803-93217015284
PubMed ID
17954846 View in PubMed
Less detail

Information technologies for clinical toxicology in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213242
Source
J Toxicol Clin Toxicol. 1996;34(6):665-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
N N Litvinov
Y N Ostapenko
V I Kazachkov
Author Affiliation
Toxicology Information and Advisory Center, Russian Federation Ministry of Health, Moscow, Russia.
Source
J Toxicol Clin Toxicol. 1996;34(6):665-8
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Communication Networks - organization & administration
Humans
Poison Control Centers - organization & administration
Russia
Toxicology - methods
Abstract
To describe Poison Information in Russia.
The Moscow Toxicology Information and Advisory Center was created in 1993 as an institution of the Russian Federation Ministry of Health and Medical Industry. The Toxicology Information and Advisory Center is the first in a network of over 20 toxicology information centers to be created in different regions of Russia by 1998. At present the Toxicology Information and Advisory Center serves over 20 million people in the Moscow region with episodic inquiries from other areas. A prototype national bank of clinical and toxicological data on acute chemical poisoning and an information retrieval system POISON have been created. Work is underway to create computerized systems for data analysis of telephone inquiries on diagnosis and treatment protocols of acute poisoning.
PubMed ID
8941194 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Problems in the standardization of inpatient health care in clinical toxicology].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152550
Source
Anesteziol Reanimatol. 2008 Nov-Dec;(6):11-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu N Ostapenko
N N Litvinov
P G Rozhkov
K K Il'iashenko
Iu S Gol'dfarb
Source
Anesteziol Reanimatol. 2008 Nov-Dec;(6):11-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Medicine - standards
Humans
Patient Care Management - organization & administration - standards
Poison Control Centers - organization & administration - standards - utilization
Poisoning - epidemiology - therapy
Quality of Health Care
Reference Standards
Russia - epidemiology
Toxicology - standards
Abstract
Standardization of inpatient toxicological care is an urgent task to reduce mortality from acute chemical poisonings. Since 2005, health care standards and patient management protocols in poisonings with psychotropic and hypnotic agents, ethanol and other alcohols, and ethylene glycol have been developed and work is in progress on standards for intoxication with corrosive substances, soaps, detergents, carbon dioxide, other gases, smokes, and vapors. Major difficulties have been revealed. These are the lack of coincidence of the "Nomenclature of work and services in public health service" at the federal level with the similar regional documents; improper presentation of toxicological diagnostic and medical technologies; orientation of the Ministry of Health and Social Development of Russia towards only simple services; the "List of Essential and Most Important Drugs" that does not contain the heading "antidote agents" at all is to be completed.
PubMed ID
19227285 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.