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180 records – page 1 of 18.

[20-year experience with modified dose fractionation of radiotherapy in primary Hodgkin's disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154608
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2008;54(4):529-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
N V Il'in
E N Nikolaeva
E V Smirnova
Iu N Vinogradova
E I Ivanova
B M Izotov
I A Shenderova
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2008;54(4):529-31
Date
2008
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biomedical research
Disease-Free Survival
Dose Fractionation
Female
Hodgkin Disease - radiotherapy
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Leukopenia - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pericarditis - epidemiology - etiology
Pneumonia - epidemiology - etiology
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Thrombocytopenia - epidemiology - etiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Significantly lower frequency of relapse, incidence of pulmonitis and pericarditis, leukopenia and thrombocytopenia stage IV and longer recurrence-free survival were reported after acceleration of multifractionation of STD of 1.35Gy was used for treatment of patients with primary Hodgkin's disease, as compared with standard fractionation. When STD was reduced to 1.2Gy (modified multifractionation), subtotal exposure of lymph nodes was followed by a significant drop in frequency and severity of leukopenia and thrombocytopenia stage III-IV. The latter complications, rates decreased further, with perspective response to therapy, as irradiation was limited to that of areas exposed during modified multifractionation.
PubMed ID
18942416 View in PubMed
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[Acclimatization and clinical peculiarities of some internal diseases in the Arctic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110106
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 1969 May;47(5):10-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1969

Aetiologies and risk factors for neonatal sepsis and pneumonia mortality among Alaskan infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6614
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2005 Oct;133(5):877-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
B D Gessner
L. Castrodale
M. Soriano-Gabarro
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, Section of Epidemiology, Anchorage, Alaska 99524, USA. Brad_Gessner@health.state.ak.us
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2005 Oct;133(5):877-81
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Candida - isolation & purification
Candidiasis - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology - mortality
Databases, Factual
Gram-Negative Bacteria - isolation & purification
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology - mortality
Gram-Positive Bacteria - isolation & purification
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology - mortality
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Pneumonia - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology - mortality
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Septicemia - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology - mortality
Abstract
We evaluated all fatal neonatal sepsis and pneumonia cases occurring in Alaska during 1992-2000. Risk factors were evaluated using a database of all births occurring during the study period. Of 32 cases, group B streptococcus (GBS) was isolated from 21% (all 7 days of age), non-GBS Gram-positive bacteria from 50% (53%
PubMed ID
16181508 View in PubMed
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Age disparities in stroke quality of care and delivery of health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149008
Source
Stroke. 2009 Oct;40(10):3328-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Gustavo Saposnik
Sandra E Black
Antoine Hakim
Jiming Fang
Jack V Tu
Moira K Kapral
Author Affiliation
Stroke Research Unit, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. saposnikg@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Stroke. 2009 Oct;40(10):3328-35
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Atrial Fibrillation - drug therapy - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Cost of Illness
Deglutition Disorders - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Emergency Medical Services - standards - statistics & numerical data - trends
Female
Health Policy
Health Services - economics
Hospital Units - standards - statistics & numerical data - trends
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Longevity
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - economics
Patient Discharge - economics
Pneumonia - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Quality of Health Care - statistics & numerical data - trends
Quality of Life
Severity of Illness Index
Stroke - complications - mortality - therapy
Thrombolytic Therapy - statistics & numerical data - trends
Warfarin - therapeutic use
Abstract
Limited information is available on the effect of age on stroke management and care delivery. Our aim was to determine whether access to stroke care, delivery of health services, and clinical outcomes after stroke are affected by age.
This was a prospective cohort study of patients with acute ischemic stroke in the province of Ontario, Canada, admitted to stroke centers participating in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network between July 1, 2003 and March 31, 2005. Primary outcomes were the following selected indicators of quality stroke care: (1) use of thrombolysis; (2) dysphagia screening; (3) admission to a stroke unit; (4) carotid imaging; (5) antithrombotic therapy; and (6) warfarin for atrial fibrillation at discharge. Secondary outcomes were risk-adjusted stroke fatality, discharge disposition, pneumonia, and length of hospital stay.
Among 3631 patients with ischemic stroke, 1219 (33.6%) were older than 80 years. There were no significant differences in stroke care delivery by age group. Stroke fatality increased with age, with a 30-day risk adjusted fatality of 7.1%, 6.5%, 8.8%, and 14.8% for those aged 59 or younger, 60 to 69, 70 to 79, and 80 years or older, respectively. Those aged older than 80 years had a longer length of hospitalization, increased risk of pneumonia, and higher disability at discharge compared to those younger than 80. This group was also less likely to be discharged home.
In the context of a province-wide coordinated stroke care system, stroke care delivery was similar across all age groups with the exception of slightly lower rates of investigations in the very elderly. Increasing age was associated with stroke severity and stroke case-fatality.
PubMed ID
19696418 View in PubMed
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Age-related trends in the timeliness and prediction of medical visits, hospitalizations and deaths due to pneumonia and influenza, British Columbia, Canada, 1998-2004.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158739
Source
Vaccine. 2008 Mar 4;26(10):1397-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-4-2008
Author
R. Sebastian
D M Skowronski
M. Chong
J. Dhaliwal
J S Brownstein
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Services, British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, 655 12th Avenue West, Vancouver, British Columbia, V5Z 4R4 Canada.
Source
Vaccine. 2008 Mar 4;26(10):1397-403
Date
Mar-4-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Forecasting
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - immunology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Office visits - statistics & numerical data
Pneumonia - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Seasons
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The influenza immunization program in North America has been primarily designed to provide direct benefit to vaccinated individuals at highest risk of serious influenza outcomes. Some evidence suggests that immunization of certain age groups may also extend indirect protective benefit to vulnerable populations. Our goal was to identify age groups associated earliest with seasonal influenza activity and who may have the greatest indirect impact at the population level. We examined age-based associations between influenza medical visits and population-wide hospitalization/mortality due to pneumonia & influenza (P&I) using administrative datasets in British Columbia, Canada. A peak week was identified for each age group based on the highest rates observed in a given week for that study year. Mean rates at the peak week were averaged over the study years per age group. Timeliness (T) was defined as the mean difference in days between the first peak in influenza medical visits and population-wide P&I hospitalizations/deaths. Poisson regression was applied to calculate prediction (Pr) as the average proportion of deviance in P&I explained by influenza medical visits. T and Pr were derived by age group, and the product (T x Pr) was used as a summary measure to rank potential indirect effects of influenza by age group. Young children (0-23 months) and the elderly (> or = 65 years) had the highest peak rates of P&I hospitalization. Children
Notes
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PubMed ID
18280620 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and pneumonia: the "old man" has a new "friend".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146569
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2010 Jan 1;181(1):5-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2010

All-cause pneumonia hospitalizations in children <2 years old in sweden, 1998 to 2012: impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268464
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(11):e112211
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Anders Berglund
Mats Ekelund
Mark A Fletcher
Lars Nyman
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(11):e112211
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Heptavalent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine - therapeutic use
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Immunization Programs
Incidence
Infant
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - therapeutic use
Pneumonia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In late 2007, some Swedish County Councils started 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) implementation for children, and PCV7 was included in the national immunization program in 2009. By 2010, both PCV10 and PCV13 were licensed, and the selection of vaccine was subject to County Councils tenders. This study investigated the impact of the order of PCV introduction into vaccination programs on the incidence of all-cause pneumonia hospitalizations in children
Notes
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PubMed ID
25379659 View in PubMed
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Allogeneic blood transfusion and prognosis following total hip replacement: a population-based follow up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98492
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2009;10:167
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Alma B Pedersen
Frank Mehnert
Soren Overgaard
Soren P Johnsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Allé 43-45, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. abp@dce.au.dk
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2009;10:167
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects - methods - statistics & numerical data
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pneumonia - epidemiology
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Postoperative Hemorrhage - therapy
Prognosis
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Transplantation, Homologous
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Allogeneic red blood cell transfusion is frequently used in total hip replacement surgery (THR). However, data on the prognosis of transfused patients are sparse. In this study we compared the risk of complications following THR in transfused and non-transfused patients. METHODS: A population-based follow-up study was performed using data from medical databases in Denmark. We identified 28,087 primary THR procedures performed from 1999 to 2007, from which we computed a propensity score for red blood cell transfusion based on detailed data on patient-, procedure-, and hospital-related characteristics. We were able to match 2,254 transfused with 2,254 non-transfused THR patients using the propensity score. RESULTS: Of the 28,087 THR patients, 9,063 (32.3%) received at least one red blood cell transfusion within 8 days of surgery. Transfused patients had higher 90-day mortality compared with matched non-transfused patients: the adjusted OR was 2.2 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2-3.8). Blood transfusion was also associated with increased odds of pneumonia (OR 2.1; CI: 1.2-3.8), whereas the associations with cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events (OR 1.4; CI: 0.9-2.2) and venous thromboembolism (OR 1.2; CI: 0.7-2.1) did not reach statistical significance. The adjusted OR of reoperation due to infection was 0.6 (CI: 0.1-2.9). CONCLUSIONS: Red blood cell transfusion was associated with an adverse prognosis following primary THR, in particular with increased odds of death and pneumonia. Although the odds estimates may partly reflect unmeasured bias due to blood loss, they indicate the need for careful assessment of the risk versus benefit of transfusion even in relation to routine THR procedures.
PubMed ID
20040083 View in PubMed
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Anaesthetic practice and postoperative pulmonary complications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222795
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1992 Nov;36(8):812-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1992
Author
T. Pedersen
J. Viby-Mogensen
C. Ringsted
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1992 Nov;36(8):812-8
Date
Nov-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anesthesia Recovery Period
Anesthesia, Conduction - methods
Anesthesia, General - methods
Atracurium - administration & dosage
Bupivacaine - administration & dosage
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Pancuronium - administration & dosage
Pneumonia - epidemiology
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Atelectasis - epidemiology
Respiratory Insufficiency - epidemiology
Risk factors
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications. The influence of the anaesthetic technique was evaluated (i.e. general contra regional anaesthesia and long contra intermediately acting muscle relaxants (pancuronium and atracurium)) taking into account the patient's age, the presence or absence of chronic obstructive lung disease (preoperative risk factors), the type of surgery and the duration of anaesthesia (perioperative risk factors). Seven thousand and twenty-nine patients undergoing abdominal, urological, gynaecological or orthopaedic surgery were included in the study. A total of 290 patients (4.1%) suffered from one or more postoperative pulmonary complications. Six thousand and sixty-two patients received general anaesthesia and 4.5% of these had postoperative pulmonary complications. Of the patients admitted to major surgery receiving pancuronium, 12.7% (135/1062) developed postoperative pulmonary complications, compared to only 5.1% (23/449) receiving atracurium (P
PubMed ID
1466220 View in PubMed
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180 records – page 1 of 18.