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32 records – page 1 of 4.

Beta-lactamase production in the upper respiratory tract flora in relation to antibiotic consumption: a study in children attending day nurseries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38627
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1988;20(3):329-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
S. Mölstad
I. Eliasson
B. Hovelius
C. Kamme
C. Schalén
Author Affiliation
Community Health Center, Höör, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1988;20(3):329-34
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Child
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Haemophilus influenzae - enzymology - isolation & purification
Humans
Infant
Moraxella - enzymology - isolation & purification
Respiratory System - microbiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy
Rural Health
Streptococcus pneumoniae - enzymology - isolation & purification
Sweden
Urban health
beta-Lactamases - biosynthesis
Abstract
The occurrence of beta-lactamase production in Haemophilus influenzae, Branhamella catarrhalis and Moraxella nonliquefaciens was compared in 191 healthy children attending day nurseries in 2 municipalities differing with regard to the prescription rate of beta-lactam antibiotics. A significantly higher frequency of beta-lactamase production was recorded in M. nonliquefaciens isolated in the municipality with the higher prescription rate. A corresponding difference was not recorded for H. influenzae or B. catarrhalis. Approximately 75% of the nasopharyngeal pathogens H. influenzae, B. catarrhalis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as the commensal M. nonliquefaciens, were eliminated and often replaced by other strains of either species over a period of one month. Although none of the children were on antibiotics a substantial proportion of the acquired strains produced beta-lactamase. This suggested that the carrier rate of beta-lactamase producing strains of the respiratory tract is not only related to the effect of recent antibiotic treatment but also to the prevalence of such strains in the population.
PubMed ID
3261446 View in PubMed
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A case-control study of risk factors for urinary acquisition of Klebsiella pneumoniae producing CTX-M-15 in an outbreak situation in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145253
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2010 Jul;42(6-7):439-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Birgitta Lytsy
Johan Lindbäck
Erik Torell
Staffan Sylvan
Inga Velicko
Asa Melhus
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. birgitta.lytsy@akademiska.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2010 Jul;42(6-7):439-44
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Disease Outbreaks
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Female
Humans
Klebsiella Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - urine
Klebsiella pneumoniae - enzymology - isolation & purification
Logistic Models
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urine - microbiology
beta-Lactamases - biosynthesis - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
A retrospective case-control study was initiated at Uppsala University Hospital in 2006 during a major outbreak caused by a Klebsiella pneumoniae strain producing CTX-M-15. To identify risk factors associated with acquisition of the outbreak strain in the urinary tract, 52 case patients with a urine culture positive for the outbreak strain between 1 May and 31 December 2005 were enrolled. Case patients were matched 1:2 with concurrently hospitalized control patients with significant growth of susceptible Escherichia coli in a urine sample. Conditional logistic regression analyses identified hospital stay >or=9 days (odds ratio (OR) 18.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.74-61.2), nasogastric feeding tube (OR 18.0, 95% CI 2.28-142) and diarrhoea (OR 9.62, 95% CI 3.30-28.1) as risk factors with high ORs. The odds of previous use of cephalosporins were 7.58 (95% CI 3.13-18.4) times higher in case patients compared with the controls. Several multivariable models were evaluated to reduce bias from confounding. These models identified prolonged period of hospitalization, diarrhoea, malignancy and antibiotic use as the most important risk factors for acquisition of the outbreak strain, factors that are often found in elderly patients with a poor functional status.
PubMed ID
20180680 View in PubMed
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[Characteristics of respiratory allergoses in young children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16283
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1977 Jan-Feb;(1):3-4
Publication Type
Article

[Characteristics of the pentosephosphate cycle in children with pneumonia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44286
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1969 Jul-Aug;4:15-7
Publication Type
Article

Chlamydia pneumoniae in Swedish patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222285
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1993;25(4):429-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
B. Sundelöf
J. Gnarpe
H. Gnarpe
L. Grillner
S. Darougar
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Gävle Central Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1993;25(4):429-33
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Chlamydia Infections - enzymology - epidemiology - immunology
Chlamydophila pneumoniae - immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonia - enzymology - epidemiology - immunology
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Chlamydia pneumoniae infections have earlier been described as mycoplasma-like illnesses in young people, and also appear to be associated with community-acquired pneumonia in adults. In this retrospective study, 12.2% (23/188) of patients with pneumonia who required hospitalization during the 3 years 1985-87 had serological evidence of recent C. pneumoniae infection. Many of these patients had symptoms similar to ornithosis. The most interesting finding was that half of the patients with a 4-fold IgG antibody titre rise to C. pneumoniae also had an increased alkaline phosphatase concentration.
PubMed ID
8248741 View in PubMed
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Clinical and bacteriological effects of pivmecillinam for ESBL-producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae in urinary tract infections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264733
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2014 Mar;69(3):769-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Filip Jansåker
Niels Frimodt-Møller
Ingegerd Sjögren
Jenny Dahl Knudsen
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2014 Mar;69(3):769-72
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Amdinocillin Pivoxil - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Denmark
Escherichia coli - enzymology - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - drug therapy - microbiology - pathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Klebsiella Infections - drug therapy - microbiology - pathology
Klebsiella pneumoniae - enzymology - isolation & purification
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Questionnaires
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Tract Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Urine - microbiology
Young Adult
beta-Lactamases - secretion
Abstract
The prevalence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by extended-spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae is increasing and the therapeutic options are limited, especially in primary care. Recent indications have suggested pivmecillinam to be a suitable option. Here, we evaluated the clinical and bacteriological effects of pivmecillinam in UTIs caused by ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae.
We carried out a prospective follow-up of 39 patients diagnosed with UTI caused by ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, initiated on pivmecillinam. The patients were from general practice (n = 29) or admitted to hospitals (n = 10) in the Copenhagen area, Denmark (n = 30) or Halland, Sweden (n = 9). Both patients and physicians were asked to complete a questionnaire on the pretreatment signs and symptoms. Patients were asked to send in two more urine samples for culture examination, together with questionnaires for clinical effect, 2-6 and 10-20 days, respectively, after end of treatment.
Of the 39 patients included, 30 received a treatment regimen of 400 mg of pivmecillinam three times a day and 9 received 200 mg three times a day. All isolates were susceptible to mecillinam. The bacteriological cure rate was 79% (31/39); 80% (24/30) and 78% (7/9) for 400 and 200 mg three times a day, respectively. Relapse, i.e. ESBL-producing bacteria in the second control urine after previous bacteriological cure, was seen in five patients. Clinical cure was evaluable in 19 patients; 16 had a clinical effect (84%).
Pivmecillinam was proven bacteriologically and clinically effective for treatment of lower UTIs caused by ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae.
Notes
Comment In: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2014 Oct;69(10):2873-524917584
PubMed ID
24107388 View in PubMed
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Coincidental detection of the first outbreak of carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae colonisation in a primary care hospital, Finland, 2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267364
Source
Euro Surveill. 2015;20(26)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
M. Kanerva
K. Skogberg
K. Ryynänen
A. Pahkamäki
J. Jalava
J. Ollgren
E. Tarkka
O. Lyytikäinen
Source
Euro Surveill. 2015;20(26)
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacterial Proteins - secretion
Bacterial Typing Techniques - methods
Carrier State - epidemiology - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospital Bed Capacity, 100 to 299
Humans
Klebsiella Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Klebsiella pneumoniae - enzymology - genetics - isolation & purification
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Molecular Epidemiology
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Primary Health Care
Rectum - microbiology
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
beta-Lactamases - secretion
Abstract
In Finland, occurrence of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae (KPC-KP) has previously been sporadic and related to travel. We describe the first outbreak of colonisation with KPC-KP strain ST512; it affected nine patients in a 137-bed primary care hospital. The index case was detected by chance when a non-prescribed urine culture was taken from an asymptomatic patient with suprapubic urinary catheter in June 2013. Thereafter, all patients on the 38-bed ward were screened until two screening rounds were negative and extensive control measures were performed. Eight additional KPC-KP-carriers were found, and the highest prevalence of carriers on the ward was nine of 38. All other patients hospitalised on the outbreak ward between 1 May and 10 June and 101 former roommates of KPC-KP carriers since January had negative screening results. Two screening rounds on the hospital's other wards were negative. No link to travel abroad was detected. Compared with non-carriers, but without statistical significance, KPC-KP carriers were older (83 vs 76 years) and had more often received antimicrobial treatment within the three months before screening (9/9 vs 90/133). No clinical infections occurred during the six-month follow-up. Early detection, prompt control measures and repetitive screening were crucial in controlling the outbreak.
PubMed ID
26159309 View in PubMed
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Concurrent emergence of multidrug resistance and heat resistance by CTX-M-15-encoding conjugative plasmids in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121738
Source
APMIS. 2012 Sep;120(9):699-705
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Martin S Bojer
Anette M Hammerum
Steffen L Jørgensen
Frank Hansen
Stefan S Olsen
Karen A Krogfelt
Carsten Struve
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiological Surveillance and Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen S, Denmark.
Source
APMIS. 2012 Sep;120(9):699-705
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Conjugation, Genetic
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Humans
Klebsiella Infections - epidemiology - metabolism - microbiology
Klebsiella pneumoniae - enzymology - genetics - metabolism
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Nucleic Acid Hybridization
Plasmids - genetics
Retrospective Studies
beta-Lactamases - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
A plasmid-encoded ClpK protein was recently identified as a predictor of a heat-resistant phenotype in the opportunistic pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. This study was undertaken to evaluate the presence of the clpK gene in extended-spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL)-producing K. pneumoniae and to assess the probable co-transfer of multi-resistance with the heat resistance phenotype. A Danish collection of 80 ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae bloodstream infection isolates was screened for clpK by colony hybridization. Nineteen isolates (24%) were positive for clpK; some of them representing major clones identified in Denmark. Among these, nine isolates belonged to a single K. pneumoniae CTX-M-15 clone with sequence type (ST)16 exhibiting a heat-resistant phenotype. This clone has a multi-hospital occurrence and has also been detected outside Denmark. Horizontal co-transfer of multiple antibiotic resistances, including the CTX-M-15 resistance determinant, and the heat resistance phenotype was observed. Thus, the clpK gene is harbored by different ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates including a clone of ST16 internationally spread. The co-localization of clpK on transferable ESBL-encoding plasmids allowing co-dissemination of multiple drug resistance with bacterial heat resistance is a highly interesting phenomenon that may further complicate the prevention of spreading of certain successful clones of multi-resistant K. pneumoniae.
PubMed ID
22882258 View in PubMed
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32 records – page 1 of 4.