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15 records – page 1 of 2.

[Analysis of the causes of mortality in the immediate and long-term periods of follow-up of patients who underwent pulmonectomy for disseminates forms of tuberculosis of the lungs].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224877
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1992;(9-10):52-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992

Cardiac arrhythmias and myocardial ischemia after thoracotomy for lung cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224067
Source
Ann Thorac Surg. 1992 Apr;53(4):642-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
J. von Knorring
M. Lepäntalo
L. Lindgren
O. Lindfors
Author Affiliation
IV Department of Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Ann Thorac Surg. 1992 Apr;53(4):642-7
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - epidemiology
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology
Atrial Flutter - epidemiology
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Electrocardiography
Exercise Test
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Intraoperative Complications - epidemiology
Lung Neoplasms - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Pneumonectomy - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate
Tachycardia - epidemiology
Tachycardia, Supraventricular - epidemiology
Thoracotomy - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The records of 598 patients undergoing a thoracic surgical procedure for lung cancer from 1975 through 1989 were reviewed for occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias and myocardial ischemic events. Atrial tachycardias occurred in 16% (94/598); atrial fibrillation was preponderant (87%), followed by supraventricular tachycardia and atrial flutter. Patients with recurrent episodes of dysrhythmias had a significantly higher mortality rate than those without episodes or with a single episode only (17% versus 2.4%; p less than 0.01). Transient ischemic electrocardiographic changes were documented in 23 patients (3.8%) and myocardial infarction in 7 (1.2%). An abnormal preoperative exercise test result and intraoperative hypotension were strongly associated with both dysrhythmia and ischemia (p less than 0.01). Pneumonectomy, ischemic changes on the electrocardiogram, and cardiac enlargement were also associated with arrhythmias (p less than 0.01). A weaker association (p less than 0.05) was found between postoperative arrhythmias and old myocardial infarction (greater than 6 months), arterial hypertension, and heart failure. Pulmonary function had no predictive value in this respect. A history of angina or old myocardial infarction was predictive of transient postoperative myocardial ischemia but not myocardial infarction. Despite improved anesthetic and monitoring techniques and more frequent use of the intensive care unit postoperatively in the last decade, the incidence of arrhythmias after thoracotomy has not decreased. More effective prevention is needed, particularly for patients with defined preoperative and perioperative risk factors.
PubMed ID
1554274 View in PubMed
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Differences in operative mortality between high- and low-volume hospitals in Ontario for 5 major surgical procedures: estimating the number of lives potentially saved through regionalization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185206
Source
CMAJ. 2003 May 27;168(11):1409-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-27-2003
Author
David R Urbach
Chaim M Bell
Peter C Austin
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. david.urbach@ices.on.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2003 May 27;168(11):1409-14
Date
May-27-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - mortality - surgery
Cohort Studies
Colectomy - mortality - utilization
Colorectal Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Esophagectomy - mortality - utilization
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Research
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - standards
Ontario - epidemiology
Pancreaticoduodenectomy - mortality - utilization
Pneumonectomy - mortality - utilization
Regional Medical Programs - standards
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Surgery Department, Hospital - standards - utilization
Vascular Surgical Procedures - mortality - utilization
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Previous research has shown that persons undergoing certain high-risk surgical procedures at high-volume hospitals (HVHs) have a lower risk of postoperative death than those undergoing surgery at low-volume hospitals (LVHs). We estimated the absolute number of operative deaths that could potentially be avoided if 5 major surgical procedures in Ontario were restricted to HVHs.
We collected data on all persons who underwent esophagectomy (613), colon or rectal resection for colorectal cancer (18 898), pancreaticoduodenectomy (686), pulmonary lobectomy or pneumonectomy for lung cancer (5156) or repair of an unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) (6279) in Ontario from Apr. 1, 1994, to Mar. 31, 1999. We calculated the excess number of operative deaths (defined as deaths in the period from the day of the operation to 30 days thereafter), adjusted for age, sex and comorbidity, among the 75% of persons treated in LVHs, as compared with the 25% treated in the highest-volume quartile of hospitals. Bootstrap methods were used to estimate 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
Of the 31 632 persons undergoing any of the 5 procedures, 1341 (4.24%) died within 30 days of surgery. If the 75% of persons treated at the LVHs had instead been treated at the HVHs, the annual number of lives potentially saved would have been 4 (95% CI, 0 to 9) for esophagectomy, 6 (95% CI, 1 to 11) for pancreaticoduodenectomy, 1 (95% CI, -10 to 13) for major lung resection and 14 (95% CI, 1 to 25) for repair of unruptured AAA. For resection of colon or rectum, the regionalization strategy would not have saved any lives, and 17 lives (95% CI, 36 to -3) would potentially have been lost.
A small number of operative deaths are potentially avoidable by performing 4 of 5 complex surgical procedures only at HVHs in Ontario. In determining health policy, the most compelling argument for regionalizing complex surgical procedures at HVHs may not be the prevention of a large number of such deaths.
Notes
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Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2002 Sep 17;137(6):511-2012230353
PubMed ID
12771069 View in PubMed
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Experiences with the surgical treatment of elderly patients with carcinoma of the lung.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102833
Source
Acta Chir Scand Suppl. 1966;357:71-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966

Experiences with the surgical treatment of elderly patients with carcinoma of the lung.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112187
Source
Acta Chir Scand Suppl. 1966;357:71-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966
Author
T J Maamies
Source
Acta Chir Scand Suppl. 1966;357:71-4
Date
1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Middle Aged
Pneumonectomy - mortality
PubMed ID
5227101 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Life expectancy of lung cancer patients registered at the Leningrad City Oncological Dispensary in 1968].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245109
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1981;27(5):75-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
E Ia Drukin
S S Iaritsyn
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1981;27(5):75-80
Date
1981
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonectomy - mortality
Registries
Russia
Urban Population
Abstract
Out of 1,240 lung cancer patients, a five-year survival was registered in 5.2% of cases (0.5% of unoperated patients, 34.3% of radically-operated among those who underwent surgery and 39.5% of patients discharged from hospital after operation). No relationship between the sex and age unoperated patients and prognosis was established. Among those radically-operated, 34.8% of young all 28% of aged patients survived for five years. Resectability should be considered the only reliable criterion of evaluation of diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer.
PubMed ID
6454299 View in PubMed
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Lobectomy for non-small cell lung carcinoma: a nationwide study of short- and long-term survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289483
Source
Acta Oncol. 2017 Jul; 56(7):936-942
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
G N Oskarsdottir
H Halldorsson
M I Sigurdsson
B M Fridriksson
K Baldvinsson
A W Orrason
S Jonsson
M Planck
T Gudbjartsson
Author Affiliation
a Departments of Cardiothoracic Surgery , Landspitali University Hospital , Reykjavik , Iceland.
Source
Acta Oncol. 2017 Jul; 56(7):936-942
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - mortality - pathology - surgery
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - mortality - pathology - surgery
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - mortality - pathology - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iceland
Lung Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonectomy - mortality
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Abstract
Lobectomy is the standard curative treatment for non-small cell carcinoma (NSCLC) of the lung. Most studies on lobectomy have focused on short-term outcome and 30-day mortality. The aim of this study was to determine both short-term and long-term surgical outcome in all patients who underwent lobectomy for NSCLC in Iceland over a 24-year period.
The study involved 489 consecutive patients with NSCLC who underwent lobectomy with curative intent in Iceland, 1991-2014. Patient demographics, pTNM stage, rate of perioperative complications, and 30-day mortality were registered. Overall survival was analyzed with the Kaplan?Meier method. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to evaluate factors that were prognostic of overall mortality. To study trends in survival, the study period was divided into six 4-year periods. The median follow-up time was 42 months and no patients were lost to follow-up.
The average age of the patients was 67 years and 53.8% were female. The pTNM disease stage was IA in 148 patients (30.0%), IB in 125 patients (25.4%), IIA in 96 patients (19.5%), and IIB in 50 patients (10.1%), but 74 (15.0%) were found to be stage IIIA, most often diagnosed perioperatively. The total rate of major complications was 4.7%. Thirty-day mortality was 0.6% (three patients). One- and 5-year overall survival was 85.0% and 49.2%, respectively, with 3-year survival improving from 48.3% to 72.8% between the periods 1991-1994 and 2011-2014 (p?=?.0004). Advanced TNM stage and age were independent negative prognostic factors for all-cause mortality, and later calendar year and free surgical margins were independent predictors of improved survival.
The short-term outcome of lobectomy for NSCLC in this population-based study was excellent, as reflected in the low 30-day mortality and low rate of major complications. The long-term survival was acceptable and the overall 3-year survival had improved significantly during the study period.
PubMed ID
28325129 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lobectomy for non-small cell lung carcinoma: a nationwide study of short- and long-term survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289641
Source
Acta Oncol. 2017 Jul; 56(7):936-942
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
G N Oskarsdottir
H Halldorsson
M I Sigurdsson
B M Fridriksson
K Baldvinsson
A W Orrason
S Jonsson
M Planck
T Gudbjartsson
Author Affiliation
a Departments of Cardiothoracic Surgery , Landspitali University Hospital , Reykjavik , Iceland.
Source
Acta Oncol. 2017 Jul; 56(7):936-942
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - mortality - pathology - surgery
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - mortality - pathology - surgery
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - mortality - pathology - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iceland
Lung Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonectomy - mortality
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Abstract
Lobectomy is the standard curative treatment for non-small cell carcinoma (NSCLC) of the lung. Most studies on lobectomy have focused on short-term outcome and 30-day mortality. The aim of this study was to determine both short-term and long-term surgical outcome in all patients who underwent lobectomy for NSCLC in Iceland over a 24-year period.
The study involved 489 consecutive patients with NSCLC who underwent lobectomy with curative intent in Iceland, 1991-2014. Patient demographics, pTNM stage, rate of perioperative complications, and 30-day mortality were registered. Overall survival was analyzed with the Kaplan?Meier method. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to evaluate factors that were prognostic of overall mortality. To study trends in survival, the study period was divided into six 4-year periods. The median follow-up time was 42 months and no patients were lost to follow-up.
The average age of the patients was 67 years and 53.8% were female. The pTNM disease stage was IA in 148 patients (30.0%), IB in 125 patients (25.4%), IIA in 96 patients (19.5%), and IIB in 50 patients (10.1%), but 74 (15.0%) were found to be stage IIIA, most often diagnosed perioperatively. The total rate of major complications was 4.7%. Thirty-day mortality was 0.6% (three patients). One- and 5-year overall survival was 85.0% and 49.2%, respectively, with 3-year survival improving from 48.3% to 72.8% between the periods 1991-1994 and 2011-2014 (p?=?.0004). Advanced TNM stage and age were independent negative prognostic factors for all-cause mortality, and later calendar year and free surgical margins were independent predictors of improved survival.
The short-term outcome of lobectomy for NSCLC in this population-based study was excellent, as reflected in the low 30-day mortality and low rate of major complications. The long-term survival was acceptable and the overall 3-year survival had improved significantly during the study period.
PubMed ID
28325129 View in PubMed
Less detail

15 records – page 1 of 2.