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Achievement of healthy people 2010 objective for adult pneumococcal vaccination in an American Indian community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97145
Source
Public Health Rep. 2010 May-Jun;125(3):448-56
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marc S Traeger
Kenneth R Say
Verna Hastings
David A Yost
Author Affiliation
Whiteriver Service Unit, Indian Health Service, Whiteriver, AZ 85941, USA. marc.traeger@ihs.gov
Source
Public Health Rep. 2010 May-Jun;125(3):448-56
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arizona
Benchmarking
Health Plan Implementation
Healthy People Programs - organization & administration
Humans
Immunization Programs - organization & administration
Indians, North American
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pneumococcal Infections - prevention & control
Vaccination - utilization
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) causes significant mortality throughout the United States and greater mortality among American Indian/Alaska Natives. Vaccination reduces S. pneumoniae illness. We describe the methods used to achieve the Healthy People 2010 coverage rate goals for adult pneumococcal vaccine among those at high risk for severe disease in this population. METHODS: We implemented a pneumococcal vaccination project to bolster coverage followed by an ongoing multidisciplinary program. We used community, home, inpatient, and outpatient vaccinations without financial barriers together with data improvement, staff and patient education, standing orders, and electronic and printed vaccination reminders. We reviewed local and national coverage rates and queried our electronic database to determine coverage rates. RESULTS: In 2007, pneumococcal vaccination coverage rates among people > or = 65 years of age and among high-risk people aged 18-64 years were 96.0% and 61.2%, respectively, exceeding Healthy People 2010 goals. Government Performance and Results Act analyses reports revealed a 2.7-fold increase (36.0% to 98.0%) of coverage from 2000 to 2007 among people > or = 65 years of age at Whiteriver Service Unit in Whiteriver, Arizona. CONCLUSIONS: We achieved pneumococcal vaccination rates in targeted groups of an American Indian population that reached Healthy People 2010 goals and were higher than rates in other U.S. populations. Our program may be a useful model for other communities attempting to meet Healthy People 2010 goals.
PubMed ID
20433040 View in PubMed
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Association of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination with rates of ventilation tube insertion in Denmark: population-based register study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270804
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(6):e007151
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Christina Groth
Reimar W Thomsen
Therese Ovesen
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(6):e007151
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Denmark
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Ear Ventilation - statistics & numerical data
Otitis Media - therapy
Pneumococcal Infections - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage
Prospective Studies
Registries
Sex Factors
Vaccination
Vaccines, Conjugate - administration & dosage
Abstract
To examine if the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) in Denmark was associated with a decrease in the rate of ventilation tube (VT) insertions performed by office-based practising ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialists.
Population-based register study based on prospectively collected data.
Central Denmark Region. Data on VT insertions performed by any office-based practising ENT specialist in the region were collected from the National Health Service Registry.
All children below the age of 2 years with a first-time VT insertion from 2001 through 2011.
Age-stratified and gender-stratified standardised incidence rates of first-time VT insertion, and incidence rate ratio for PCV period 2008-2011 compared with pre-PCV period 2001-2007.
The annual incidence rate of first-time VT insertion in small children increased steadily from 64/1000 person-years in 2001 to 100/1000 person-years in 2011. The incidence rate ratio was 1.27 (95% CI 1.24 to 1.30) in the PCV period compared with the pre-PCV period.
The introduction of PCV into the Danish childhood immunisation programme in 2007 was not associated with a subsequent decrease in the rate of VT insertions among children below the age of 2 years. Instead, the rate continued to rise, as before the introduction of PCV.
Danish Data Protection Agency: 2007-58-0010.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26048205 View in PubMed
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[A vaccination would prevent invasive pneumococcal infections in adults].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209591
Source
Duodecim. 1997;113(8):689-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997

Clinical evaluation of new pneumococcal vaccines: the Finnish approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203621
Source
Dev Biol Stand. 1998;95:85-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
J. Eskola
A K Takala
T M Kilpi
K S Lankinen
H. Käyhty
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Dev Biol Stand. 1998;95:85-92
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Bacterial - biosynthesis
Bacterial Vaccines - adverse effects - immunology - pharmacology
Finland
Humans
Infant
Pneumococcal Infections - prevention & control
Safety
Streptococcus pneumoniae - immunology
Vaccines, Conjugate - pharmacology
Abstract
Clinical evaluation of a new vaccine should be based on information about the epidemiology and pathogenesis of the infection to be prevented, the protective immunity to this infection, and the immunological properties of the vaccine to be evaluated. In this review we describe one approach to evaluate a new vaccine, using our experience with pneumococcal conjugates as an example. Information on the epidemiology, pathogenesis and host responses was collected mainly during 1987-1992, improvement in diagnostic methods was carried out during 1990-1995, and the immunogenicity of vaccine candidates was tested during 1992-1995. Based on these factors, a randomized, controlled, blinded efficacy trial of two pneumococcal conjugate vaccines against acute otitis media was started in Finland in 1995. Enrolment of 2,497 infants has now been completed by April 1997, and the follow-up phase will continue until 1999.
PubMed ID
9855418 View in PubMed
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Effectiveness of pneumococcal Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine against pneumonia in children: A cluster-randomised trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298250
Source
Vaccine. 2018 09 18; 36(39):5891-5901
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-18-2018
Author
T M Kilpi
J Jokinen
T Puumalainen
H Nieminen
E Ruokokoski
H Rinta-Kokko
M Traskine
P Lommel
M Moreira
J Ruiz-Guinazu
D Borys
L Schuerman
A A Palmu
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Protection, National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O. Box 30, FI-00271 Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: terhi.kilpi@thl.fi.
Source
Vaccine. 2018 09 18; 36(39):5891-5901
Date
09-18-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Bacterial Proteins - genetics - immunology
Carrier Proteins - genetics - immunology
Double-Blind Method
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Haemophilus influenzae
Humans
Immunization Schedule
Immunoglobulin D - genetics - immunology
Infant
Lipoproteins - genetics - immunology
Male
Otitis Media - microbiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Infections - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - therapeutic use
Pneumonia - prevention & control
Abstract
Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines have potential to prevent significant proportion of childhood pneumonia. Finnish Invasive Pneumococcal disease vaccine trial was designed to assess the vaccine effectiveness (VE) of the 10-valent pneumococcal Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV10) against several outcomes. We now report results for pneumonia.
In this nationwide, cluster-randomised, double-blind trial, children younger than 19?months received PHiD-CV10 in 52 clusters or hepatitis vaccines as control in 26 clusters. Infants younger than 7?months at the first vaccination received either 3+1 or 2+1 vaccination schedule, children aged 7-11?months received 2+1, and those 12-18?months of age two-dose schedule. All hospitalizations and outpatient visits to hospital associated with ICD-10 codes compatible with pneumonia were identified through the National Care Register and 1-3 frontal chest X-ray images per event were collected. External readers who were unaware of the patients' vaccination status retrospectively interpreted the images. The evaluated outcomes were hospital-diagnosed, hospital-treated pneumonia as primary diagnosis, and radiologically confirmed pneumonia during the blinded, intention-to-treat follow-up period from the first vaccination to the end of 2011. Total VE was calculated as 1 minus rate ratio of all pneumonia episodes.
47 366 children were enrolled from February 2009, to October 2010. VE against all episodes of hospital-diagnosed pneumonia was 27% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 14%, 38%), 32% (95% CI: 3%, 52%), and 23% (95% CI: -5%, 44%) in subjects enrolled at age
PubMed ID
30145098 View in PubMed
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[Efficacy and safety of azithromycin prophylaxis of respiratory tract infections in military community].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176068
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 2004;49(8-9):34-5, 37-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
I A Guchev
O I Klochkov
G V Ivanitsa
Iu A Pervov
S M Shturmina
S V Rosman
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 2004;49(8-9):34-5, 37-42
Date
2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adolescent
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
Azithromycin - administration & dosage - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Carrier State - prevention & control
Clindamycin - pharmacology
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Erythromycin - pharmacology
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Military Personnel
Nasopharyngeal Diseases - prevention & control
Penicillins - pharmacology
Pneumococcal Infections - prevention & control
Respiratory Tract Infections - prevention & control
Russia
Streptococcus pneumoniae - drug effects - isolation & purification
Abstract
The efficacy and safety of azithromycin prophylaxis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in young adults in a military training centre of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation located in the Central European Region of Russia were studied. Two prophylactic regimens with azithromycin vs. the control were evaluated: azithromycin, 500 mg/w for 8 weeks (R1), azithromycin, 1500 mg once upon the enrolment (R2) and no drugs (R3). Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcuspneumoniae and its susceptibility to antibacterials were estimated thrice: before the exposure, after the exposure within the 9th week and after the exposure within the 20th week. The MLS(B) phenotype was suspected when the isolates were resistant to erythromycin and clindamycin. During the observation period of 22 weeks CAP was diagnosed in 20.2% of 678 subjects in group R3, 8.6% of 508 subjects in group R1 (Risk Ratio =0.4, 95% Cl = 0.3-0.6) and 10.3% of 507 subjects in group R2 (Risk Ratio = 0.5, 95% Cl = 0.4-0.7). The S.pneumoniae carriage rate at visit 0 was 34-35%, within the 9th week it was 75, 66 and 50% (p
PubMed ID
15727144 View in PubMed
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Efficacy of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in large scale field trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198783
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2000 Apr;19(4):394-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
H R Shinefield
S. Black
Author Affiliation
Vaccine Study Center, Kaiser Permanente Vaccine Study Center, Oakland, CA 94611, USA. henry.shinefield@KP1OR5.org
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2000 Apr;19(4):394-7
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bacterial Vaccines - administration & dosage
California
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Trials as Topic
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Male
Pneumococcal Infections - prevention & control
Prognosis
Streptococcus pneumoniae - immunology
Vaccination
Vaccines, Conjugate - administration & dosage
Abstract
Each year Streptococcus pneumoniae causes approximately 1.2 million deaths worldwide from pneumonia. In the United States S. pneumoniae is estimated to cause 500,000 cases of pneumonia and 7 million episodes of acute otitis media annually.
The current pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine is ineffective in children
PubMed ID
10783042 View in PubMed
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50 records – page 1 of 5.