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188 records – page 1 of 19.

33 cases of airsoft gun pellet ocular injuries in Copenhagen, Denmark, 1998-2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79973
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2006 Dec;84(6):755-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Saunte Jon Peiter
Saunte Mads Egil
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. jonpeiter@saunte.com
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2006 Dec;84(6):755-8
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Eye Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Firearms
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Play and Playthings - injuries
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Wounds, Nonpenetrating - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the incidence and ocular effects of blunt trauma due to injury from airsoft gun pellets. METHODS: We conducted a non-comparative case series based on the files of 33 patients who suffered ocular injury from airsoft guns and were admitted to one university emergency eye clinic in Copenhagen during a 5-year period. RESULTS: A total of 33 eyes in 33 patients were examined. Thirty male and three female patients were affected. Mean age was 13 years (range 3-49 years). Mean follow-up time was 6.5 days (range 1-540 days). On initial examination, we found: hyphaema (n = 28), corneal abrasion (n = 22), retinal oedema (n = 11), subconjunctival haemorrhage (n = 10), palpebral haemorrhage and/or oedema (n = 9), iris dialysis (n = 7), intraocular pressure (IOP) > 31 mmHg (n = 4), IOP
PubMed ID
17083533 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Accidents caused by inflatable bouncers in 0-19 year-olds in Denmark in 1993]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34830
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Apr 15;158(16):2251-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1996
Author
K. Kirketerp-Møller
N. Balslev
M. Lohmann
Author Affiliation
Sundhedsstyrelsen, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Apr 15;158(16):2251-3
Date
Apr-15-1996
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Play and Playthings
Retrospective Studies
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The paper describes the epidemiology of accidents caused by inflatable bouncers. The estimated number of bouncers and bouncing castles in DK was 300-350 in 1993. The data were extracted from the Danish part of the EHLASS project ("the European Home and Leisure Accident Surveillance System). The project registers injuries in five Danish casualty wards, covering a total uptake area of 14.2% of the Danish population. In 1993, there were 91 injuries caused by inflatable bouncers, 37% of them in boys, and 63% in girls. Seventy-nine percent of the injuries were caused by falling, 19% by contact with an object or another person and 2% stress injuries. The type of injury were: bruises 42%, fractures 31%, distorsions 23%, and tendon/muscle strains 3%. The location of the fractures were: one in the spine, two in the clavicle, all other (25) were located in the limbs. Four patients had to be admitted for further observation or treatment. The average cost per injury was 839 dKr., or aprox 150 US$. It does not seem necessary to take special precautions or make restrictions in the use of this new playground article.
PubMed ID
8650798 View in PubMed
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[Accidents in day care institutions in Denmark during the 1990's]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32303
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Feb 19;163(8):1078-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-2001
Author
M. Kruse
Author Affiliation
Statens Institut for Folkesundhed, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Feb 19;163(8):1078-82
Date
Feb-19-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Child Day Care Centers - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Injury Severity Score
Male
Nurseries - statistics & numerical data
Play and Playthings - injuries
Registries
Sex Factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: This paper analyses the development in the incidence of injuries in day care institutions for children below school age in Denmark 1989-1997. MATERIAL: Data on injuries were collected from the injury register, which covers around 15 per cent of the Danish population. The population data derive from Statistics Denmark. METHOD: Incidence patterns were analysed by means of linear regressions and comparisons of means. RESULTS: Injuries in day care institutions for children below school age have increased sharply during the 1990s. In children aged 1-6, the 3-6-year-olds had a higher incidence and the boys a significantly higher incidence of injury than the girls. DISCUSSION: The increase in injuries is to some extent explained by a higher attendance at day care institutions. The hypothesis that the rising incidence is partly due to an increase in the tendency to seek emergency department treatment in the event of minor injuries cannot be ruled out, as minor injuries almost solely account for the rise.
PubMed ID
11242666 View in PubMed
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[Accidents with playground equipment. II. Severity of the lesions classified by an injury scale (Abbreviated Injury Scale)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40316
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1982 Nov 29;144(48):3565-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-29-1982

Adapting and enhancing PAX Good Behavior Game for First Nations communities: a mixed-methods study protocol developed with Swampy Cree Tribal Council communities in Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294532
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 02 15; 8(2):e018454
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-15-2018
Author
Janique Fortier
Mariette Chartier
Sarah Turner
Nora Murdock
Frank Turner
Jitender Sareen
Tracie O Afifi
Laurence Y Katz
Marni Brownell
James Bolton
Brenda Elias
Corinne Isaak
Roberta Woodgate
Depeng Jiang
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 02 15; 8(2):e018454
Date
02-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude
Child
Child Behavior
Child Behavior Disorders - ethnology - prevention & control
Cultural Competency
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Manitoba
Mental health
Play and Playthings
Program Evaluation
Research Design
Residence Characteristics
Reward
School Health Services
Schools
Social Behavior
Social Behavior Disorders - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
High rates of mental health problems, such as suicidal behaviours, among First Nations youth in Canada are a major public health concern. The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a school-based intervention that provides a nurturing environment for children and has been shown to promote positive outcomes. PAX Good Behavior Game (PAX GBG) is an adaptation and enhancement of the GBG. While PAX GBG has been implemented in Indigenous communities, little research exists examining the cultural and contextual appropriateness and effectiveness of the intervention in First Nations communities.
The present paper describes a protocol of the mixed-methods approach guided by an Indigenous ethical engagement model adopted to implement, adapt and evaluate PAX GBG in First Nations communities in Manitoba, Canada. First, implementation outcomes (eg, acceptability, adoption) of PAX GBG will be evaluated using qualitative interviews with teachers, principals and community members from Swampy Cree Tribal Council (SCTC) communities. Second, by linking administrative databases to programme data from schools in 38 First Nations communities, we will compare PAX GBG and control groups to evaluate whether PAX GBG is associated with improved mental health and academic outcomes. Third, the qualitative results will help inform a cultural and contextual adaptation of PAX GBG called First Nations PAX (FN PAX). Fourth, FN PAX will be implemented in a few SCTC communities and evaluated using surveys and qualitative interviews followed by the remaining communities the subsequent year.
Ethical approval was obtained from the University of Manitoba Health Research Ethics Board and will be obtained from the Health Information Privacy Committee and respective data providers for the administrative database linkages. Dissemination and knowledge translation will include community and stakeholder engagement throughout the research process, reports and presentations for policymakers and community members, presentations at scientific conferences and journal publications.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29449291 View in PubMed
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[A foreign body in the respiratory tract--a diagnostic problem at Christmas time]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59903
Source
Lakartidningen. 1989 Dec 20;86(51):4528-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-20-1989

188 records – page 1 of 19.