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53 records – page 1 of 6.

Anthropogenic microlitter in the Baltic Sea water column.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294565
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Apr; 129(2):918-923
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Andrei Bagaev
Liliya Khatmullina
Irina Chubarenko
Author Affiliation
Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 36, Nahimovskiy prospekt, Moscow 117997, Russia. Electronic address: andrei.bagaev@atlantic.ocean.ru.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Apr; 129(2):918-923
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Baltic States
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Particle Size
Plastics - analysis
Poland
Russia
Seawater - chemistry
Waste Products - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Microlitter (0.5-5mm) concentrations in water column (depth range from 0 to 217.5m) of the main Baltic Proper basins are reported. In total, 95 water samples collected in 6 research cruises in 2015-2016 in the Bornholm, Gdansk, and Gotland basins were analysed. Water from 10- and 30-litre Niskin bathometers was filtered through the 174µm filters, and the filtrate was examined under optical microscope (40×). The bulk mean concentration was 0.40±0.58 items per litre, with fibres making 77% of them. Other types of particles are the paint flakes (19%) and fragments (4%); no microbeads or pellets. The highest concentrations are found in the near-bottom samples from the coastal zone (2.2-2.7 items per litre max) and from near-surface waters (0.5m) in the Bornholm basin (5 samples, 1.6-2.5 items per litre). Distribution of particles over depths, types, and geographical regions is presented.
PubMed ID
29106941 View in PubMed
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Are ingested plastics a vector of PCB contamination in northern fulmars from coastal Newfoundland and Labrador?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303184
Source
Environ Res. 2018 11; 167:184-190
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2018
Author
J F Provencher
S Avery-Gomm
M Liboiron
B M Braune
J B Macaulay
M L Mallory
R J Letcher
Author Affiliation
Biology Department, Acadia University, 15 University Drive, Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada B4P 2R6. Electronic address: jennifer.provencher@acadiau.ca.
Source
Environ Res. 2018 11; 167:184-190
Date
11-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Birds
Canada
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants
Environmental pollution
Gastrointestinal Contents
Liver - chemistry
Newfoundland and Labrador
Plastics - analysis - toxicity
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
While marine animals are exposed to environmental contaminants via their prey, because plastic pollution in the aquatic environment can concentrate some chemicals, ingested plastics are thought to increase the exposure of biota to contaminants. Currently, in the literature there are contradictory results relating to how higher levels of ingested plastics by birds may lead to higher levels of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs). To date none of these have incorporated known Toxic Equivalency Factors (TEFs) for non-ortho and mono-ortho congeners of PCB which is critical to assessing the potential effects from PCBs. We examined northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) from the Labrador Sea region Canada, and the ingested plastics from these same birds for comparative PCB concentrations. We found no significant correlations between the PCB concentrations in the birds and the mass or number of retained ingested plastic pieces in the stomach, this held true when PCBs were considered by a number of different ways, including ?4PCB, ?PCB, lower-chlorinated, high-chlorinated, non-ortho PCB, and mono-ortho congeners. PCB concentrations were lower in plastics as compared with livers. We found significant differences in congener profiles between the ingested plastics and seabird livers suggesting that while plastics do not contribute to the PCB concentrations, there may be some interactions between plastics and the chemicals that the birds are exposed to via ingested plastics.
PubMed ID
30032001 View in PubMed
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Are ocean conditions and plastic debris resulting in a 'double whammy' for marine birds?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295835
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Aug; 133:684-692
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
Mark C Drever
Jennifer F Provencher
Patrick D O'Hara
Laurie Wilson
Victoria Bowes
Carita M Bergman
Author Affiliation
Environment and Climate Change Canada, Canadian Wildlife Service, Delta, British Columbia, Canada. Electronic address: mark.drever@canada.ca.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Aug; 133:684-692
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animal Migration
Animals
British Columbia
Charadriiformes
Dietary Exposure
Ecotoxicology - methods
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Gastrointestinal Contents
Oceans and Seas
Plastics - analysis - toxicity
Waste Products - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
We report a mortality event of Red Phalaropes (Phalaropus fulicarius) that occurred from October to November 2016 on the north coast of British Columbia, Canada. All individuals were severely underweight and showing signs of physiological stress. The guts of all carcasses contained ingested plastics (100%, n?=?9). Distribution modelling from pelagic bird surveys (1990-2010) indicated that Red Phalaropes are not typically found in the study area during fall months. Ocean conditions during fall 2016 were unusually warm, coinciding with reduced upwelling in the study area. eBird records since 1980 indicated Red Phalaropes are observed closer to shore during periods associated with reduced upwelling. These results suggest that distribution shifts of Red Phalaropes closer to shore, where plastic debris occurs in higher concentrations, may lead phalaropes to feed on plastic debris while in a weakened state, resulting in a combination of two adverse circumstances.
PubMed ID
30041365 View in PubMed
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Citizen science for better management: Lessons learned from three Norwegian beach litter data sets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299095
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2019 Jan; 138:364-375
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Jannike Falk-Andersson
Boris Woody Berkhout
Tenaw Gedefaw Abate
Author Affiliation
SALT Lofoten, P.O. Box 91, 8301 Svolvaer, Norway. Electronic address: jannike@salt.nu.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2019 Jan; 138:364-375
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Bathing Beaches
Environmental monitoring
Norway
Plastics - analysis
Waste Products - analysis
Water Pollutants - analysis
Water Pollution
Abstract
Increased plastic consumption and poor waste management have resulted in litter representing an ever-increasing threat to the marine environment. To identify sources and evaluate mitigation measures, beach litter has been monitored. Using data from two citizen science protocols (CSPs) and OSPAR monitoring of Norwegian beaches, this study 1) identifies the most abundant litter types, 2) compares OSPAR to citizen science data, and 3) examines how to improve the management relevance of beach litter data. The dominant litter types were; food and drink- and fishery related items, and unidentifiable plastic pieces. Data from CSPs are consistent with OSPAR data in abundance and diversity, although few OSPAR beaches limit verification of CSP data. In contrast to OSPAR, the CSPs estimate the weight of the litter. CSPs lack important variables which could explain why some litter types are abundant in some particular areas. The latter could be improved by recording GPS positions.
PubMed ID
30660285 View in PubMed
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Citizen scientists reveal: Marine litter pollutes Arctic beaches and affects wild life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293056
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2017 Dec 15; 125(1-2):535-540
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-15-2017
Author
Melanie Bergmann
Birgit Lutz
Mine B Tekman
Lars Gutow
Author Affiliation
Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Am Handelshafen 12, 27570 Bremerhaven, Germany. Electronic address: Melanie.Bergmann@awi.de.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2017 Dec 15; 125(1-2):535-540
Date
Dec-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Wild
Bathing Beaches
Ecosystem
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental pollution
Fisheries
Humans
Plastics - analysis
Seawater
Svalbard
Volunteers
Waste Products - analysis
Abstract
Recent data indicate accumulation areas of marine litter in Arctic waters and significant increases over time. Beaches on remote Arctic islands may be sinks for marine litter and reflect pollution levels of the surrounding waters particularly well. We provide the first quantitative data from surveys carried out by citizen scientists on six beaches of Svalbard. Litter quantities recorded by cruise tourists varied from 9-524gm-2 and were similar to those from densely populated areas. Plastics accounted for >80% of the overall litter, most of which originated from fisheries. Photographs provided by citizens show deleterious effects of beach litter on Arctic wildlife, which is already under strong pressure from global climate change. Our study highlights the potential of citizen scientists to provide scientifically valuable data on the pollution of sensitive remote ecosystems. The results stress once more that current legislative frameworks are insufficient to tackle the pollution of Arctic ecosystems.
PubMed ID
28964499 View in PubMed
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Concentrations of phthalates and bisphenol A in Norwegian foods and beverages and estimated dietary exposure in adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259320
Source
Environ Int. 2014 Dec;73:259-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Amrit K Sakhi
Inger Therese L Lillegaard
Stefan Voorspoels
Monica H Carlsen
Elin B Løken
Anne L Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Helle M Meltzer
Cathrine Thomsen
Source
Environ Int. 2014 Dec;73:259-69
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Benzhydryl Compounds - analysis
Beverages - analysis
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Food analysis
Humans
Norway
Phenols - analysis
Phthalic Acids - analysis
Plasticizers - analysis
Abstract
Phthalates and bisphenol A (BPA) are ubiquitous in our environment. These chemicals have been characterized as endocrine disruptors that can cause functional impairment of development and reproduction. Processed and packaged foods are among the major sources of human exposure to these chemicals. No previous report showing the levels of these chemicals in food items purchased in Norway is available. The aim of the present study was to determine the concentration of ten different phthalates and BPA in foods and beverages purchased on the Norwegian market and estimate the daily dietary exposure in the Norwegian adult population. Commonly consumed foods and beverages in Norway were purchased in a grocery store and analysed using gas- and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Daily dietary exposures to these chemicals in the Norwegian adult population were estimated using the latest National dietary survey, Norkost 3 (2010-2011). This study showed that phthalates and BPA are found in all foods and beverages that are common to consume in Norway. The detection frequency of phthalates in the food items varied from 11% for dicyclohexyl phthalate (DCHP) to 84% for di-iso-nonyl phthalate (DiNP), one of the substitutes for bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). BPA was found in 54% of the food items analysed. Among the different phthalates, the highest concentrations were found for DEHP and DiNP in the food items. Estimated dietary exposures were also equally high and dominated by DEHP and DiNP (400-500 ng/kg body weight (bw)/day), followed by di-iso-butyl phthalate (DiBP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DnOP) and di-iso-decyl phthalate (DiDP) (30-40 ng/kg bw/day). Dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethylphthalate (DEP) and DCHP had the lowest concentrations and the exposures were around 10-20 ng/kg bw/day. Estimated dietary exposure to BPA was 5 ng/kg bw/day. In general, levels of phthalates and BPA in foods and beverages from the Norwegian market are comparable to other countries worldwide. Grain and meat products were the major contributors of exposure to these chemicals in the Norwegian adult population. The estimated dietary exposures to these chemicals were considerably lower than their respective tolerable daily intake (TDI) values established by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA).
PubMed ID
25173060 View in PubMed
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Correlations between phthalate metabolites in urine, serum, and seminal plasma from young Danish men determined by isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140989
Source
J Anal Toxicol. 2010 Sep;34(7):400-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Hanne Frederiksen
Niels Jørgensen
Anna-Maria Andersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. hanne.01.frederiksen@rh.regionh.dk
Source
J Anal Toxicol. 2010 Sep;34(7):400-10
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - analysis
Chromatography, Liquid - methods
Denmark
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Male
Phthalic Acids - analysis - metabolism
Plasticizers - analysis - metabolism
Semen - chemistry
Tandem Mass Spectrometry - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Phthalates are suspected of endocrine disrupting effects. We aimed to develop an analytical method for simultaneous determination of several phthalate metabolites in human urine, serum, and seminal plasma and to study correlations between levels of metabolites in these matrices. Thirteen metabolites were determined in samples from 60 young Danish men. Metabolites of common di-ester phthalates were detected in most urine samples. Summed di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) metabolites were excreted in urine in the highest amount (median = 91.1 ng/mL), followed by monoethyl phthalate (MEP), mono-iso-butyl phthalate (MiBP), mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP), mono-benzyl phthalate (MBzP), and finally summed di-isononyl phthalate (DiNP) metabolites. All these metabolite levels correlated significantly, indicating that when a participant was highly exposed to one phthalate he was also highly exposed to other phthalates. Several metabolites were also detectable in serum and in seminal plasma, although in much lower levels. Significant correlations between MEP and MiBP levels in serum and urine were observed, showing that serum levels could be used as biomarkers of human exposure. For DEHP and DiNP metabolites, correlations between urine and serum levels were only observed for mono(2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl) phthalate (MECPP) and mono-(4-methyl-7-carboxyheptyl) phthalate (MCiOP), indicating that these secondary carboxylated metabolites were better serum markers than primary metabolites [mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) and mono-iso-nonyl phthalate (MiNP)]. In seminal plasma, only MEP levels correlated significantly to levels in urine and in serum.
PubMed ID
20822678 View in PubMed
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Di-(2-ethylhexyl) adipate in selected total diet food composite samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106241
Source
J Food Prot. 2013 Nov;76(11):1985-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Xu-Liang Cao
Wendy Zhao
Robin Churchill
Robert Dabeka
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Chemical Safety, Food Directorate, Health Canada, 251 Sir Frederick Banting Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9. xu-liang.cao@hc-sc.gc.ca.
Source
J Food Prot. 2013 Nov;76(11):1985-8
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipates - adverse effects - analysis - chemistry
Beverages - analysis
Canada
Cheese - analysis
Food contamination - analysis
Food Packaging - instrumentation - methods
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Humans
Meat - analysis
Plasticizers - analysis
Polyvinyl Chloride - adverse effects - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) food-wrapping films plasticized with di-(2-ethylhexyl) adipate (DEHA) are commonly used by grocery stores in Canada to rewrap meat, poultry, fish, cheese, and other foods. DEHA was assessed as part of the Government of Canada's Chemicals Management Plan. The main source of exposure for most age groups was expected to be food. Although the margin of exposure from food and beverages is considered to be adequately protective, the Government of Canada committed to performing targeted surveys of DEHA in foods and food packaging materials to better define Canadian exposure to DEHA through dietary intake. In order to determine whether more-comprehensive targeted surveys on DEHA in foods should be conducted, 26 food composite samples from the 2011 Canadian total diet study were selected and analyzed for DEHA using a method based on solvent and dispersive solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. These 26 food composites include cheese, meat, poultry, fish, and fast foods, and PVC films were likely used in packaging the individual foods used to make the composites. DEHA was detected in most of the meat, poultry, and fish composite samples, with the highest concentration found in ground beef (11 µg/g), followed by beef steak (9.9 µg/g), freshwater fish (7.8 µg/g), poultry liver pâté (7.4 µg/g), fresh pork (6.9 µg/g), cold cuts and luncheon meats (2.8 µg/g), veal cutlets (2.1 µg/g), roast beef (1.3 µg/g), lamb (1.2 µg/g), and organ meats (0.20 µg/g). Targeted surveys should be conducted to investigate the presence of DEHA in various foods packaged with PVC films in more detail and provide updated occurrence data for accurate human exposure assessment.
PubMed ID
24215707 View in PubMed
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Different stories told by small and large microplastics in sediment - first report of microplastic concentrations in an urban recipient in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300124
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2019 Apr; 141:501-513
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Marte Haave
Claudia Lorenz
Sebastian Primpke
Gunnar Gerdts
Author Affiliation
NORCE Norwegian Research Centre, P.O.B 7810, 5020 Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: marte.haave@norceresearch.no.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2019 Apr; 141:501-513
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Estuaries
Geologic Sediments - analysis - chemistry
Norway
Nylons - analysis
Particle Size
Plastics - analysis
Polyurethanes - analysis
Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared
Waste Water
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Microplastics (MP) in sediments from discharge sites for wastewater and deposition sites in deep regions in an urban fjord in Norway were extracted by density separation in a Microplastic Sediment Separator with ZnCl2. Particles (>11?µm) were identified using FTIR. Twenty different polymer types were identified, at concentrations from 12,000 to 200,000 particles kg-1 dw. Over 95% of the MP were smaller than 100?µm. High deposition of small MP agreed with known areas for organic deposition. Polyurethane acrylate resins dominated the small MP while polyamide fibers dominated the larger MP. Particles >500?µm showed different maximum concentrations and spatial distribution from the smaller particles. This study is the first to report concentration ranges of identified plastic particles from a Norwegian fjord, down to sizes below the limit of visual identification. The results provides a baseline for future comparison, and point at relevant sizes for environmental risk assessments.
PubMed ID
30955761 View in PubMed
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Distribution and impacts of microplastic incorporation within sea ice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308731
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2019 Aug; 145:463-473
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2019
Author
N-X Geilfus
K M Munson
J Sousa
Y Germanov
S Bhugaloo
D Babb
F Wang
Author Affiliation
Centre for Earth Observation Science and Department of Environment and Geography, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2, Canada. Electronic address: Nicolas-Xavier.Geilfus@umanitoba.ca.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2019 Aug; 145:463-473
Date
Aug-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Baltic States
Environmental monitoring
Ice Cover - chemistry
Plastics - analysis
Seawater - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Microplastics (plastic particles
PubMed ID
31590811 View in PubMed
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53 records – page 1 of 6.