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[A comparative analysis of the Salmonella typhi strains isolated from patients and bacterial carriers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70360
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1989 Dec;(12):8-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1989
Author
L E Riabchenko
L A Riapis
L M Sladkova
E I Vostrova
Iu V Kravtsov
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1989 Dec;(12):8-11
Date
Dec-1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Bacteriophage Typing
Carrier State - microbiology
Comparative Study
Drug Resistance, Microbial
English Abstract
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Molecular Weight
Plasmids - genetics
Salmonella typhi - classification - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Typhoid Fever - microbiology
Ukraine
Virulence
Abstract
The comparative analysis of 133 S. typhi clinical strains isolated from patients and carriers in Dnepropetrovsk Province in 1978-1987 was carried out. As shown by this analysis, 10 Vi phage types were represented in the set of strains under study, phage types A and F1 being the most numerous ones. Phage type F1 occurred less frequently among the strains isolated from carriers. 31.1% of the strains were found to contain plasmids with different molecular weight ranging from 96 to 0.5 MD. The occurrence of plasmid-containing strains remained at the same level during the whole period under study. Low-molecular plasmids occurred more frequently in the strains isolated from carriers. The minimal suppressive concentrations of a number of antibiotics, such as penicillin, ampicillin, monomycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, rifampicin and streptomycin, were determined. 7% of the strains were resistant to penicillin, 9% to monomycin, 15%--to tetracycline and 2.6% to chloramphenicol. The correlation between penicillin and monomycin resistance of the strains and the presence of the plasmid with a molecular weight of 60 MD in these strains was established. All strains were shown to be highly variable in the degree of their virulence: from 10(2) to 10(8). The strains isolated from patients possessed greater virulence.
PubMed ID
2629429 View in PubMed
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Ambler class A extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. in Canadian hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180913
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2004 Apr;48(4):1204-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Michael R Mulvey
Elizabeth Bryce
David Boyd
Marianna Ofner-Agostini
Sara Christianson
Andrew E Simor
Shirley Paton
Author Affiliation
Nosocomial Infections, National Microbiology Laboratory, Health Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba. michael_mulvey@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2004 Apr;48(4):1204-14
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Canada - epidemiology
Chromosome Mapping
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Escherichia coli - drug effects - enzymology
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Klebsiella - drug effects - enzymology
Klebsiella Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Molecular Sequence Data
Phenotype
Plasmids - genetics
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Transformation, Bacterial - genetics
beta-Lactamases - biosynthesis - genetics
Abstract
This report describes a study carried out to gain baseline information on the molecular characteristics of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. in Canada. A total of 29,323 E. coli and 5,156 Klebsiella sp. isolates were screened at 12 participating sites. Of these, 505 clinically significant, nonrepeat isolates displaying reduced susceptibility to the NCCLS-recommended beta-lactams were submitted to a central laboratory over a 1-year period ending on 30 September 2000. A total of 116 isolates were confirmed to be ESBL producers. PCR and sequence analysis revealed the presence of TEM-11 (n = 1), TEM-12 (n = 1), TEM-29 (n = 1), TEM-52 (n = 4), CTX-M-13 (n = 1), CTX-M-14 (n = 15), CTX-M-15 (n = 11), SHV-2 (n = 2), SHV-2a (n = 12), SHV-5 (n = 6), SHV-12 (n = 45), and SHV-30 (n = 2). Five novel beta-lactamases were identified and designated TEM-115 (n = 2), TEM-120 (n = 1), SHV-40 (n = 2), SHV-41 (n = 4), and SHV-42 (n = 1). In addition, no molecular mechanism was identified for five isolates displaying an ESBL phenotype. Macrorestriction analysis of all ESBL isolates was conducted, as was restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of plasmids harboring ESBLs. Although a "clonal" distribution of isolates was observed at some individual sites, there was very little evidence suggesting intrahospital spread. In addition, examples of identical or closely related plasmids that were identified at geographically distinct sites across Canada are given. However, there was considerable diversity with respect to plasmid types observed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15047521 View in PubMed
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An academic centre for gene therapy research with clinical grade manufacturing capability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7678
Source
Ann Med. 1997 Dec;29(6):579-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
K B Islam
P. Blomberg
K. Wikström
C I Smith
Author Affiliation
Center for Gene Therapy Research, Huddinge University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Sweden. Khalid.Islam@kfcmail.hs.sll.se
Source
Ann Med. 1997 Dec;29(6):579-83
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Vaccines
Academic Medical Centers
Angioplasty, Balloon
Arterial Occlusive Diseases - prevention & control - therapy
Clinical Trials
Communicable Diseases - therapy
Cystic Fibrosis - therapy
Gene Therapy
Genetic Diseases, Inborn - therapy
Genetic Vectors
HIV-1 - genetics - immunology
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Neoplasms - therapy
Plasmids
Recurrence
Research
Retroviridae - genetics
Schools, Medical
Sweden
Vaccines, Synthetic
Abstract
Huddinge University Hospital is a major teaching hospital affiliated with the Karolinska Institute in Southern Stockholm. For the past few years several groups have been working there in different areas of gene therapy relating to cancer, genetic and infectious diseases. However, a facility to produce clinical grade material under good manufacturing practice was lacking. To this end, Huddinge University Hospital has taken the initiative to open a Gene Therapy Research Center in 1996. This facility, which is unique of its kind in Scandinavia, is located in the Novum Research Park, Huddinge, and is a part of the existing Clinical Research Center. The newly built centre will allow clinicians and researchers to develop and produce vectors (viral and nonviral) for clinical trials and do basic research to understand the mechanisms of diseases. Although the centre will primarily serve the academic institutions it will also extend its facilities to other investigators in this field. The production unit is run in collaboration with the Faculty of Medicine, University of Lund. On-going projects include production of plasmid vectors for prevention of postangioplasty restenosis, DNA vaccine for HIV-1, cationic liposome DNA complexes for cystic fibrosis and retroviral vectors for HIV-1.
PubMed ID
9562528 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of complete sequence of cryptic plasmid pTP33 from Yersinia pestis isolated in Tuva natural focus of plague].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289526
Source
Genetika. 2016 Sep; 52(9):1012-20
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
M V Afanas’ev
S V Balakhonov
E G Tokmakova
V S Polovinkina
E A Sidorova
V V Sinkov
Source
Genetika. 2016 Sep; 52(9):1012-20
Date
Sep-2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Plague - genetics
Plasmids - genetics
Siberia
Yersinia pestis - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
This paper studies a full nucleotide sequence of cryptic plasmid pTP33, which was isolated from the typical plague strain of the Tuvinian natural focus, Yersinia pestis I-2638. Sequencing was carried out using the 454 GS Junior platform (Roche). In analysis using the software package GS De Novo Assembler v. 2.7 (Roche) and the algorithm Newbler v. 2.7, 1855 nucleotide reads, which contained 1101246 nucleotides, were assembled to a contig of 33 978 bp. The GC content of the obtained nucleotide sequence was 50.25%. During annotation, we found 56 open reading frames. Homologs of the predicted reading frames were sought in the BLAST databases. We detected 22 reading frames coding hypothetical proteins, 23 frames coding phagerelated proteins, and 11 frames coding proteins with known functions, including toxin–antitoxin system YefM-YoeB, nucleic acids and polysaccharides metabolism proteins (exopolysaccharide production protein ExoZ, exodeoxyribonuclease VIII), and replication proteins (ParA). Some predicted pTP33 proteins were found to be homologs (from 45 to 75%) with sequences of phage-related proteins of certain microorganisms—endosymbionts of insects (Sodalis glossinidius) and endosymbionts of entomopathogenic nematodes (Photorhabdus luminescens, P. asymbiotica, Xenorhabdus bovienii).
PubMed ID
29369556 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of complete sequence of cryptic plasmid pTP33 from Yersinia pestis isolated in Tuva natural focus of plague].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289684
Source
Genetika. 2016 Sep; 52(9):1012-20
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
M V Afanas’ev
S V Balakhonov
E G Tokmakova
V S Polovinkina
E A Sidorova
V V Sinkov
Source
Genetika. 2016 Sep; 52(9):1012-20
Date
Sep-2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Plague - genetics
Plasmids - genetics
Siberia
Yersinia pestis - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
This paper studies a full nucleotide sequence of cryptic plasmid pTP33, which was isolated from the typical plague strain of the Tuvinian natural focus, Yersinia pestis I-2638. Sequencing was carried out using the 454 GS Junior platform (Roche). In analysis using the software package GS De Novo Assembler v. 2.7 (Roche) and the algorithm Newbler v. 2.7, 1855 nucleotide reads, which contained 1101246 nucleotides, were assembled to a contig of 33 978 bp. The GC content of the obtained nucleotide sequence was 50.25%. During annotation, we found 56 open reading frames. Homologs of the predicted reading frames were sought in the BLAST databases. We detected 22 reading frames coding hypothetical proteins, 23 frames coding phagerelated proteins, and 11 frames coding proteins with known functions, including toxin–antitoxin system YefM-YoeB, nucleic acids and polysaccharides metabolism proteins (exopolysaccharide production protein ExoZ, exodeoxyribonuclease VIII), and replication proteins (ParA). Some predicted pTP33 proteins were found to be homologs (from 45 to 75%) with sequences of phage-related proteins of certain microorganisms—endosymbionts of insects (Sodalis glossinidius) and endosymbionts of entomopathogenic nematodes (Photorhabdus luminescens, P. asymbiotica, Xenorhabdus bovienii).
PubMed ID
29369556 View in PubMed
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Analysis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Ontario, Canada, with decreased susceptibility to quinolones by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, auxotyping, serotyping and plasmid content.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208613
Source
J Med Microbiol. 1997 May;46(5):383-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
N. Harnett
S. Brown
G. Riley
R. Terro
C. Krishnan
M. Pauzé
K H Yeung
Author Affiliation
Central Public Health Laboratory, Ontario Ministry of Health, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Med Microbiol. 1997 May;46(5):383-90
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Quinolones
Anti-Infective Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Typing Techniques
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Incidence
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - classification - drug effects
Ontario - epidemiology
Plasmids
Restriction Mapping
Serotyping
Abstract
The incidence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with reduced susceptibility to quinolones increased from 0.18% (63 of 3285) in 1992 to 0.56% (15 of 2663) in 1993 and 0.62% (46 of 2846) in 1994. In all, 65 of the 67 isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with decreased susceptibility to quinolones were characterised by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), auxotyping, serotyping and plasmid content. The strains were distributed among 14 auxotype/serovar (A/S) classes. Thirty isolates (46.2%) which were penicillin-susceptible with ciprofloxacin MIC90 of 0.12 mg/L and norfloxacin MIC90 of 1.0 mg/L belonged to a single A/S class, OUHL/IA-2. All but two of the 30 isolates had identical PFGE restriction profiles with NheI restriction endonuclease. Fifteen isolates (23.1%) with MICs in the intermediate (or resistant) categories for penicillin and with ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin MIC90 of 0.25 and 4.0 mg/L and (0.5 and 4.0 mg/L) respectively, belonged to A/S class P/IB-1. The 15 isolates showed nine different patterns with NheI and eight patterns with SpeI restriction endonucleases. Two of three beta-lactamase-producing (PPNG) isolates belonged to A/S class P/IB-5 and had a dissimilar PFGE restriction profile with NheI endonuclease; the other isolate belonged to A/S class P/IB-8. The remaining 17 isolates were distributed among 11 A/S classes. Three isolates within the common A/S class NR/IB-1 were subdivided into two types by PFGE as were three isolates belonging to A/S class NR/IB-2. Overall the 65 isolates of N. gonorrhoeae were distributed into 30 NheI and 26 SpeI macrorestriction profiles. All but one isolate harboured the 2.6-MDa cryptic plasmid and 18 isolates carried the 24.5-MDa transferable plasmid. The three PPNG isolates carried the 4.5-MDa Asian beta-lactamase-producing plasmid and a 25.2-MDa conjugative plasmid was found in the two TRNG isolates.
PubMed ID
9152033 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of plasmid profile of antibiotic-resistant Enterobacteriaceae circulating in hospitals].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229366
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 1990 Apr;35(4):28-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
A M Dombrovskii
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 1990 Apr;35(4):28-32
Date
Apr-1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Child
Cross Infection - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Escherichia coli - drug effects - genetics
Escherichia coli Infections - microbiology
Genotype
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Moscow
Plasmids - drug effects
R Factors - drug effects - genetics
Salmonella Infections - microbiology
Salmonella typhimurium - drug effects - genetics
Abstract
Certain pheno- and genotype properties of S. typhimurium and some other representatives of Enterobacteriaceae resistant to antimicrobial drugs were studied. The strains were isolated from children with salmonellosis within 4 months when an infection hospital was subjected to microbiological observation. It was shown that by their antibiotic resistance, phagovars and molecular weights of the plasmid DNas, the strains S. typhimurium were similar to those isolated during hospital infections. The conjugative plasmids responsible for antibiotic resistance in some strains did not differ in their molecular weights and antibiotic resistance markers. The strains S. typhimurium similar in their pheno- and genotype properties were isolated only from 2 patients which allowed one to consider it possible that the patients were infected by the strains of common genesis. Analysis of nonpathogenic representatives of Enterobacteriaceae isolated from the patients along with the S. typhimurium strains confirmed the fact that the patients were infected with the same pathogenic strain.
PubMed ID
2200370 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of the Nucleotide Sequence of a Cryptic Plasmid from Yersinia pestis Strains in the Central Caucasian High-Mountain Plague Focus].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268183
Source
Genetika. 2015 Jul;51(7):754-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
E G Oglodin
A V Cherkasov
G A Eroshenko
G N Odinokov
N Yu Shavina
L A Novichkova
V V Kutyrev
Source
Genetika. 2015 Jul;51(7):754-8
Date
Jul-2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Base Composition
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Open Reading Frames
Phylogeny
Plague - microbiology
Plasmids - genetics
Russia
Yersinia pestis - genetics - pathogenicity
Abstract
An analysis of a 5.4-kbp cryptic plasmid detected in the course of whole-genome sequencing of the Yersinia pestis medieval biovar isolated in the Russian Central Caucasian high-mountain plague focus was performed. The identification of the nucleotide sequence of this cryptic plasmid and its structural and functional analysis revealed that it contained eight open reading frames, among which the following genes were identified: the rep gene of a replication protein, the virB6 gene of a type-IV secretion system inner membrane protein, the virB5gene of the type-IV secretion system minor pilin, and a number of genes probably associated with secretion and transport. A general analysis of the pCKF plasmid DNA showed that the adenine content was 28.34%, the cytosine content was 20.5%, the guanine content was 17.87%, and that of thymine was 33.28%, while the total G+C content appeared to be 38.38%. The G+C content of the chromosome of the Y pestis strain C-627 is 47.6%, which indicates that the pCKF plasmid was obtained from a microorganism equally-phylogenetically distant from the Yersinia bacteria andany other bacteria from the Enterobacteriaceae family. A comparison of the amino acid sequences.of hypothetical proteins encoded by pCKF plasmid with analogous proteins encoded by other bacteria was carried out. The possible contribution of the pCKF plasmid to the maintenance of the most ancient known phylogenetic line of Y. pestis medieval biovar, 2.MEDO, was discussed.
PubMed ID
26410928 View in PubMed
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An OXA-48-producing Escherichia coli isolated from a Danish patient with no hospitalization abroad.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272600
Source
Infect Dis (Lond). 2015 Aug;47(8):593-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Anne Gedebjerg
Henrik Hasman
Christian Møller Sørensen
Mikala Wang
Source
Infect Dis (Lond). 2015 Aug;47(8):593-5
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Drug Resistance, Bacterial - genetics
Egypt
Escherichia coli - enzymology - genetics - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - microbiology
Escherichia coli Proteins - biosynthesis
Female
Genome, Bacterial
Hospitalization
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Plasmids
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Travel
Turkey
beta-Lactamases - biosynthesis
Abstract
Carbapenemase-producing organisms are disseminating globally and are now emerging as a worrying threat in Scandinavia. Before August 2013, OXA-48-producing organisms had not been detected in Danish patients. Here we report the isolation of an ST746 OXA-48-producing Escherichia coli with the plasmid pOXA-48a carrying the blaOXA-48 gene isolated from a Danish patient without history of hospitalization abroad. The patient reported tourist travel to Egypt and Turkey. The potential acquisition of carbapenemase-producing organisms by ingestion of contaminated food is discussed.
PubMed ID
25751777 View in PubMed
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191 records – page 1 of 20.