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The Antisecretory Factor in Plasma and Breast Milk in Breastfeeding Mothers-A Prospective Cohort Study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297710
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Sep 04; 10(9):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-04-2018
Author
Anna Gustafsson
Elisabeth Granström
Christina Stecksén-Blicks
Christina E West
Sven-Arne Silfverdal
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, SE 141 86 Stockholm, Sweden. anna.gustafsson.1@ki.se.
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Sep 04; 10(9):
Date
Sep-04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Breast Diseases - blood - complications
Breast Feeding
Calcium - analysis - blood
Candidiasis - blood - complications
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lactoferrin - analysis - blood
Male
Mastitis - blood - complications
Milk, human - chemistry
Mothers
Neuropeptides - analysis - blood
Plasma - chemistry
Postpartum Period - blood
Prospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Inflammation and infection postpartum threaten the mother and her infant. Human milk provides a defense for the infant, but inflammatory complications like mastitis may lead to the cessation of breastfeeding. Antisecretory factor (AF) has a role in the regulation of secretory processes and inflammation. The objective of the study was to describe AF-levels in plasma and breast milk, and in relation to breast complications. Breastfeeding mothers (n = 95) were consecutively recruited at a Well Baby Clinic in Umeå, Sweden. At inclusion four weeks postpartum, samples of venous blood (10 mL) and breast milk (10 mL) were collected. Active AF was analyzed with ELISA using a monoclonal antibody mAb43, and was detected in all samples of plasma and breast milk with a positive correlation (Spearman coefficient = 0.40, p
PubMed ID
30181494 View in PubMed
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[Changes in the level of gamma-aminobutyric acid in the blood of children with thyroid diseases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22324
Source
Fiziol Zh. 1997;43(1-2):64-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
T M Myshunina
O V Bol'shova
O Ia Samson
V Ia Kononenko
Source
Fiziol Zh. 1997;43(1-2):64-9
Date
1997
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Humans
Plasma - chemistry
Statistics, nonparametric
Thyroid Diseases - blood - surgery
Time Factors
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid - blood
Abstract
Blood GABA level was studied in children with thyroid disorders. Increase of GABA level was revealed in thyroid hyperplasia (11 degrees) and euthyroid goiters; in blood of children with diffuse toxic goiter there changes are much more significant. In children with thyroid cancer dramatic increase of GABA content was observed; in the nearest time following thyroidectomy blood GABA level decreased to low values, several mouths later it became normal, in a year and more it became elevated again. In blood from three children with congenital hypothyrosis the level of the mediator was decreased; no changes in GABA level were observed in children with autoimmune thyroiditis. Two hours after falling asleep blood GABA content lowered both in normal children and those with euthyroid goiter and thyroid cancer. The mediator level elevated sharply after finishing physical exercises in normal children and those with euthyroid goiter, while in children with thyroid cancer response of GABAergic system to physical exercises was opposite and in operated children it was absent.
PubMed ID
9221121 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of a standardized protocol for thrombin generation using the calibrated automated thrombogram: A Nordic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299706
Source
Haemophilia. 2019 Mar; 25(2):334-342
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Marcus Ljungkvist
Karin Strandberg
Erik Berntorp
Roza Chaireti
Pål André Holme
Ole Halfdan Larsen
Riitta Lassila
Annukka Jouppila
Timea Szanto
Eva Zetterberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Translational Medicine & Centre for Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Haemophilia. 2019 Mar; 25(2):334-342
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Keywords
Automation
Blood Coagulation
Blood Coagulation Tests - methods - standards
Calibration
Humans
Laboratories - standards
Norway
Plasma - chemistry
Reference Standards
Reproducibility of Results
Thrombin - metabolism
Abstract
The thrombin generation assay-calibrated automated thrombogram (TGA-CAT) method is used to measure the overall coagulation capacity in plasma. However, the method is still considered to be a research tool, mainly because of its' lack of standardization.
Our study aimed to further raise the standardization level for the TGA-CAT method by evaluating a detailed standardization protocol and three reference plasmas' (RP)s ability to normalize results.
Six Nordic centres participated in the study, and with input from all centres a detailed laboratory standardization protocol based on the TGA-CAT manual of the manufacturer was established. Three types of plasma, hypo-,normal and hypercoagulable plasma were assessed. Three commercial lyophilized RPs were used for normalization of data. All samples were aliquoted at the Malmö centre and sent frozen at -20°C to participating centres.
Before normalization, all results under all testing conditions showed inter-laboratory coefficient of variability of 10% or lower except for endogenous thrombin potential (12%) and peak (14%) in hypo-plasma with 1 pmol/L tissue factor as starting agent. Successful normalization, improving variability in results, was obtained with two of the three evaluated RPs (HemosIL RP and Affinity RP).
With our standardization concept, we were able to produce TGA-CAT results as robust as standard coagulation assays used in the routine laboratories. Normalization with HemosIL RP may be considered in populations with low or unknown coagulability, while when analysing plasma samples from populations where hypercoagulability is known or suspected, normalization with Affinity RP may be preferred.
PubMed ID
30715788 View in PubMed
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Genetic and transcriptional analysis of inflammatory bowel disease-associated pathways in patients with GUCY2C-linked familial diarrhea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299472
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2018 Oct - Nov; 53(10-11):1264-1273
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Rune R Tronstad
Tatiana Polushina
Hans-Richard Brattbakk
Christine Stansberg
Hilde Løland von Volkmann
Kurt Hanevik
Eva Ellinghaus
Silje Fjellgård Jørgensen
Kari Merete Ersland
Khanh D-C Pham
Odd Helge Gilja
Nils Hovdenak
Trygve Hausken
Morten H Vatn
Andre Franke
Per Morten Knappskog
Stephanie Le Hellard
Tom Hemming Karlsen
Torunn Fiskerstrand
Author Affiliation
a Department of Clinical Science , University of Bergen , Bergen , Norway.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2018 Oct - Nov; 53(10-11):1264-1273
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Diarrhea - genetics - metabolism
Down-Regulation
Family Health
Female
Gene Expression
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Ileum - pathology
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Nod2 Signaling Adaptor Protein - genetics
Norway
Plasma - chemistry
Receptors, Enterotoxin - genetics
Risk assessment
Syndrome
Young Adult
Abstract
Activating mutations in the GUCY2C gene, which encodes the epithelial receptor guanylate cyclase C, cause diarrhea due to increased loss of sodium chloride to the intestinal lumen. Patients with familial GUCY2C diarrhea syndrome (FGDS) are predisposed to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We investigated whether genes in the guanylate cyclase C pathway are enriched for association with IBD and reversely whether genetic or transcriptional changes associated with IBD are found in FGDS patients.
(1) A set of 27 genes from the guanylate cyclase C pathway was tested for enrichment of association with IBD by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, using genome-wide association summary statistics from 12,882 IBD patients and 21,770 controls. (2) We genotyped 163 known IBD risk loci and sequenced NOD2 in 22 patients with FGDS. Eight of them had concomitant Crohn's disease. (3) Global gene expression analysis was performed in ileal tissue from patients with FGDS, Crohn's disease and healthy individuals.
The guanylate cyclase C gene set showed a significant enrichment of association in IBD genome-wide association data. Risk variants in NOD2 were found in 7/8 FGDS patients with concomitant Crohn's disease and in 2/14 FDGS patients without Crohn's disease. In ileal tissue, downregulation of metallothioneins characterized FGDS patients compared to healthy controls.
Our results support a role of guanylate cyclase C signaling and disturbed electrolyte homeostasis in development of IBD. Furthermore, downregulation of metallothioneins in the ileal mucosa of FGDS patients may contribute to IBD development, possibly alongside effects from NOD2 risk variants.
PubMed ID
30353760 View in PubMed
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Long-term hypo-osmoregulatory capacity in downstream migrating Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. smolts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258125
Source
J Fish Biol. 2014 Oct;85(4):1131-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
H A Urke
J V Arnekleiv
T O Nilsen
K J Nilssen
L. Rønning
J B Ulvund
T. Kristensen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Water Research, N-7462 Trondheim, Norway.
Source
J Fish Biol. 2014 Oct;85(4):1131-44
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Migration
Animals
Chlorides - blood
Hydrocortisone - blood
Magnesium - blood
Norway
Osmoregulation
Plasma - chemistry
Rivers
Salinity
Salmo salar - physiology
Seawater
Abstract
The duration of hypo-osmoregulatory capacity in downstream migrating Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L smolts previously stocked as startfed young-of-the year (YOY) parr was tested in the River Dalåa from mid-May to late-June 1999. Hypo-osmoregulatory capacity, measured as plasma osmolality and chloride, was assessed after seawater (SW) challenge tests (168 h, salinity = 35). All S. salar exhibited sufficient hypo-osmoregulatory capacity at the initiation of downstream migration in mid-May. Migrating S. salar smolts caught in mid-May and retained in fresh water displayed no signs of de-smoltification as they maintained hypo-osmoregulatory capacity through June. This indicates a physiological smolt window that lasts a minimum of 6 weeks (330 degree days; D°) for hatchery-produced S. salar smolts stocked as YOY parr. Based on the observed river migration speeds, it can be assumed that the S. salar smolts entered SW 2-4 weeks after initiation of migration in the upper parts of the River Dalåa. Hence, based on smolt migration and SW tolerance, it is suggested that stocking of YOY parr is a viable enhancement strategy in the River Dalåa.
PubMed ID
25199923 View in PubMed
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Measurement of glucose content in plasma from capillary blood in diagnosis of diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47329
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2003;63(6):431-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
M. Stahl
I. Brandslund
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Vejle County Hospital, Vejle, Denmark. mas@vs.vejleamt.dk
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2003;63(6):431-40
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Chemical Analysis
Blood Glucose - analysis
Capillaries - chemistry
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis
Ear, External - blood supply
Humans
Plasma - chemistry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Thumb - blood supply
Abstract
Overall, there is good correlation between glucose values obtained from ear capillary blood and those from peripheral venous plasma, but there are considerable individual differences. Results obtained with these two methods are generally not interchangeable and the converted values should not be used in the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, because of the risk of misclassification. In Denmark this can affect 20-24000 persons. The aim of our study was to investigate whether these differences might be less significant if measurements were taken at the plasma phase of capillary blood and expressed directly as capillary plasma results and if finger capillary blood were used instead of ear capillary blood. The Hitachi 717 instrument was used for measurements of glucose concentrations in venous plasma, the Cobas Mira S in capillary whole blood and the Accu-Chek Inform from Roche in capillary plasma. The conclusions drawn were (1) capillary ear blood glucose concentration correlates well with capillary finger blood concentration and the two sites can be used interchangeably, yielding similar results in the individual patient; (2) sampling variation is almost the same (approx. 0.16 mmol/L) on capillary plasma and capillary whole blood from finger and ear. Sampling variation for venous plasma measured on the Hitachi instrument was 0.13 mmol/L; not significantly better; (3) the analytical imprecision of glucose measurements on capillary plasma (Accu-Chek Inform) and capillary whole blood (haemolysate method) is almost the same (approx. 2.0%). The analytical imprecision of glucose measurements on venous plasma is 0.9% using a laboratory method and almost twice as high using Accu-Chek Inform (2.1%); (4) determination of capillary plasma values in the finger did not improve the correlation with venous plasma values. Even though average values were in better concordance, individual differences did not change. For some persons, both ear- and finger capillary blood measurements deviate significantly from results on venous plasma, such that they cannot be used for diagnosis of diabetes mellitus; (5) the main factor for good correlation is the sampling site. Results obtained on plasma and whole blood from the same puncture correlate well; (6) neither capillary blood nor capillary plasma correlates with the venous plasma method recommended by the American Diabetes Association. It is concluded that physiologic differences in glucose content in capillary- and venous blood prohibit the random use of these two materials in the diagnosis of diabetes.
PubMed ID
14594324 View in PubMed
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New Nordic Diet versus Average Danish Diet: A Randomized Controlled Trial Revealed Healthy Long-Term Effects of the New Nordic Diet by GC-MS Blood Plasma Metabolomics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287403
Source
J Proteome Res. 2016 Jun 03;15(6):1939-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-03-2016
Author
Bekzod Khakimov
Sanne Kellebjerg Poulsen
Francesco Savorani
Evrim Acar
Gözde Gürdeniz
Thomas M Larsen
Arne Astrup
Lars O Dragsted
Søren Balling Engelsen
Source
J Proteome Res. 2016 Jun 03;15(6):1939-54
Date
Jun-03-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Denmark
Diet - methods - standards
Edible Grain
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Fruit
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Metabolome
Metabolomics - methods
Middle Aged
Obesity - diet therapy
Plasma - chemistry - metabolism
Seafood
Seasons
Sex Factors
Vegetables
Weight Loss
Young Adult
Abstract
A previous study has shown effects of the New Nordic Diet (NND) to stimulate weight loss and lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure in obese Danish women and men in a randomized, controlled dietary intervention study. This work demonstrates long-term metabolic effects of the NND as compared with an Average Danish Diet (ADD) in blood plasma and reveals associations between metabolic changes and health beneficial effects of the NND including weight loss. A total of 145 individuals completed the intervention and blood samples were taken along with clinical examinations before the intervention started (week 0) and after 12 and 26 weeks. The plasma metabolome was measured using GC-MS, and the final metabolite table contained 144 variables. Significant and novel metabolic effects of the diet, resulting weight loss, gender, and intervention study season were revealed using PLS-DA and ASCA. Several metabolites reflecting specific differences in the diets, especially intake of plant foods and seafood, and in energy metabolism related to ketone bodies and gluconeogenesis formed the predominant metabolite pattern discriminating the intervention groups. Among NND subjects, higher levels of vaccenic acid and 3-hydroxybutanoic acid were related to a higher weight loss, while higher concentrations of salicylic, lactic, and N-aspartic acids and 1,5-anhydro-d-sorbitol were related to a lower weight loss. Specific gender and seasonal differences were also observed. The study strongly indicates that healthy diets high in fish, vegetables, fruit, and whole grain facilitated weight loss and improved insulin sensitivity by increasing ketosis and gluconeogenesis in the fasting state.
PubMed ID
27146725 View in PubMed
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Proton nuclear magnetic resonance lineshape studies on human blood plasma lipids from newborn infants, healthy adults, and adults with tumors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24410
Source
Magn Reson Med. 1992 Jul;26(1):89-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1992
Author
Y. Hiltunen
M. Ala-Korpela
J. Jokisaari
S. Eskelinen
K. Kiviniitty
Author Affiliation
Department of Physics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Magn Reson Med. 1992 Jul;26(1):89-99
Date
Jul-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - blood
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Lipoproteins - blood
Lung Neoplasms - blood
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - diagnostic use
Middle Aged
Plasma - chemistry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The usefulness of proton NMR spectroscopy of human blood plasma for cancer research has been extensively studied in recent years. Two main starting points have been offered by Fossel et al. (N. Engl. J. Med. 315, 1369 (1986)) and Mountford et al. (FEBS Lett. 203, 164 (1986)). In this work the experimental proton NMR spectra of blood plasma were analyzed with the aid of the multivariate lineshape fitting method. An appropriate model structure, in terms of the various lipoprotein (VLDL, LDL, and HDL) signals, for the methylene region was used. Neonates, healthy adults, and adults with nonmalignant and malignant tumors were studied. The linewidth of the methylene region was found to be linearly dependent on the relative concentrations of the lipoproteins. The correlation coefficient was -0.89 (P less than 0.001) for VLDL and 0.88 (P less than 0.001) for HDL. A correlation between VLDL concentration and age, 0.76 (P less than 0.001), was also established. VLDL was modeled using two components. The half-linewidth of the lower field component was slightly elevated for the adults with large metastases. This might be in association with the fucose-containing proteolipid complex detected earlier in cancer cells or in sera of cancer patients. Some signals of this complex may fall in the same region of the spectra. The spectra for the neonates were indicated to be totally different from the adults. This and other related questions were explained by means of the model parameters and the relative concentrations of the lipoproteins VLDL, LDL, and HDL. The presented technique can be used as a rapid research tool for figuring out the relative concentrations of the lipoproteins in blood plasma and explaining the reasons behind the changes in the spectra.
PubMed ID
1625571 View in PubMed
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Reproducibility and accuracy of measurements of free and total prostate-specific antigen in serum vs plasma after long-term storage at -20 degrees C.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16557
Source
Clin Chem. 2006 Feb;52(2):235-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
David Ulmert
Charlotte Becker
Jan-Ake Nilsson
Timo Piironen
Thomas Björk
Jonas Hugosson
Göran Berglund
Hans Lilja
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry, Lund University, University Hospital (UMAS), Malmö, Sweden. David.Ulmert@med.lu.se
Source
Clin Chem. 2006 Feb;52(2):235-9
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Cryopreservation
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Plasma - chemistry
Prostate-Specific Antigen - blood
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Serum - chemistry
Specimen Handling
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Long-term frozen storage may alter the results of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurements, mainly because of degradation of free PSA (fPSA) in vitro. We compared the effects of long-term storage on fPSA, total PSA (tPSA), and complexed PSA (cPSA) in serum vs EDTA-plasma samples. METHODS: We measured fPSA and tPSA concentrations in matched pairs of archival serum and EDTA-plasma samples (stored frozen at -20 degrees C for 20 years) from a large population-based cohort in Malmö, Sweden. We also compared concentrations in age-matched men with those in samples not subjected to long-term storage, obtained from participants in a population-based study of prostate cancer screening in Göteborg, Sweden. These contemporary samples were handled according to standardized preanalytical and analytical protocols aimed at minimizing in vitro degradation. tPSA and fPSA measurements were performed with a commercial assay (Prostatus Dual Assay; Perkin-Elmer Life Sciences). RESULTS: Concentrations of tPSA and fPSA and calculated cPSA (tPSA - fPSA) in archival plasma were not significantly different from those in contemporary serum from age-matched men. In archival serum, however, random variability of fPSA was higher vs plasma than in contemporary samples, whereas systematic error of fPSA analyses was similarly small in archival and contemporary serum and plasma. CONCLUSIONS: Concentrations of tPSA and calculated cPSA were highly stable in plasma and serum samples subjected to long-term storage at -20 degrees C. Greater random variability, rather than a systematic decrease, may explain differences in fPSA analyses observed in archival serum.
PubMed ID
16384894 View in PubMed
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Sea ice-associated decline in body condition leads to increased concentrations of lipophilic pollutants in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from Svalbard, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292278
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Jan 15; 576:409-419
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-15-2017
Author
Sabrina Tartu
Sophie Bourgeon
Jon Aars
Magnus Andersen
Anuschka Polder
Gregory W Thiemann
Jeffrey M Welker
Heli Routti
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Polar Institute, Fram Centre, Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: tartu.sabrina@gmail.com.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Jan 15; 576:409-419
Date
Jan-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Animals
Arctic Regions
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Female
Global warming
Ice Cover
Plasma - chemistry
Svalbard
Ursidae
Abstract
Global climate changes are magnified in the Arctic and are having an especially dramatic effect on the spatial and temporal distribution and the thickness traits of sea ice. Decline of Arctic sea ice may lead to qualitative and/or quantitative changes in diet and reduced body condition (i.e. adipose tissue stores) of ice-associated apex predators such as polar bears (Ursus maritimus). This may further affect their tissue concentrations of lipophilic pollutants. We determined how variations in adipose tissue stores associated to both breeding status and spatial changes in sea ice conditions and diet influence concentrations and biotransformation of lipophilic persistent organic pollutants (POPs). We collected 112 blood and fat samples from female polar bears (Ursus maritimus) of different breeding status (alone, with cubs of the year, or with yearlings) during two seasons (April and September) in 2012 and 2013 at three locations of Svalbard, Norway, with contrasted sea ice conditions. We inferred diet from nitrogen and carbon stable isotope ratios in red blood cells and fatty acid composition in adipose tissue. Relative to diet, body condition, which was negatively related to sea ice extent at both temporal and spatial scales, was the most important predictor for concentrations of POPs in plasma and fat, whereas diet showed a minor influence. Additionally, fatter females were more efficient at biotransforming PCBs than were leaner ones. Breeding status influenced the concentrations of less lipophilic compounds such as ß-hexachlorocyclohexane, which were lower in females with yearlings, probably due to excretion into milk and subsequent offloading to young. In conclusion, our results indicate that declining sea ice indirectly leads to increased concentrations of lipophilic pollutants in polar bears mediated through reduced feeding opportunities and declining body condition rather than changes in diet composition.
Notes
ErratumIn: Sci Total Environ. 2017 Oct 1;595:818 PMID 28411564
PubMed ID
27794227 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.