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Activation of PPARgamma by metabolites from the flowers of purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99024
Source
J Nat Prod. 2009 May 22;72(5):933-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-22-2009
Author
Kathrine B Christensen
Rasmus K Petersen
Sidsel Petersen
Karsten Kristiansen
Lars P Christensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, University of Aarhus, Kirstinebjergvej 10, 5792 Aarslev, Denmark. kbch@kbm.sdu.dk
Source
J Nat Prod. 2009 May 22;72(5):933-7
Date
May-22-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3T3-L1 Cells
Animals
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Echinacea - chemistry
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Flowers - chemistry
Glucose - metabolism
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Mice
PPAR gamma - drug effects - metabolism
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Abstract
Thiazolidinediones are insulin sensitizing drugs that target the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma. An n-hexane extract of the flowers of Echinacea purpurea was found to activate PPARgamma without stimulating adipocyte differentiation. Bioassay-guided fractionations yielded five alkamides, of which one was new, and three fatty acids that all activated PPARgamma. The new alkamide hexadeca-2E,9Z,12Z,14E-tetraenoic acid isobutylamide (5) was identified by analysis of spectroscopic data and found to activate PPARgamma with no concurrent stimulation of adipocyte differentiation. Compound 5 was further shown to increase insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. The data suggest that flowers of E. purpurea contain compounds with potential to manage insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.
PubMed ID
19374389 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Activity of cytoplasmic proteinases from rat liver in Heren's carcinoma during tumor growth and treatment with medicinal herbs]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20009
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2000 May-Jun;72(3):91-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
M M Marchenko
H P Kopyl'chuk
O V Hrygor'ieva
Author Affiliation
Yu. Fedkovich Chernivtsi State University, Ukraine.
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2000 May-Jun;72(3):91-4
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cytoplasm - enzymology
English Abstract
Hydrolysis
Liver - enzymology - pathology
Liver Neoplasms - enzymology
Organ Size - drug effects
Plant Extracts - pharmacology
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Rats
Abstract
The dynamics of the acid and neutral proteinases general enzymes activity change in the hepatocytes postnuclear fraction in the rats suffering from the Heren's carcinoma was investigated. It was determined that in the tumor development of the enzyme activity level of both the acid and neutral proteinases increased 2,6-fold. The natural preparation of the herbs (Calendula officinalis L., Echinacea purpurea L., Scorzonera humilis L., Aconitum moldavicum Hacq.) normalizes both the activity of the investigated enzymes and coefficients of the liver weights of the sick animals. The chemical medicinal preparation 5,6-benzcumarine-5-uracil normalizes the activity of the neutral cytoplasmatic proteinases and reduces the level of the proteolytic activity of the acid enzymes in comparison with the control group of the animals as well as increases of the liver weight coefficients.
PubMed ID
11200483 View in PubMed
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Anti-apoptotic potential of several antidiabetic medicinal plants of the eastern James Bay Cree pharmacopeia in cultured kidney cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290206
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2018 Jan 30; 18(1):37
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-30-2018
Author
Shilin Li
Sarah Pasquin
Hoda M Eid
Jean-François Gauchat
Ammar Saleem
Pierre S Haddad
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, Université de Montréal, P.O. Box 6128, Downtown Postal Station, Montreal, (Quebec), H3C 3J7, Canada.
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2018 Jan 30; 18(1):37
Date
Jan-30-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Annexin A5 - chemistry
Apoptosis - drug effects
Canada
Caspases - metabolism
Diabetic Nephropathies - metabolism
Dogs
Hypoglycemic Agents - chemistry - pharmacology
Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells
Medicine, Traditional
Plant Extracts - chemistry - pharmacology
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Propidium - chemistry
Protective Agents - chemistry - pharmacology
Abstract
Our team has identified 17 Boreal forest species from the traditional pharmacopeia of the Eastern James Bay Cree that presented promising in vitro and in vivo biological activities in the context of type 2 diabetes (T2D). We now screened the 17 plants extracts for potential anti-apoptotic activity in cultured kidney cells and investigated the underlying mechanisms.
MDCK (Madin-Darnby Canine Kidney) cell damage was induced by hypertonic medium (700 mOsm/L) in the presence or absence of maximal nontoxic concentrations of each of the 17 plant extracts. After 18 h' treatment, cells were stained with Annexin V (AnnV) and Propidium iodide (PI) and subjected to flow cytometry to assess the cytoprotective (AnnV-/PI-) and anti-apoptotic (AnnV+/PI-) potential of the 17 plant extracts. We then selected a representative subset of species (most cytoprotective, moderately so or neutral) to measure the activity of caspases 3, 8 and 9.
Gaultheria hispidula and Abies balsamea are amongst the most powerful cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic plants and appear to exert their modulatory effect primarily by inhibiting caspase 9 in the mitochondrial apoptotic signaling pathway.
We conclude that several Cree antidiabetic plants exert anti-apoptotic activity that may be relevant in the context of diabetic nephropathy (DN) that affects a significant proportion of Cree diabetics.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29378549 View in PubMed
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[Anti-arrhythmic effect of phytoadaptogens]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10353
Source
Eksp Klin Farmakol. 2000 Jul-Aug;63(4):29-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
L A Maimeskulova
L N Maslov
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Experimental Cardiology, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Tomsk, Russia.
Source
Eksp Klin Farmakol. 2000 Jul-Aug;63(4):29-31
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic Agonists
Animals
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - pharmacology
Arrhythmia - chemically induced - prevention & control
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Epinephrine
Injections, Intraventricular
Male
Naloxone - pharmacology
Narcotic Antagonists - pharmacology
Plant Extracts - pharmacology
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Receptors, Opioid - drug effects
Abstract
Repeated prophylactic administration of plant adaptogen preparations based on extracts from rhodiola, eleutherococcus, leuzea, and ginseng, produced a pronounced antiarrhythmic effect on the model of adrenal arrhythmia in animals. Preliminary opioid receptor block by naloxone reduced the protective effect of phytopreparations in the adapted animals. Intravenous and intracerebroventricular administration of naloxone (opioid receptor antagonist) showed that the anti-arrhythmic effect of rhodiola extract proceeds through the activation of both central and peripheral opioid receptors.
PubMed ID
11022302 View in PubMed
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Antibacterial activity of some indigenous plants used for the treatment of wounds in the Eastern Cape, South Africa.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201258
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1999 Jul;66(1):103-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
D S Grierson
A J Afolayan
Author Affiliation
Botany Department, University of Fort Hare, Alice, South Africa.
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1999 Jul;66(1):103-6
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Bacteria - drug effects
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Humans
Medicine, African Traditional
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Plant Extracts - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Wound Healing - drug effects
Abstract
The use of medicinal plants in the world, and especially in South Africa, contributes significantly to primary health care. This paper presents the findings of an initial survey of plants used for the treatment of wounds in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Ethnomedical information gathered from surveys at clinics, hospitals as well as interviews with traditional healers and rural dwellers has revealed that Grewia occidentalis, Polystichum pungens, Cheilanthes viridis and Malva parvifolia are the most commonly used plants for the treatment of wounds in the province. The methanol extracts of G. occidentalis, P. pungens and C. viridis showed significant inhibition against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, while the acetone extract of P. pungens inhibited the gram-positive bacteria only. Extracts from M. parvifolia did not show any antibacterial activity at 5.0 mg/ml. Generally, the antibacterial property of the plants appears to have justified their use for the treatment of wounds, which are contaminated through bacterial infection, in the province.
PubMed ID
10432215 View in PubMed
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Antineoplastic agents. 488. Isolation and structure of yukonin from a yukon territory fungus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18581
Source
J Nat Prod. 2003 Feb;66(2):276-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
George R Pettit
Rui Tan
Delbert L Herald
John Hamblin
Robin K Pettit
Author Affiliation
Cancer Research Institute, Department of Chemistry,Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA. bpetit@asu.edu
Source
J Nat Prod. 2003 Feb;66(2):276-8
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Agents - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Candida albicans - drug effects
Cryptococcus neoformans - drug effects
Crystallography, X-Ray
Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor
Humans
Lactones - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Molecular Conformation
Molecular Structure
Phialophora - chemistry
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Terpenes - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Tumor Cells, Cultured - drug effects
Yukon Territory
Abstract
Cancer cell line bioassay-guided separation of an extract from a Yukon Territory fungus resulted in the isolation of a new C(16)-terpene dilactone designated yukonin (1) accompanied by two previously known, structurally related constituents (2 and 3). The structure of each was determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis. Dilactone 2 was found to correspond to LL-Z1271alpha isolated from fungi in the genera Oidiodendron, Acrostalagmus, and Holwaya, while dilactone 3 had earlier been prepared by reduction of an alpha-lactol derivative. Each of the dilactones was found to inhibit growth of human cancer cell lines (pancreas, breast, CNS, lung, colon, and prostate) and some pathogenic fungi.
PubMed ID
12608865 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antineoplastic agents. 529. Isolation and structure of nootkastatins 1 and 2 from the Alaskan yellow cedar Chamaecyparis nootkatensis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3891
Source
J Nat Prod. 2004 Sep;67(9):1476-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
George R Pettit
Rui Tan
Julian S Northen
Delbert L Herald
Jean-Charles Chapuis
Robin K Pettit
Author Affiliation
Cancer Research Institute and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-2404, USA. bpettit@asu.edu
Source
J Nat Prod. 2004 Sep;67(9):1476-82
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Chamaecyparis - chemistry
Diterpenes - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor
Fungi - drug effects
Gram-Positive Bacteria - drug effects
Humans
Leukemia P388
Mice
Molecular Structure
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Trees - chemistry
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Abstract
The yellow cedar tree, Chamaecyparis nootkatensis, collected in southeast Alaska was evaluated as a potential source of new anticancer agents. Two new diterpene anticancer constituents termed nootkastatins 1 (4) and 2 (5) were isolated along with three previously known diterpene cancer cell growth inhibitors where two were reported as synthetic modifications of totarol and not previously found in nature. All five diterpene structures were established by HRMS and 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analyses combined with three X-ray crystal structure determinations (2, 3, and 5). Against a panel of six human cancer cell lines, this series of diterpenes exhibited inhibition over the range GI(50) 0.75-2.0 microg/mL, and all inhibited the growth of Gram-positive bacteria and fungi.
PubMed ID
15387645 View in PubMed
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Antioxidant activity relates to plant part, life form and growing condition in some diabetes remedies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163311
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 2007 Jul 25;112(3):461-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-25-2007
Author
Letitia M McCune
Timothy Johns
Author Affiliation
Department of Plant Science, Macdonald Campus, McGill University, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec, Canada. letitiamccune@msn.com
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 2007 Jul 25;112(3):461-9
Date
Jul-25-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antioxidants - isolation & purification - therapeutic use
Biphenyl Compounds
Canada
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy
Ecosystem
Flowers - chemistry
Free Radical Scavengers - isolation & purification - therapeutic use
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - isolation & purification - therapeutic use
Picrates - isolation & purification - therapeutic use
Plant Bark - chemistry
Plant Extracts - isolation & purification - therapeutic use
Plant Leaves - chemistry
Plant Roots - chemistry
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry - classification - growth & development
Abstract
Selection, collection and preparation of 35 plant species used by traditional healers in the boreal regions of Canada for treatment of the symptoms of diabetes were supported empirically by antioxidant activity of the plants. Because antioxidants fluctuate with growth parameters and environmental factors, these remedies were evaluated in relation to the affect of plant part, life form and growing condition on the level of activity. The parts used here more frequently as medicines were roots and bark. Activity (IC(50)) of the bark extracts used medicinally averaged to 21.38+/-3.84 ppm while root extracts used medicinally had an IC(50) of 185.11+/-32.18 ppm in a free radical DPPH assay. In contrast the analysis of extracts of overall parts (medicinal or not) in these species found leaves and bark to have the least activity (112.22+/-30.63 ppm and 123.02+/-21.13 ppm, respectively). The highest activity was found in tree extracts (24.88+/-3.32 ppm) as compared to herbs and shrubs, and increased activity was found in plant extracts from growing conditions of decreased water/fertility. The antioxidant activity of these traditional plant remedies have the potential to be partially deduced through environment signals interpreted by the traditional herbalist.
PubMed ID
17532584 View in PubMed
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Bergenia crassifolia (L.) Fritsch--pharmacology and phytochemistry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261299
Source
Phytomedicine. 2014 Oct 15;21(12):1534-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2014
Author
Alexander N Shikov
Olga N Pozharitskaya
Marina N Makarova
Valery G Makarov
Hildebert Wagner
Source
Phytomedicine. 2014 Oct 15;21(12):1534-42
Date
Oct-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Ethnopharmacology
Humans
Medicine, Traditional
Mongolia
Phytochemicals - pharmacology
Plant Extracts - pharmacology
Plant Leaves - chemistry
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Rhizome - chemistry
Russia
Saxifragaceae - chemistry
Tibet
Abstract
Bergenia crassifolia (L.) Fritsch, a species in the Bergenia genus belongs to the family Saxifragaceae, is valuated for its medicinal application. The review focuses on the medicinal uses, phytochemistry, and the biological activities of B. crassifolia to explore its benefits and potential uses.
In this review, we summarized data, published in Russia and in other countries related to B. crassifolia.
Rhizomes and leaves of this plant are in use as traditional remedies for the treatment of different disorders in the folk medicine systems of Russia and Asia. The plant is a potential source of tannins, benzanoids, flavonoids, polysaccharides and other active compounds. Due to the presence of a multitude of bioactives, a wide array of pharmacological activities have been ascribed to different parts of this herb and individual compounds, which include adaptogenic, antiinflammatory, antihypertensive, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antiobesity, antitussive, cerebro-protective, hepatoprotective, immunomodulating, and diuretic.
The review highlights the potential of B. crassifolia for further development of herbal medicines on its base.
PubMed ID
25442262 View in PubMed
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Biodiversity prospecting and benefit-sharing: perspectives from the field.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212175
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1996 Apr;51(1-3):1-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
D D Soejarto
Author Affiliation
Program for Collaborative Research in the Pharmaceutical Sciences (PCRPS), College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois at Chicago 60612, USA.
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1996 Apr;51(1-3):1-15
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Botany - methods
Commerce
Conservation of Natural Resources
Developing Countries
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical - economics
Drug Industry - organization & administration
Ecosystem
Entrepreneurship - economics
Expeditions - economics
Humans
International Cooperation
Medicine, Traditional
Pharmacognosy
Plant Extracts - economics - supply & distribution
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry - classification
Research
Specimen Handling - methods
Abstract
Searching for new biologically active compounds from natural sources starts, obviously, in the field. Plant, microbial or animal materials to be sought and investigated may be selected through a number of approaches. No matter what selection criterion(a) is (are) used, the first step in obtaining the organism concerned is to undertake field collecting work to search for and to collect the organism. Good knowledge on the ecogeographic distribution and precision in the taxonomic identification of the organism(s) sought are crucial if the field work involves the search for a pre-determined organism or set of organisms. Such knowledge and precision during field work are of secondary importance, however, if the search and collection are based on biodiversity or ethnomedical uses, since accurate taxonomic identification may be made at a later date, in a Museum or Herbarium environment. When an individual or institution from a biotechnologically developed country wishes to obtain indigenous raw biological material from a biotechnologically less developed country, an agreement for the procurement of such raw material may be negotiated. Since the effort to search and develop a biologically active compound(s) from natural sources is a long-term process that involves teamwork between field and laboratory scientists, the success of the endeavor will depend in large part on the continued flow of raw material from the field. Goodwill to maintain such a flow may be achieved through appropriate scientific and monetary compensations, both in real-time and in long-term sharing of the benefits of discovery. Only with the prospect of financial return to the supplying country will there be an incentive for the protection of the natural resources towards sustainable use and development, as well as to allow time for continuing explorations and discoveries.
PubMed ID
9213606 View in PubMed
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43 records – page 1 of 5.