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11 records – page 1 of 2.

[Androsace septentrionalis (author's transl)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74627
Source
Planta Med. 1975 May;27(3):262-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1975
Author
W S Sokolow
L N Surina
Source
Planta Med. 1975 May;27(3):262-3
Date
May-1975
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Contraceptive Agents - isolation & purification
English Abstract
Female
Mice
Plants, Medicinal - analysis
Siberia
Tranquilizing Agents - isolation & purification
Abstract
Morphology, culture requirements, and medicinal effects of Androsace septentrionalis L. (Primulaceae) are described. In mice, water extracts of the plant (.5 ml/100g body weight) produced disturbances of the menstrual cycle and infertility after copulation. Histological studies showed enlargement of glandular mucosa cells and increased uterine connective tissue. Compared with controls, more corpora lutea were found in the fallopian tubes of treated animals. The plant is used in Siberian folk medicine for angina, heart diseases, epilepsy, gonorrhea, and as a contraceptive. The contraceptive and tranquilizing effects of the water extract of Androsace were evident in this experimentation.
PubMed ID
1161892 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Biologically active compounds from certain species and varieties of beans]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49032
Source
Farm Zh. 1975 Mar-Apr;(2):84-6
Publication Type
Article

Chemical bases for medicinal plant use in Oaxaca, Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239108
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1985 Mar;13(1):57-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1985
Author
B R Ortiz de Montellano
C H Browner
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1985 Mar;13(1):57-88
Date
Mar-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemical Phenomena
Chemistry
Dysmenorrhea - drug therapy
Female
Genital Diseases, Female - drug therapy
Humans
Indians, North American
Infertility, Female - drug therapy
Mexico
Plants, Medicinal - analysis
Postpartum Hemorrhage - drug therapy
Pregnancy
Uterine Hemorrhage - drug therapy
Uterus - drug effects
Abstract
Fifty-eight medicinal plants used for the management of reproduction and the treatment of women's reproductive health problems in an indigenous community in southern Mexico are described. The efficacy of these plants is assessed according to both community members' understandings of the therapeutic effects they seek and the standards of conventional Western medicine. The majority of the plants contain chemicals which would appear to enable them to accomplish their intended effects in either or both the popular and the conventional medical systems.
PubMed ID
3872966 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fatal intoxications in Denmark following intake of morphine from opium poppies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233964
Source
Z Rechtsmed. 1988;101(3):197-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
A. Steentoft
E. Kaa
K. Worm
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Chemistry. University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Z Rechtsmed. 1988;101(3):197-204
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Morphine - analysis - poisoning
Opium - analysis - poisoning
Papaver - analysis
Plants, Medicinal - analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
In Denmark it is legal to grow opium poppies for the production of poppy seeds and until 1986 for decoration purposes, too. Danish poppy capsules contain 0.3-5 mg morphine per capsule and the content of morphine in opium exuded from the capsules may amount to 24%. This has resulted in misuse as both fresh and dried poppy capsules have been used for the production of "opium tea". During the period 1982-1985, seven casualties occurred among drug addicts in Denmark which were solely or partly caused by these opium poppies.
PubMed ID
3227727 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Farm Zh. 1974;29(3):94-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1974
Author
O A Svishchuk
M K Makhnovskii
Source
Farm Zh. 1974;29(3):94-5
Date
1974
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Menthol - chemical synthesis
Plants, Medicinal - analysis
PubMed ID
4840955 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Modified photoelectrocolorimetric method of determining morphine in poppy pods, in aqueous extracts and in alcohol-ammonia eluates]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13426
Source
Farm Zh. 1972 Nov-Dec;27(6):48-52
Publication Type
Article

Records of usage or assays in Phyllanthus (Euphorbiaceae). I. Subgenera Isocladus, Kirganelia, Cicca and Emblica.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228275
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1990 Oct;30(3):233-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1990
Author
D W Unander
G L Webster
B S Blumberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Population Science, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111.
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1990 Oct;30(3):233-64
Date
Oct-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Medicine, Traditional
Plants, Medicinal - analysis - classification
Abstract
References to either indigenous uses or the results of controlled assays are numerous for species of Phyllanthus (Euphorbiaceae). These citations have been arranged by subgenus, section, subsection and species and will be published as three separate papers, followed by a paper discussing the apparent clustering of some uses or effects within taxa. This paper, the first of the series, covers the subgenera Isocladus, Kirganelia, Cicca and Emblica.
PubMed ID
2259214 View in PubMed
Less detail

Studies on the traditional herbal anthelmintic Chenopodium ambrosioides L.: ethnopharmacological evaluation and clinical field trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239537
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1985;21(8):879-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
M M Kliks
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1985;21(8):879-86
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthelmintics - therapeutic use
Ascariasis - drug therapy
Chromatography, Gas
Clinical Trials as Topic
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Evaluation
Ethnic Groups
History, 18th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Medicine, Traditional
Mexico
Monoterpenes
Peroxides
Plants, Medicinal - analysis
Rural Population
Terpenes - analysis
Abstract
Infusions and decoctions of the leaves, roots and inflorescences of the herbaceous shrub Chenopodium ambrosioides (American wormseed, goosefoot, epazote, paico) and related species indigenous to the New World have been used for centuries as dietary condiments and as traditional anthelmintics by native peoples for the treatment of intestinal worms. Commercial preparations of oil of chenopodium and its active constituent, ascaridol, obtained by steam distillation, have been and continue to be, used with considerable success in mass treatment campaigns. Ethnopharmacological studies in a community of Mayan subsistence farmers in Chiapas, Mexico, confirmed that decoctions containing up to 300 mg of dry plant material per kg body weight (MGKGW) were widely used and traditionally highly regarded in the treatment of ascariasis. However, therapeutic doses of up to 6000 MGKGW of powdered, dried plant had no significant anthelmintic effect on the adults of Necator, Trichuris of Ascaris. Gas-liquid chromatographic analyses of plant samples used consistently demonstrated the presence of ascaridol in the expected amounts. Possible origins of subjective belief in the efficacy of C. ambrosioides as used, may be related to the positive association of spontaneous, or peristalsis-induced passage of senescent worms immediately following a therapeutic episode. It is also possible that in the past varieties of the plant containing much more ascaridol were used. The results of these controlled field studies did not sustain widely held traditional beliefs, nor the value of therapeutic practices regarding this plant. It is, therefore, essential that all indigenous ethnomedical practices be objectively evaluated for efficacy and safety using appropriate protocols before being considered for adoptation or promotion in health care programs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
3906906 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The effect of drying on the composition of medicinal plants. I. Qualitative changes in the composition of Populus nigra L. leaves]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13454
Source
Farm Zh. 1972;27(4):65-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1972

11 records – page 1 of 2.