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263 records – page 1 of 27.

A 300-million-year record of atmospheric carbon dioxide from fossil plant cuticles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95961
Source
Nature. 2001 May 17;411(6835):287-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-2001
Author
Retallack G J
Author Affiliation
Department of Geological Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene 97403-1272, USA. gregr@darkwing.uoregon.edu
Source
Nature. 2001 May 17;411(6835):287-90
Date
May-17-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atmosphere - chemistry
Carbon Dioxide - metabolism
Cold Climate
Fossils
Ginkgo biloba - cytology - growth & development - metabolism
Greenhouse Effect
Ice
Methane - metabolism
Phylogeny
Plant Leaves - cytology - growth & development - metabolism
Plants, Medicinal
Pollen
Seasons
Water - metabolism
Abstract
To understand better the link between atmospheric CO2 concentrations and climate over geological time, records of past CO2 are reconstructed from geochemical proxies. Although these records have provided us with a broad picture of CO2 variation throughout the Phanerozoic eon (the past 544 Myr), inconsistencies and gaps remain that still need to be resolved. Here I present a continuous 300-Myr record of stomatal abundance from fossil leaves of four genera of plants that are closely related to the present-day Ginkgo tree. Using the known relationship between leaf stomatal abundance and growing season CO2 concentrations, I reconstruct past atmospheric CO2 concentrations. For the past 300 Myr, only two intervals of low CO2 (2,000 p.p.m.v.) concentrations. These results are consistent with some reconstructions of past CO2 (refs 1, 2) and palaeotemperature records, but suggest that CO2 reconstructions based on carbon isotope proxies may be compromised by episodic outbursts of isotopically light methane. These results support the role of water vapour, methane and CO2 in greenhouse climate warming over the past 300 Myr.
Notes
Comment In: Nature. 2001 May 17;411(6835):247-811357108
PubMed ID
11357126 View in PubMed
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[Abuse of statistics in the treatment with ginseng].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214102
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Oct 11;92(41):3771
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-11-1995
Author
A. Andrén-Sandberg
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Oct 11;92(41):3771
Date
Oct-11-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Panax
Plants, Medicinal
Statistics as Topic
Sweden
Notes
Comment On: Lakartidningen. 1995 Oct 11;92(41):3771-27564624
PubMed ID
7564623 View in PubMed
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Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1970 Jan-Feb;1:30
Publication Type
Article
Author
I P Avramenko
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1970 Jan-Feb;1:30
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cestode Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - pathology
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Plants, Medicinal
PubMed ID
5529376 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of extrusion cooked cereal/legume weaning food supplements to Ghanaian mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195584
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2001 Jan;52(1):83-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
Y. Mensa-Wilmot
R D Phillips
S. Sefa-Dedeh
Author Affiliation
Center for Food Safety and Quality Enhancement-Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, Agricultural Experiment Station, Griffin, GA 30223-1797, USA.
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2001 Jan;52(1):83-90
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cereals
Chi-Square Distribution
Consumer Satisfaction
Dietary Supplements
Fabaceae
Female
Focus Groups
Food Handling
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Mothers
Plants, Medicinal
Software
Weaning
Abstract
Six cereal/legume mixtures were developed with the aid of computer-assisted optimization software from cereal and legume staples indigenous to the West African sub-region. The mixtures had 45-50% maize, 35-40% decorticated cowpeas and either blanched peanuts or decorticated soybeans as a source of lipid and complementary amino acids. Three processing schemes involving roasting, amylase digestion and extrusion cooking were employed. The proportion of ingredients in each cereal/legume blend was based on meeting the nutrient requirement of the 0.5-0.9-year-old infant and cost considerations. Nutrient composition of the blends (proximate, amino acid, mineral and vitamin composition) indicated that these formulations were adequate nutritionally as weaning supplements (Mensa-Wilmot et al, 2000a,2000b). These formulations were evaluated by mothers of weanling children based on their preferences with respect to color, flavor, texture and willingness to purchase the product assessed. A total of 133 one-on-one interviews and 23 group discussions were conducted (involving 6-12 respondents) with selected Ghanaian women. The mothers found the convenience of a weaning food made from local staples that could be processed on village/market scale very attractive.
PubMed ID
11225182 View in PubMed
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Activation of PPARgamma by metabolites from the flowers of purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99024
Source
J Nat Prod. 2009 May 22;72(5):933-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-22-2009
Author
Kathrine B Christensen
Rasmus K Petersen
Sidsel Petersen
Karsten Kristiansen
Lars P Christensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, University of Aarhus, Kirstinebjergvej 10, 5792 Aarslev, Denmark. kbch@kbm.sdu.dk
Source
J Nat Prod. 2009 May 22;72(5):933-7
Date
May-22-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3T3-L1 Cells
Animals
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Echinacea - chemistry
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Flowers - chemistry
Glucose - metabolism
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Mice
PPAR gamma - drug effects - metabolism
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Abstract
Thiazolidinediones are insulin sensitizing drugs that target the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma. An n-hexane extract of the flowers of Echinacea purpurea was found to activate PPARgamma without stimulating adipocyte differentiation. Bioassay-guided fractionations yielded five alkamides, of which one was new, and three fatty acids that all activated PPARgamma. The new alkamide hexadeca-2E,9Z,12Z,14E-tetraenoic acid isobutylamide (5) was identified by analysis of spectroscopic data and found to activate PPARgamma with no concurrent stimulation of adipocyte differentiation. Compound 5 was further shown to increase insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. The data suggest that flowers of E. purpurea contain compounds with potential to manage insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.
PubMed ID
19374389 View in PubMed
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[Activity of cytoplasmic proteinases from rat liver in Heren's carcinoma during tumor growth and treatment with medicinal herbs]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20009
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2000 May-Jun;72(3):91-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
M M Marchenko
H P Kopyl'chuk
O V Hrygor'ieva
Author Affiliation
Yu. Fedkovich Chernivtsi State University, Ukraine.
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2000 May-Jun;72(3):91-4
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cytoplasm - enzymology
English Abstract
Hydrolysis
Liver - enzymology - pathology
Liver Neoplasms - enzymology
Organ Size - drug effects
Plant Extracts - pharmacology
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Rats
Abstract
The dynamics of the acid and neutral proteinases general enzymes activity change in the hepatocytes postnuclear fraction in the rats suffering from the Heren's carcinoma was investigated. It was determined that in the tumor development of the enzyme activity level of both the acid and neutral proteinases increased 2,6-fold. The natural preparation of the herbs (Calendula officinalis L., Echinacea purpurea L., Scorzonera humilis L., Aconitum moldavicum Hacq.) normalizes both the activity of the investigated enzymes and coefficients of the liver weights of the sick animals. The chemical medicinal preparation 5,6-benzcumarine-5-uracil normalizes the activity of the neutral cytoplasmatic proteinases and reduces the level of the proteolytic activity of the acid enzymes in comparison with the control group of the animals as well as increases of the liver weight coefficients.
PubMed ID
11200483 View in PubMed
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Adipogenic constituents from the bark of Larix laricina du Roi (K. Koch; Pinaceae), an important medicinal plant used traditionally by the Cree of Eeyou Istchee (Quebec, Canada) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124851
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 2012 Jun 14;141(3):1051-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-14-2012
Author
Nan Shang
José A Guerrero-Analco
Lina Musallam
Ammar Saleem
Asim Muhammad
Brendan Walshe-Roussel
Alain Cuerrier
John T Arnason
Pierre S Haddad
Author Affiliation
Natural Health Products and Metabolic Disease Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC H3T 1J4, Canada.
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 2012 Jun 14;141(3):1051-7
Date
Jun-14-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3T3-L1 Cells
Adipogenesis - drug effects
Animals
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - analysis - pharmacology
Indians, North American
Larix
Medicine, Traditional
Mice
Plant Bark - chemistry
Plant Extracts - analysis - pharmacology
Plants, Medicinal
Quebec
Triterpenes - analysis - pharmacology
Abstract
Diabetes is a growing epidemic worldwide, especially among indigenous populations. Larix laricina was identified through an ethnobotanical survey as a traditional medicine used by Healers and Elders of the Cree of Eeyou Istchee of northern Quebec to treat symptoms of diabetes and subsequent in vitro screening confirmed its potential.
We used a bioassay-guided fractionation approach to isolate the active principles responsible for the adipogenic activity of the organic extract (80% EtOH) of the bark of Larix laricina. Post-confluent 3T3-L1 cells were differentiated in the presence or absence of the crude extract, fractions or isolates of Larix laricina for 7 days, then triglycerides content was measured using AdipoRed reagent.
We identified a new cycloartane triterpene (compound 1), which strongly enhanced adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells with an EC(50) of 7.7 µM. It is responsible for two thirds of the activity of the active fraction of Larix laricina. The structure of compound 1 was established on the basis of spectroscopic methods (IR, HREIMS, 1D and 2D NMR) as 23-oxo-3a-hydroxycycloart-24-en-26-oic acid. We also identified several known compounds, including three labdane-type diterpenes (compounds 2-4), two tetrahydrofuran-type lignans (compounds 5-6), three stilbenes (compounds 7-9), and taxifolin (compound 10). Compound 2 (13-epitorulosol) also potentiated adipogenesis (EC(50) 8.2 µM) and this is the first report of a biological activity for this compound.
This is the first report of putative antidiabetic principles isolated from Larix laricina, therefore increasing the interest in medicinal plants from the Cree pharmacopeia.
PubMed ID
22542642 View in PubMed
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Alternative therapy for atopic dermatitis and psoriasis: patient-reported motivation, information source and effect.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103927
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1990;70(5):425-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
P. Jensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1990;70(5):425-8
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Complementary Therapies - statistics & numerical data
Consumer Satisfaction
Dermatitis, Atopic - diet therapy - therapy
Homeopathy
Humans
Mass Media
Norway
Patients - psychology
Plants, Medicinal
Psoriasis - diet therapy - therapy
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In a questionnaire study, 227 patients with atopic dermatitis and 215 with psoriasis, who had used alternative medicine, were asked to state their main reason for trying alternative medicine. The answers indicated that the absence of satisfactory effect of physician-provided therapy was the most decisive factor. Their main information sources on alternative therapies were persons without skin disease, and the mass media. The majority reported no improvement, or even aggravation of their skin disease, as a result of alternative treatments (except for diet changes). These findings emphasize the need for documentation of effect of alternative medicine, as well as for further research and education efforts in order to improve therapy for atopic dermatitis and psoriasis.
PubMed ID
1980978 View in PubMed
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An analysis of two indigenous reproductive health illnesses in a Nahua community in Veracruz, Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121378
Source
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2012;8:33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Vania Smith-Oka
Author Affiliation
Anthropology Department, 611 Flanner Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA. vsmithok@nd.edu
Source
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2012;8:33
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Medicine, Traditional
Mexico
Middle Aged
Midwifery
Phytotherapy
Plant Preparations - therapeutic use
Plants, Medicinal
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - drug therapy
Qualitative Research
Reproductive health
Uterine Prolapse - drug therapy - etiology
Wasting Syndrome - drug therapy - etiology
Women's health
Young Adult
Abstract
This article describes the local concepts indigenous Nahua women hold regarding their reproduction. Specifically it provides a description of two indigenous illnesses--isihuayo and necaxantle, it discusses their etiology, symptoms, and treatments, and it analyzes them within the local ethnomedical framework and sociopolitical context. A perception of female vulnerability is shown to be an underlying shaper of women's experiences of these illnesses.
This research took place in a small Nahua village in Mexico. Qualitative data on local perceptions of these illnesses were collected by a combination of participant observation and interviews. Ethnobotanical data was obtained through interviews, and medicinal plants were collected in home gardens, fields, stream banks, and forested areas. The total study population consisted of traditional birth attendants (N = 5), clinicians (N = 8), and laywomen (N = 48).
Results showed that 20% of the village women had suffered from one or both of these illnesses. The article includes a detailed description of the etiology, symptoms, and treatments of these illnesses. Data shows that they were caused by mechanical, physical, and social factors related to a woman's weakness and/or lack of support. Traditional birth attendants often treated women's illnesses. Five medicinal plants were salient in the treatment of these illnesses: Ocimum basilicum L., Mentzelia aspera L., Pedilanthus tithymaloides (L.) Poit., and Piper umbellatum L. were used for isihuayo, while Solanum wendlandii Hook f. was used for necaxantle.
The research on these two ethnomedical conditions is a useful case study to understanding how indigenous women experience reproductive health. Reproductive health is not simply about clinically-based medicine but is also about how biomedicine intersects with the local bodily concepts. By describing and analyzing indigenous women's ill health, one can focus upon the combination of causes--which extend beyond the physical body and into the larger structure that the women exist in.
Notes
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Cites: J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Jan 30;121(3):383-9919041707
PubMed ID
22913545 View in PubMed
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263 records – page 1 of 27.