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[Characteristics of amaranth oil effect on the antioxidant system of the liver and blood in mice with malignant lymphoma growth]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79533
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2006 Jan-Feb;78(1):117-23
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ielisieieva O P
Kamins'kyi D V
Cherkas A P
Ambarova L I
Vyshemyrs'ka L D
Dzhura O R
Semen Kh O
Makhotina O O
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2006 Jan-Feb;78(1):117-23
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Amaranthus - chemistry
Animals
Antioxidants - metabolism
Catalase - blood - metabolism
Cell Proliferation - drug effects
Glutathione Peroxidase - blood - metabolism
Lipid Peroxidation - drug effects
Lipid Peroxides - blood - metabolism
Liver - drug effects - enzymology - pathology
Lymphoma - blood - enzymology - pathology - prevention & control
Mice
Plant Oils - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Superoxide Dismutase - blood - metabolism
Abstract
The dynamics of functioning of the lipid peroxidation antioxidant activity system was studied during the tumor growth in the blood, liver and NK/Ly cells in mice fed with amaranth oil (100 microL/100 g, once a day, 10 days before inoculation and during tumor growth for 14 days). Different effects on antioxidant activity were demonstrated. Activity of the antioxidant enzymes in hepatocytes of mice fed with amaranth oil was aimed at maintenance of antioxidant defence in tumor growth. This effect was achieved owing to the marked increase in superoxide dismutase, preserved catalase and decreased glutathione peroxidase activities with simultaneous increase in hydroperoxides levels and decrease of thiobarbituric acid-reactive subspecies. Changes observed in NK/Ly lymphoma cells were directed to providing a higher prooxidant activity than in the liver cells. Modification of antioxidant activity induced by amaranth oil can maintain oxygen homeostasis, morphofunctional state and inhibit tumor cells proliferation.
PubMed ID
17147274 View in PubMed
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The ongoing battle against multi-resistant strains: in-vitro inhibition of hospital-acquired MRSA, VRE, Pseudomonas, ESBL E. coli and Klebsiella species in the presence of plant-derived antiseptic oils.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118508
Source
J Craniomaxillofac Surg. 2013 Jun;41(4):321-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Patrick H Warnke
Alexander J S Lott
Eugene Sherry
Joerg Wiltfang
Rainer Podschun
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. pwarnke@hotmail.com
Source
J Craniomaxillofac Surg. 2013 Jun;41(4):321-6
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Infective Agents, Local - pharmacology
Chlorhexidine - pharmacology
Cymbopogon
Disinfectants - pharmacology
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial - drug effects
Enterococcus - drug effects
Escherichia coli - drug effects
Ethanol - pharmacology
Eucalyptus
Humans
Immunodiffusion
Klebsiella pneumoniae - drug effects
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus - drug effects
Monoterpenes - pharmacology
Oils, Volatile - pharmacology
Phytotherapy - methods
Plant Oils - pharmacology
Pseudomonas aeruginosa - drug effects
Tea Tree Oil - pharmacology
Terpenes - pharmacology
Vancomycin Resistance
beta-Lactamases - drug effects
Abstract
The fight against hospital-acquired infections involving antibiotic-resistant microorganisms has become of critical concern to surgeons worldwide. In addition to the development of new effective antibiotic chemotherapy, exploration of 'forgotten' topical antibacterial agents from the pre-antibiotic era has recently gained new attention. We report the promising efficacy of plant-derived antiseptic oils used in traditional aboriginal and south-east Asian treatments such as Lemongrass, Eucalyptus and Tea Tree Oil in the inhibition of clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in the in-vitro setting. Large consistent zones of inhibition were observed for all three plant-derived oils tested in an agar diffusion test. The commonly used antibacterial agents chlorhexidine 0.1%, and ethanol (70%), and standard olive oil consistently demonstrated notably lower or no efficacy in regard to growth inhibition of strains. Notably, Lemongrass oil proved to be particularly active against gram-positive bacteria, while Tea Tree oil showed superior inhibition of gram-negative microorganisms. As proven in vitro, plant-derived antiseptic oils may represent a promising and affordable topical agent to support surgical treatment against multi-resistant and hospital-acquired infections.
PubMed ID
23199627 View in PubMed
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[The effect of peach kernel oil on the sexual maturation of female rats]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46322
Source
Eksp Klin Farmakol. 1998 May-Jun;61(3):43-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
L B Litvinova
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Reproductive Endocrinology, Ukrainian Institute of Pharmacotherapy of Endocrine Diseases, Ukrainian Ministry of Public Health, Kharkov, Ukraine.
Source
Eksp Klin Farmakol. 1998 May-Jun;61(3):43-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - drug effects
Animals
Body Weight - drug effects
Depression, Chemical
English Abstract
Female
Fruit
Growth - drug effects
Plant Oils - pharmacology
Rats
Seeds
Sexual Maturation - drug effects
Abstract
The effect of vegetable (peach kernel) oil on the somatic development and puberty of female rats was studied. The oil was injected (0.2 ml) once intramuscularly into the prepuberty (aged 35 days) or (at the age of 31-35 days) five times. The oil inhibited dose-dependently the somatic development of the rats before puberty. It inhibited the ovarian endocrine function, significantly delayed the initial (opening of the vagina) and terminal (ovulation) stages of puberty or suppressed it completely (in 30% of cases).
PubMed ID
9690077 View in PubMed
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