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Activation of flavonoid biosynthesis by solar radiation in bilberry ( Vaccinium myrtillus L) leaves.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9570
Source
Planta. 2004 Mar;218(5):721-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Laura Jaakola
Kaisu Määttä-Riihinen
Sirpa Kärenlampi
Anja Hohtola
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology/Botany, University of Oulu, POB 3000, 90014, Oulu, Finland. laura.jaakola@oulu.fi
Source
Planta. 2004 Mar;218(5):721-8
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization - physiology - radiation effects
Acyltransferases - genetics - metabolism
Alcohol Oxidoreductases - genetics - metabolism
Flavonoids - biosynthesis - radiation effects
Fruit - metabolism - radiation effects
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic - radiation effects
Gene Expression Regulation, Plant - radiation effects
Mixed Function Oxygenases - genetics - metabolism
Oxygenases - genetics - metabolism
Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase - genetics - metabolism
Plant Leaves - metabolism - radiation effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sunlight
Vaccinium myrtillus - genetics - metabolism - radiation effects
Abstract
The effect of solar radiation on flavonoid biosynthesis was studied in bilberry ( Vaccinium myrtillus L.) leaves. Expression of flavonoid pathway genes of bilberry was studied in the upper leaves of bilberry, exposed to direct sunlight, in the shaded leaves growing lower in the same plants and in fruits. Bilberry-specific digoxigenin-dUTP-labeled cDNA fragments of five genes from the general phenylpropanoid pathway coding phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and from the flavonoid pathway coding chalcone synthase, flavanone 3-hydroxylase, dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, and anthocyanidin synthase were used as probes in gene expression analysis. Anthocyanins, catechins, proanthocyanidins, flavonols and hydroxycinnamic acids from the leaves and fruits were identified and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography combined with a diode array detector. An increase in the expression of the studied flavonoid pathway genes was observed in leaves growing under direct sun exposure. Also, the concentrations of anthocyanins, catechins, flavonols and hydroxycinnamic acids were higher in the leaves exposed to direct sunlight. However, the concentration of polymeric procyanidins was lower in sun-exposed leaves, whereas that of prodelphinidins was slightly increased. The results give further support for the protective role of flavonoids and hydroxy cinnamic acids against high solar radiation in plants. Also, the roles of different flavonoid compounds as a defense against stress caused by sun exposure is discussed.
PubMed ID
14666422 View in PubMed
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Review of Russian research with radioactive particles: Foliar uptake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301105
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2019 Aug; 204:21-34
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Aug-2019
Author
S Fesenko
G Kozmin
N Sanzharova
V Epimakhov
Author Affiliation
Russian Institute for Radiology and Agro-Ecology, Obninsk, Russian Federation. Electronic address: corwin_17f@mail.ru.
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2019 Aug; 204:21-34
Date
Aug-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Crops, Agricultural - metabolism - radiation effects
Filtration
Models, Biological
Plant Leaves - metabolism - radiation effects
Radiation monitoring
Radioactivity
Radioisotopes - metabolism
Research
Russia
USSR
Abstract
Studies performed in the former Soviet Union were reviewed to provide interception and weathering values for radioactive particles. None of these studies were available in the English language literature before or were considered in the international reviews. The estimated mass interception fractions ranged 0.2-1.4?m2?kg-1 may be explained by the size of the particles used in the research. The interrelationships among the interception fractions, plants biomass and size of radioactive particles were determined for different plants: spring and winter wheat, maize, rice, pasture and sown grass. A filtration model rather accurately approximated data for pasture grass and some other crops but does not reflect properly patterns of the interception fraction dependence on biomass for perennial sown grass. The values derived have been compared with some expected values reported by the IAEA's Handbook of parameter values for the prediction of radionuclide transfer in temperate environments (TRS 472) where possible. The information presented can be used in the current updating of parameters recommended for environmental impact assessments.
PubMed ID
30954850 View in PubMed
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