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Antibacterial activity of some indigenous plants used for the treatment of wounds in the Eastern Cape, South Africa.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201258
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1999 Jul;66(1):103-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
D S Grierson
A J Afolayan
Author Affiliation
Botany Department, University of Fort Hare, Alice, South Africa.
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1999 Jul;66(1):103-6
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Bacteria - drug effects
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Humans
Medicine, African Traditional
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Plant Extracts - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Wound Healing - drug effects
Abstract
The use of medicinal plants in the world, and especially in South Africa, contributes significantly to primary health care. This paper presents the findings of an initial survey of plants used for the treatment of wounds in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Ethnomedical information gathered from surveys at clinics, hospitals as well as interviews with traditional healers and rural dwellers has revealed that Grewia occidentalis, Polystichum pungens, Cheilanthes viridis and Malva parvifolia are the most commonly used plants for the treatment of wounds in the province. The methanol extracts of G. occidentalis, P. pungens and C. viridis showed significant inhibition against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, while the acetone extract of P. pungens inhibited the gram-positive bacteria only. Extracts from M. parvifolia did not show any antibacterial activity at 5.0 mg/ml. Generally, the antibacterial property of the plants appears to have justified their use for the treatment of wounds, which are contaminated through bacterial infection, in the province.
PubMed ID
10432215 View in PubMed
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Antidiabetic effects of Justicia spicigera Schltdl (Acanthaceae).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122422
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 2012 Sep 28;143(2):455-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-28-2012
Author
Rolffy Ortiz-Andrade
Angel Cabañas-Wuan
Víctor E Arana-Argáez
Angel Josabad Alonso-Castro
Rocio Zapata-Bustos
Luis A Salazar-Olivo
Fabiola Domínguez
Marco Chávez
Candy Carranza-Álvarez
Alejandro García-Carrancá
Author Affiliation
Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán, Mérida, Yucatán, México. rolffy@uady.mx
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 2012 Sep 28;143(2):455-62
Date
Sep-28-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3T3 Cells
4-Chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Acanthaceae
Adipocytes - drug effects - metabolism
Animals
Antioxidants - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Benzothiazoles - metabolism
Cell Survival - drug effects
Cells, Cultured
Deoxyglucose - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental - drug therapy - metabolism
Ethanol - chemistry
Glucose - metabolism
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Kaempferols - analysis
Male
Mice
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Plant Leaves
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Solvents - chemistry
Sulfonic Acids - metabolism
Abstract
Justicia spicigera is a plant species used for the Teenak (Huesteca Potosina) and Mayan (Yucatan peninsula) indigenous for the empirical treatment of diabetes, infections and as stimulant.
To evaluate the cytotoxicity, antioxidant and antidiabetic properties of J. spicigera.
The effects of ethanolic extracts of J. spicigera (JSE) on the glucose uptake in insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant murine 3T3-F442A and human subcutaneous adipocytes was evaluated. The antioxidant activities of the extract of JSE was determined by ABTS and DPPH methods. Additionally, it was evaluated the antidiabetic properties of JSE on T2DM model.
JSE stimulated 2-NBDG uptake by insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant human and murine adipocytes in a concentration-dependent manner with higher potency than rosiglitazone 1mM. JSE showed antioxidant effects in vitro and induced glucose lowering effects in normoglycemic and STZ-induced diabetic rats.
The antidiabetic effects of administration of J. spicigera are related to the stimulation of glucose uptake in both insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant murine and human adipocytes and this evidence justify its empirical use in Traditional Medicine. In addition, J. spicigera exerts glucose lowering effects in normoglycemic and STZ-induced diabetic rats.
PubMed ID
22819688 View in PubMed
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The antioxidant response induced by Lonicera caerulaea berry extracts in animals bearing experimental solid tumors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92970
Source
Molecules. 2008;13(5):1195-206
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Gruia Maria Iuliana
Oprea Eliza
Gruia Ion
Negoita Valentina
Farcasanu Ileana Cornelia
Author Affiliation
Institute of Oncology Bucharest, 252 Fundeni, 022338, Bucharest, Romania.
Source
Molecules. 2008;13(5):1195-206
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antioxidants - metabolism
Cell Proliferation - drug effects
Ceruloplasmin - metabolism
Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor
Fruit - metabolism
Lipid Peroxidation - drug effects
Lonicera - metabolism
Male
Neoplasms, Experimental - drug therapy - pathology
Oxidation-Reduction - drug effects
Oxidative Stress - drug effects
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Sulfhydryl Compounds - metabolism
Abstract
Lonicera caerulea is a species of bush native to the Kamchatka Peninsula (Russian Far East) whose berries have been extensively studied due to their potential high antioxidant activity. The aim of our work was to investigate the in vivo effects of the antioxidant action of Lonicera caerulea berry extracts on the dynamics of experimentally-induced tumors. Our data showed that aqueous Lonicera caerulaea extracts reduced the tumor volume when administered continuously during the tumor growth and development stages, but augmented the tumor growth when the administration of extracts started three weeks before tumor grafting. Prolonged administration of Lonicera caerulaea berry extracts induced the antioxidant defense mechanism in the tumor tissues, while surprisingly amplifying the peripheral oxidative stress.
Notes
Erratum In: Molecules. 2009;14(2):893
PubMed ID
18560338 View in PubMed
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Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 2012 Jun 14;141(3):775-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-14-2012
Author
Teresa L Johnson
Jed W Fahey
Author Affiliation
Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of International Health, Center for Human Nutrition, Baltimore, MD, USA.
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 2012 Jun 14;141(3):775-9
Date
Jun-14-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - drug therapy
Analgesics - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Animals
Cimicifuga - chemistry
Female
Hot Flashes - drug therapy
Humans
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Plants, Medicinal
Premenstrual Syndrome - drug therapy
Abstract
Black cohosh (Actaea racemosa L.), Ranunculaceae, thrives in temperate climates east of the Mississippi River in the USA. It is economically important to the Appalachian region where it is wild harvested, but it has resisted most efforts at deliberate cultivation. Black cohosh has been used for many centuries both in Europe and in the US (by indigenous people and subsequent Caucasian medical practitioners), most notably for indications of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), menstrual pain and cramping.
To highlight black cohosh as an example in which disregard for the ethnobotanical and ethnopharmacologic usages of a plant has perhaps hindered modern scientific attempts to understand the mechanism of action of its bioactive phytochemicals, and ascribe cause to effect.
Research on its mode of action has historically focused on its presumed hormonal (phytoestrogenic) activity, but very recent work suggests that it may in fact be acting as an antinociceptive agent. Re-examination of some of the writings of 19th and 20th century physicians and folk literature suggests that this mode of action may have been overlooked in modern experimentalists' in vitro and animal studies and in the very few well conducted human trials to date.
The common folk perception of this plant as a "remedy for female problems" may thus require revision, as it may possess more general analgesic properties. In the broader context, ethnopharmacologic indications for other herbal remedies must be revisited in light of the explosion in understanding of mechanisms of action of small molecule effectors of which actein and cimicifugoside (from black cohosh) are only two examples.
PubMed ID
22504147 View in PubMed
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Carrier herbal medicine: traditional and contemporary plant use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5593
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1996 Jun;52(2):85-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
E M Ritch-Krc
S. Thomas
N J Turner
G H Towers
Author Affiliation
College of New Caledonia, Prince George, BC, Canada.
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1996 Jun;52(2):85-94
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Humans
Indians, North American
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Plants, Medicinal
Species Specificity
Abstract
The Carrier, an Athapaskan-speaking people of northcentral British Columbia, occupy the sub-boreal spruce forests of the central interior. This report, which is based on field study, documents some traditional and contemporary knowledge of the medicinal use of plants by the Carrier people. Important medicinal plants include: Abies lasiocarpa, Alnus incana, Arctostaphylos uva-ursi, Artemisia frigida, Fragaria virginiana, Juniperus communis, Picea glauca, Pinus contorta, Populus tremuloides, Rubus idaeus and Shepherdia canadensis.
PubMed ID
8735452 View in PubMed
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Characterization of the anxiolytic activity of Nunavik Rhodiola rosea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107793
Source
Planta Med. 2013 Oct;79(15):1385-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Christian Cayer
Fida Ahmed
Vicky Filion
Ammar Saleem
Alain Cuerrier
Marc Allard
Guy Rochefort
Zul Merali
John T Arnason
Author Affiliation
Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Planta Med. 2013 Oct;79(15):1385-91
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Animals
Anti-Anxiety Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Anxiety - drug therapy - metabolism
Behavior, Animal - drug effects
Canada
Carrier Proteins - metabolism
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Maze Learning
Medicine, Traditional
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Plant Roots
Plants, Medicinal
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Receptors, GABA-A - metabolism
Rhodiola
Abstract
Rhodiola rosea is a medicinal plant used by the indigenous Inuit people of Nunavik and Nunatsiavut, Eastern Canada, as a mental and physical rejuvenating agent. This traditional use led to the present investigation of R. rosea in the context of anxiety disorders. An alcohol extract of R. rosea roots was characterized phytochemically and orally administered for three consecutive days to Sprague-Dawley rats at 8 mg/kg, 25 mg/kg, and 75 mg/kg body weight. The rats were subjected to three behavioral paradigms of anxiety, including the elevated plus maze, social interaction, and contextual conditioned emotional response tests. Rhodiola rosea showed dose-dependent anxiolytic activity in the elevated plus maze and conditioned emotional response tests, with moderate effects in the higher-anxiety SI test. The active dose varied according to the anxiety test. In order to elucidate a mechanism, the extract was further tested in an in vitro GABAA-benzodiazepine receptor-binding assay, where it demonstrated low activity. This study provides the first comparative assessment of the anxiolytic activity of Nunavik R. rosea in several behaviour models and suggests that anxiolytic effects may be primarily mediated via pathways other than the GABAA-benzodiazepine site of the GABAA receptor.
PubMed ID
23975866 View in PubMed
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Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1994 Feb;60(2):94; author reply 94-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994

Constituents and pharmacological effects of Eucommia and Siberian ginseng.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46057
Source
Acta Pharmacol Sin. 2001 Dec;22(12):1057-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
T. Deyama
S. Nishibe
Y. Nakazawa
Author Affiliation
Central Research Laboratories, Yomeishu Seizo Co Ltd, Minowa-Machi, Kamiina-Gun, Nagano 399-4601, Japan. ymscrl@avis.ne.jp.
Source
Acta Pharmacol Sin. 2001 Dec;22(12):1057-70
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjuvants, Immunologic - pharmacology
Animals
Anti-Ulcer Agents - pharmacology
Antihypertensive Agents - pharmacology
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Collagen - biosynthesis - drug effects
Coumarins - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Depression - drug therapy
Eleutherococcus - chemistry
Eucommiaceae - chemistry
Fatigue - drug therapy
Furans - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Glucosides - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Humans
Iridoids - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Lignans - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Plant Extracts - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Rats
Stress - drug therapy
Abstract
The bark and leaves of Eucommia ulmoides Oliv (Eucommiaceae) and "Siberian ginseng" (Ezoukogi in Japanese) prepared from the root bark or stem bark of Eleutherococcus senticosus Maxim (Acanthopanax senticosus Harms) have been used as tonic and anti-stress drug. The extracts of Eucommia showed anti-hypertensive, anti-complementary, anti-oxidative, and anti-gastric ulcer effects, and promoting collagen synthesis, accelating granuloma formation, and other pharmacological effects. The Siberian ginseng exhibited anti-fatigue, anti-stress, immuno-enhancing effect, CNS activity, and anti-depressive effect. By now, 40, 28, and 10 compounds have been isolated from Eucommia ulmoides bark, Eucommia ulmoides leaves, and Siberian ginseng, respectively, and their structures were elucidated. Their pharmacological activities were mainly due to lignans and iridoid glycosides.
PubMed ID
11749801 View in PubMed
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Cytotoxic effect and induction of apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells by Antrodia camphorata.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106750
Source
Am J Chin Med. 2013;41(5):1169-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Pei-Yu Yang
Dan-Ning Hu
Fu-Shing Liu
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Research, Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan, ROC.
Source
Am J Chin Med. 2013;41(5):1169-80
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antrodia
Apoptosis - drug effects - genetics
Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Caspases - metabolism
Chromosomes, Human - genetics
Cytochromes c
DNA
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Gene Expression - drug effects
Hela Cells
Humans
Membrane Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Molecular Targeted Therapy
Nucleosomes
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Proto-Oncogene Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 - genetics - metabolism
Time Factors
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - drug therapy - genetics - pathology
bcl-2 Homologous Antagonist-Killer Protein - genetics - metabolism
bcl-Associated Death Protein - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
Antrodia camphorata is a Chinese herb indigenous to Taiwan. Previous reports demonstrated that it could induce apoptosis in some cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the apoptotic effect of the crude extract of A. camphorata in cervical cancer cells. Two human cervical cancer cell lines, HeLa and C-33A, were treated with extract of A. camphorata (10-1000 µg/mL). We found that A. camphorata extract was cytotoxic to both cervical cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner as examined by MTT assay. Treatment with A. camphorata extract at 400 µg/mL induced a 2.3- and 4.4-fold increase in oligonucleosome formation from the cleaved chromosomal DNA in HeLa and C-33A cells, respectively. A. camphorata extract also activated caspase-3, -8, and -9 activities and increased the cytosolic level of cytochrome c in both cell lines as the dosage increased. Furthermore, A. camphorata extract increased expressions of Bak, Bad and Bim, while decreasing expressions of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL of the Bcl-2 family proteins in HeLa and C-33A cells. The expression of IAP proteins, XIAP and survivin, was also decreased in both cervical cancer cells after treatment with A. camphorata. Our in vitro study suggests that A. camphorata is cytotoxic to cervical cancer cells through both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic mechanisms. It could be used as a novel phytotherapeutic agent or auxiliary therapy in the treatment of cervical cancer.
PubMed ID
24117076 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.