Skip header and navigation

Refine By

76 records – page 1 of 8.

[Activity of cytoplasmic proteinases from rat liver in Heren's carcinoma during tumor growth and treatment with medicinal herbs]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20009
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2000 May-Jun;72(3):91-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
M M Marchenko
H P Kopyl'chuk
O V Hrygor'ieva
Author Affiliation
Yu. Fedkovich Chernivtsi State University, Ukraine.
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2000 May-Jun;72(3):91-4
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cytoplasm - enzymology
English Abstract
Hydrolysis
Liver - enzymology - pathology
Liver Neoplasms - enzymology
Organ Size - drug effects
Plant Extracts - pharmacology
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Rats
Abstract
The dynamics of the acid and neutral proteinases general enzymes activity change in the hepatocytes postnuclear fraction in the rats suffering from the Heren's carcinoma was investigated. It was determined that in the tumor development of the enzyme activity level of both the acid and neutral proteinases increased 2,6-fold. The natural preparation of the herbs (Calendula officinalis L., Echinacea purpurea L., Scorzonera humilis L., Aconitum moldavicum Hacq.) normalizes both the activity of the investigated enzymes and coefficients of the liver weights of the sick animals. The chemical medicinal preparation 5,6-benzcumarine-5-uracil normalizes the activity of the neutral cytoplasmatic proteinases and reduces the level of the proteolytic activity of the acid enzymes in comparison with the control group of the animals as well as increases of the liver weight coefficients.
PubMed ID
11200483 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Anti-arrhythmic effect of phytoadaptogens]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10353
Source
Eksp Klin Farmakol. 2000 Jul-Aug;63(4):29-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
L A Maimeskulova
L N Maslov
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Experimental Cardiology, Siberian Division of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Tomsk, Russia.
Source
Eksp Klin Farmakol. 2000 Jul-Aug;63(4):29-31
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic Agonists
Animals
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - pharmacology
Arrhythmia - chemically induced - prevention & control
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Epinephrine
Injections, Intraventricular
Male
Naloxone - pharmacology
Narcotic Antagonists - pharmacology
Plant Extracts - pharmacology
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Receptors, Opioid - drug effects
Abstract
Repeated prophylactic administration of plant adaptogen preparations based on extracts from rhodiola, eleutherococcus, leuzea, and ginseng, produced a pronounced antiarrhythmic effect on the model of adrenal arrhythmia in animals. Preliminary opioid receptor block by naloxone reduced the protective effect of phytopreparations in the adapted animals. Intravenous and intracerebroventricular administration of naloxone (opioid receptor antagonist) showed that the anti-arrhythmic effect of rhodiola extract proceeds through the activation of both central and peripheral opioid receptors.
PubMed ID
11022302 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibacterial activity of some indigenous plants used for the treatment of wounds in the Eastern Cape, South Africa.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201258
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1999 Jul;66(1):103-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
D S Grierson
A J Afolayan
Author Affiliation
Botany Department, University of Fort Hare, Alice, South Africa.
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1999 Jul;66(1):103-6
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Bacteria - drug effects
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Humans
Medicine, African Traditional
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Plant Extracts - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry
Wound Healing - drug effects
Abstract
The use of medicinal plants in the world, and especially in South Africa, contributes significantly to primary health care. This paper presents the findings of an initial survey of plants used for the treatment of wounds in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Ethnomedical information gathered from surveys at clinics, hospitals as well as interviews with traditional healers and rural dwellers has revealed that Grewia occidentalis, Polystichum pungens, Cheilanthes viridis and Malva parvifolia are the most commonly used plants for the treatment of wounds in the province. The methanol extracts of G. occidentalis, P. pungens and C. viridis showed significant inhibition against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, while the acetone extract of P. pungens inhibited the gram-positive bacteria only. Extracts from M. parvifolia did not show any antibacterial activity at 5.0 mg/ml. Generally, the antibacterial property of the plants appears to have justified their use for the treatment of wounds, which are contaminated through bacterial infection, in the province.
PubMed ID
10432215 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibiotic screening of medicinal plants of the British Columbian native peoples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222967
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1992 Oct;37(3):213-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
A R McCutcheon
S M Ellis
R E Hancock
G H Towers
Author Affiliation
Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1992 Oct;37(3):213-23
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacteria - drug effects
British Columbia
Humans
Medicine, Traditional
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Plant Extracts - pharmacology
Plants, Medicinal
Abstract
One hundred methanolic plant extracts, 96 of which had documented medicinal uses by British Columbian native peoples, were screened for antibiotic activity against 11 bacterial strains. Eighty-five percent were found to have significant antibiotic activity against at least two of the bacteria tested. Ninety-five percent of the plants categorized as potential antibiotics based on their ethnobotanical usage were found to exhibit significant antibiotic activity. Seventy-five were found to be active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, 46 were active against an antibiotic supersusceptible strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 18 of these were also active against a wild type strain. The extracts with the broadest spectra of activity were prepared from: Alnus rubra bark and catkins, Fragaria chiloensis leaves, Moneses uniflora aerial parts, and Rhus glabra branches.
PubMed ID
1453710 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antidiabetic effects of Justicia spicigera Schltdl (Acanthaceae).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122422
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 2012 Sep 28;143(2):455-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-28-2012
Author
Rolffy Ortiz-Andrade
Angel Cabañas-Wuan
Víctor E Arana-Argáez
Angel Josabad Alonso-Castro
Rocio Zapata-Bustos
Luis A Salazar-Olivo
Fabiola Domínguez
Marco Chávez
Candy Carranza-Álvarez
Alejandro García-Carrancá
Author Affiliation
Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán, Mérida, Yucatán, México. rolffy@uady.mx
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 2012 Sep 28;143(2):455-62
Date
Sep-28-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3T3 Cells
4-Chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Acanthaceae
Adipocytes - drug effects - metabolism
Animals
Antioxidants - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Benzothiazoles - metabolism
Cell Survival - drug effects
Cells, Cultured
Deoxyglucose - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental - drug therapy - metabolism
Ethanol - chemistry
Glucose - metabolism
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Kaempferols - analysis
Male
Mice
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Plant Leaves
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Solvents - chemistry
Sulfonic Acids - metabolism
Abstract
Justicia spicigera is a plant species used for the Teenak (Huesteca Potosina) and Mayan (Yucatan peninsula) indigenous for the empirical treatment of diabetes, infections and as stimulant.
To evaluate the cytotoxicity, antioxidant and antidiabetic properties of J. spicigera.
The effects of ethanolic extracts of J. spicigera (JSE) on the glucose uptake in insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant murine 3T3-F442A and human subcutaneous adipocytes was evaluated. The antioxidant activities of the extract of JSE was determined by ABTS and DPPH methods. Additionally, it was evaluated the antidiabetic properties of JSE on T2DM model.
JSE stimulated 2-NBDG uptake by insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant human and murine adipocytes in a concentration-dependent manner with higher potency than rosiglitazone 1mM. JSE showed antioxidant effects in vitro and induced glucose lowering effects in normoglycemic and STZ-induced diabetic rats.
The antidiabetic effects of administration of J. spicigera are related to the stimulation of glucose uptake in both insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant murine and human adipocytes and this evidence justify its empirical use in Traditional Medicine. In addition, J. spicigera exerts glucose lowering effects in normoglycemic and STZ-induced diabetic rats.
PubMed ID
22819688 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antioxidant and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of ethanol extract and pure flavonoids from Adinandra nitida leaves.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141270
Source
Pharm Biol. 2010 Dec;48(12):1432-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Benguo Liu
Jiguo Yang
Yuxiang Ma
Erdong Yuan
Chungang Chen
Author Affiliation
School of Food Science, Henan Institute of Science and Technology, Xinxiang 453003, China. zzgclbg@126.com
Source
Pharm Biol. 2010 Dec;48(12):1432-8
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Antioxidants - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Ethanol - chemistry
Flavonoids - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Humans
Plant Extracts - pharmacology
Plant Leaves
Solvents - chemistry
Theaceae - chemistry
Abstract
Adinandra nitida Merr. ex. H.L. Li (Theaceae) is an indigenous plant in south China. Its leaves have been reported to have many curative effects such as reducing blood pressure, as well as antibacterial, antioxidant, and analgesic properties, which could be used in foods and medicines.
The antioxidant and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of the main flavonoids and ethanol extract (EE) of A. nitida leaves were investigated for the first time.
The main flavonoids of A. nitida leaves (camellianin A, camellianin B) were prepared and their contents in EE were determined by HPLC. The antioxidant activities of the samples were measured by DPPH radical scavenging assay and Rancimat test. The ACE inhibitory activities of the samples were carried out by using an assay kit with hippuryl-glycyl-glycine as substrate.
The contents of camellianin A, camellianin B and apigenin in EE were determined as 41.98, 2.67, and 1.73%, respectively. The antioxidant activities of the flavonoids were far lower than that of EE in DPPH radical scavenging and Rancimat assays. However, the ACE-inhibitory activities of camellianin A, camellianin B and apigenin were higher than that of EE.
The flavonoid content of EE was more than 45%. The high activities of EE in DPPH scavenging and Rancimat assay could be mainly attributed to compounds other than flavonoids. However, the ACE-inhibitory activity of EE could be mainly attributed to the presence of the flavonoids.
PubMed ID
20738217 View in PubMed
Less detail

The antioxidant response induced by Lonicera caerulaea berry extracts in animals bearing experimental solid tumors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92970
Source
Molecules. 2008;13(5):1195-206
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Gruia Maria Iuliana
Oprea Eliza
Gruia Ion
Negoita Valentina
Farcasanu Ileana Cornelia
Author Affiliation
Institute of Oncology Bucharest, 252 Fundeni, 022338, Bucharest, Romania.
Source
Molecules. 2008;13(5):1195-206
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antioxidants - metabolism
Cell Proliferation - drug effects
Ceruloplasmin - metabolism
Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor
Fruit - metabolism
Lipid Peroxidation - drug effects
Lonicera - metabolism
Male
Neoplasms, Experimental - drug therapy - pathology
Oxidation-Reduction - drug effects
Oxidative Stress - drug effects
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Sulfhydryl Compounds - metabolism
Abstract
Lonicera caerulea is a species of bush native to the Kamchatka Peninsula (Russian Far East) whose berries have been extensively studied due to their potential high antioxidant activity. The aim of our work was to investigate the in vivo effects of the antioxidant action of Lonicera caerulea berry extracts on the dynamics of experimentally-induced tumors. Our data showed that aqueous Lonicera caerulaea extracts reduced the tumor volume when administered continuously during the tumor growth and development stages, but augmented the tumor growth when the administration of extracts started three weeks before tumor grafting. Prolonged administration of Lonicera caerulaea berry extracts induced the antioxidant defense mechanism in the tumor tissues, while surprisingly amplifying the peripheral oxidative stress.
Notes
Erratum In: Molecules. 2009;14(2):893
PubMed ID
18560338 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antioxidative effects of Alisma orientale extract in palmitate-induced cellular injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121994
Source
Pharm Biol. 2012 Oct;50(10):1281-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Chang Woo Han
Eun Sil Kang
Sun Ah Ham
Hong Jung Woo
Jang Hoon Lee
Han Geuk Seo
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Pusan National University School of Korean Medicine, Yangsan, Korea.
Source
Pharm Biol. 2012 Oct;50(10):1281-8
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alisma - chemistry
Antioxidants - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Apoptosis - drug effects
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular
Cytoprotection - drug effects
Fatty Liver - drug therapy - pathology
Hep G2 Cells
Hepatoblastoma - metabolism
Humans
Liver Neoplasms - metabolism
MAP Kinase Signaling System - drug effects
Medicine, East Asian Traditional
Oxidative Stress - drug effects
Palmitates - toxicity
Plant Extracts - pharmacology
Reactive Oxygen Species - metabolism
Abstract
Alisma orientale (Sam.) Juzepczuk (Alismataceae) is an indigenous medicinal herb that has been traditionally used for diuretic, hypolipidemic, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic proposes in northern and eastern Asia.
This study examined the mechanisms underlying the cytoprotective effect of an aqueous extract of A. orientale (AEAO) against long-chain saturated fatty acid-induced cellular injury.
HepG2 cells were treated with 0.5 mM palmitate to generate a cellular model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Using this cellular model, the cytoprotective effect of AEAO (100 µg/mL) against long-chain saturated fatty acid-induced cellular injury was evaluated by measuring the steatosis, ROS accumulation, and apoptosis.
AEAO significantly attenuated palmitate-induced intracellular steatosis and cellular damage up to 54 and 33%, respectively. Palmitate-induced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive aldehydes were significantly reduced in the presence of AEAO to 40 and 75%, respectively, suggesting that oxidative stress plays a role in the palmitate-induced damage. AEAO inhibited the palmitate-mediated activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), a kinase that is correlated with NAFLD. Inhibition of JNK by SP600125 or addition of AEAO significantly reduced palmitate-induced steatosis, ROS accumulation, and apoptosis, indicating that the protective effects of AEAO against palmitate-induced cellular damage result from blocking ROS-activated JNK signaling.
The combined properties of AEAO in cellular steatosis and ROS production are beneficial for treating NAFLD, which includes complex metabolic changes, such that modulation of a single target is often not sufficient to achieve the desired therapeutic effect.
PubMed ID
22857151 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antitumorigenic and cytotoxic properties of an ethanol extract derived from Rhus verniciflua Stokes (RVS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192645
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2001 Oct 26;64(4):357-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2001
Author
D D Kitts
K T Lim
Author Affiliation
Food, Nutrition, and Health, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. ddkitts@unixg.ubc.ca
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2001 Oct 26;64(4):357-71
Date
Oct-26-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Cell Culture Techniques
Cell Death
Cell Division - drug effects
Chemoprevention
Copper - chemistry
DNA Damage - drug effects
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
Ethanol - chemistry
Free Radicals
Glycoproteins - isolation & purification - pharmacology
HeLa Cells - drug effects
Humans
Hydrogen Peroxide - pharmacology
Iron - pharmacology
Mice
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Neurons - drug effects
Oxidation-Reduction
Plant Extracts - pharmacology
Plasmids
Rhus
Abstract
In this study, the antioxidant, cytotoxic, and antitumorigenic activities of a fractionated, ethanol extract derived from Rhus verniciflua Stokes (RVS), a plant indigenous to Korea, China, and Japan, were determined. Physicochemical analysis and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) results indicated that the active component of a Sephadex G-150-fractionated RVS extract (PII fraction) was a copper-containing glycoprotein, possibly a plant laccase. Antioxidant activity of the fractionated RVS extract, observed in both aqueous and lipid in vitro oxidation reactions using 1,1-diphenyl 2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, site-specific Fenton-reaction deoxyribose, and a model lipid emulsion test system, indicated an affinity for protection against hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals. Cultured mouse brain neurons were protected against glucose oxidase-induced hydroxyl radical in the presence of the fractionated RVS extract (e.g., 58% protection at 4.9 microM and 95% protection with 22.7 microM RVS). RVS was further shown to protect against in vitro Fenton-reaction-induced single- and double-strand scission in supercoiled plasmid DNA. Further testing for bioactivity of the fractionated RVS extract was based on the affinity to inhibit cell proliferation in cultured HeLa and CT-26 tumor cells. The presence of RVS resulted in 70% cell death after 24 h of incubation in both cell lines at a minimum concentration of 2.48 microM RVS. Data demonstrate multiple bioactive chemopreventative properties of a Sephadex G-150-fractionated extract derived from RVS.
PubMed ID
11693493 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antitumour activity of Angelica archangelica leaf extract.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17115
Source
In Vivo. 2005 Jan-Feb;19(1):191-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Steinthor Sigurdsson
Helga M Ogmundsdottir
Jonas Hallgrimsson
Sigmundur Gudbjarnason
Author Affiliation
Science Institute, University of Iceland, Vatnsmyrarvegur 16, Reykjavik, Iceland. sts@raunvis.hi.is
Source
In Vivo. 2005 Jan-Feb;19(1):191-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Angelica archangelica
Animals
Antineoplastic Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy
Cell Division - drug effects
Comparative Study
Female
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Neoplasm Transplantation
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts - pharmacology
Plant Leaves - chemistry
Thymidine - metabolism
Transplantation, Isogeneic
Tritium - metabolism
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a leaf extract from A. archangelica on the growth of Crl mouse breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Materials and METHODS: The antiproliferative activity of the extract was measured by 3H-thymidine uptake in the Crl cells in vitro. Twenty mice were injected with the Crl cells, and 11 of them were fed A. archangelica leaf extract, and the progress of the tumours was followed. RESULTS: The leaf extract was mildly antiproliferative on the Crl cells with an EC50 of 87.6 microg/ml The antitumour activity of the extract was expressed in the mice by marked reduction in tumour growth. In the experimental animals, 9 out of 11 mice developed no or very small tumours, whereas control animals, not receiving the extract, developed significantly larger tumours (p
PubMed ID
15796173 View in PubMed
Less detail

76 records – page 1 of 8.