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319 records – page 1 of 32.

Acarbose for the treatment of type II diabetes: the results of a Canadian multi-centre trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214600
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1995 Aug;28 Suppl:S167-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
R G Josse
Author Affiliation
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1995 Aug;28 Suppl:S167-72
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acarbose
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Canada
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Diabetic diet
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Metformin - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Placebos
Sulfonylurea Compounds - therapeutic use
Time Factors
Trisaccharides - therapeutic use
Abstract
The treatment of Type II diabetes (NIDDM) includes an appropriate diet and prudent exercise program. If these measures are insufficient to control the blood sugar, oral agents (sulphonylureas or biguanides) or insulin are added to the therapeutic regimen. Although the diet prescription has undergone some changes and refinements, this approach has been the traditional treatment for NIDDM for nearly 40 years. Recently a new class of oral agents, the alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, has become available. These drugs are competitive inhibitors of the alpha-glucosidase enzymes in the brush border of the bowel wall. They act to slow and delay the rate of carbohydrate absorption, thereby decreasing postprandial hyperglycemia. A recent study was designed to evaluate the long-term efficacy of acarbose, an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, in improving the glycemic control of patients with NIDDM who were sub-optimally controlled on either diet alone, or diet plus sulphonylurea, metformin or insulin. A total of 354 patients with NIDDM were studied, 77 on diet alone, 83 on metformin, 103 and sulphonylurea and 91 on insulin. Subjects in each treatment stratum were randomized, double-blind to either acarbose or placebo, for 1 year. At baseline and every 3 months thereafter, fasting and postprandial glucose and C-peptide, HbA1c and fasting lipids were measured. Compared to placebo, acarbose treatment resulted in a decrease in mean postprandial glucose in all four strata (19 +/- 0.8 to 15.3 +/- 0.7 mmol/l: P
Notes
Erratum In: Diabetes Res Clin Pract 1995 Sep;29(3):215
PubMed ID
8529510 View in PubMed
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[A controlled trial of oat extract to break the tobacco habit in cigarette smokers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68125
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1977 Nov 14;139(46):2752-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-14-1977

Acupressure treatment of morning sickness in pregnancy. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63832
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2001 Mar;19(1):43-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
A J Norheim
E J Pedersen
V. Fønnebø
L. Berge
Author Affiliation
Havnegata General Practice, Harstad, Norway.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2001 Mar;19(1):43-7
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupressure - instrumentation - methods
Adult
Ambulatory Care - methods
Comparative Study
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Nausea - therapy
Norway
Placebos
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - therapy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Urban Population
Wrist - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To find out whether acupressure wristband can alleviate nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy. DESIGN: Double-blind, placebo-controlled study. SUBJECTS: 97 women with mean gestational length completed 8-12 weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Symptoms were recorded according to intensity, duration and nature of complaints. RESULTS: 71% of women in the intervention group reported both less intensive morning sickness and reduced duration of symptoms. The same tendency was seen in the placebo group, with 59% reporting less intensity and 63% shorter duration of symptoms. However, a significance level of 5% was reached only in the case of duration of symptoms, which was reduced by 2.74 hours in the intervention group compared to 0.85 hours in the placebo group (p = 0.018). CONCLUSIONS: Acupressure wristband might be an alternative therapy for morning sickness in early pregnancy, especially before pharmaceutical treatment is considered.
PubMed ID
11303547 View in PubMed
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Adjuvant growth hormone treatment during in vitro fertilization: a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64703
Source
Fertil Steril. 1994 Jul;62(1):113-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
C. Bergh
T. Hillensjö
M. Wikland
L. Nilsson
G. Borg
L. Hamberger
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Göteborg, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Fertil Steril. 1994 Jul;62(1):113-20
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjuvants, Pharmaceutic - therapeutic use
Adult
Blood - metabolism
Carrier Proteins - metabolism
Cleavage Stage, Ovum
Female
Fertilization
Fertilization in Vitro
Follicular Fluid - metabolism
Growth Hormone - therapeutic use
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 1
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Ovary - drug effects
Placebos
Recombinant Proteins - therapeutic use
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Somatomedins - metabolism
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To explore the effect of recombinant, human GH on follicular development and oocyte retrieval after gonadotropin stimulation with the addition of GH or placebo to a standard IVF treatment regimen. Further, to investigate whether GH is a more effective adjuvant if the standard treatment regimen is preceded by GH injections. DESIGN: A randomized, double-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled study. SETTING: The IVF unit at university hospital. PATIENTS: Forty normally ovulating women, age 25 to 38 years, with infertility because of tubal factors and being classified as "poor responders" with at least two previously performed and failed IVF attempts. INTERVENTIONS: Human, recombinant GH (Genotropin, Kabi Pharmacia, Uppsala, Sweden) or placebo (0.1 IU/kg body weight per day) was given SC as pretreatment during down regulation with GnRH and during stimulation with hMG according to the randomized protocol. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of oocytes retrieved after stimulation, total amount of gonadotropin used, time required for stimulation, number of follicles developing, rate of fertilization, and cleavage in vitro. Further, the quality of embryos, development of the endometrium, rate of clinical pregnancy, and serum and follicular fluid (FF) concentrations of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), and IGFBP-3 were estimated. RESULTS: The number of oocytes retrieved did not differ significantly between the groups, nor did the amount of hMG required for stimulation. The fertilization rate increased in patients who had received GH. Growth hormone caused a significant increase in serum and FF levels of IGF-I. An increase in serum IGFBP-3 could also be recorded in patients who had received GH. CONCLUSION: Although certain beneficial effects were noted in GH-treated patients, the overall results did not support GH as a clinically useful adjuvant treatment.
PubMed ID
7516295 View in PubMed
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AIDS trials, civil liberties and the social control of therapy: should we embrace new drugs with open arms?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229067
Source
CMAJ. 1990 May 15;142(10):1057-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-1990
Author
D A Salisbury
M T Schechter
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
CMAJ. 1990 May 15;142(10):1057-62
Date
May-15-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - drug therapy
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic
Health Policy
Human Rights
Humans
Placebos
Quality of Health Care
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Research
Notes
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1989 Mar;159(3):416-92915165
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1989 Mar;159(3):412-52915164
Cites: JAMA. 1988 Nov 25;260(20):3052-33184370
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1987 Jul 16;317(3):141-53600702
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1985 Jun 27;312(26):1665-713873614
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1984 May 24;310(21):1363-76717508
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 1989 May-Jun;19(3):14-202656580
Cites: Science. 1989 Jul 28;245(4916):345, 3472756418
Cites: Science. 1989 Oct 6;246(4926):19-212506644
Cites: Am J Med. 1982 Feb;72(2):233-407058834
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1979;32(1-2):51-63447779
Cites: CMAJ. 1989 Jun 15;140(12):1456-602720530
PubMed ID
2186850 View in PubMed
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An ethicist's commentary on the client who wants a placebo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170896
Source
Can Vet J. 2005 Oct;46(10):867-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005

'An innocent deception': placebo controls in the St Petersburg homeopathy trial, 1829-1830.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168511
Source
J R Soc Med. 2006 Jul;99(7):375-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
M E Dean
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Seebohm Rowntree Building, University of York, York YO10 5DD, UK. med5@york.ac.uk
Source
J R Soc Med. 2006 Jul;99(7):375-6
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic - history
History, 19th Century
Homeopathy - history
Humans
Placebos - history
Research Design
Russia
Notes
Cites: Altern Ther Health Med. 2000 Mar;6(2):58-6610710804
Cites: Psychopharmacol Bull. 1996;32(3):363-78961779
Cites: Schweiz Med Wochenschr. 1986 Jan 4;116(1):27-83511522
Comment In: J R Soc Med. 2006 Jul;99(7):32916816249
PubMed ID
16816271 View in PubMed
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An iterative method of estimating excess death rates and mortality ratios.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173307
Source
J Insur Med. 2000;32(4):212-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
S C Newman
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 3B7, Canada. stephen.newman@ualberta.ca
Source
J Insur Med. 2000;32(4):212-6
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - mortality - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Placebos
Risk Adjustment - methods
Abstract
To present a method of comparative mortality analysis of published data that can be applied when age- and sex-specific mortality rates for the study population are not available.
The quantitative method is described and illustrated using data from the SHEP study. A comparison is made with the results of Singer.
PubMed ID
16104368 View in PubMed
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319 records – page 1 of 32.