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277 records – page 1 of 28.

Abetting emigration of Canada's nurses and doctors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173514
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):8-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Mark Bernstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Toronto Division of Neurosurgery, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network.
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):8-9
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
North Carolina
Nursing Staff - supply & distribution
Physicians - supply & distribution
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Q. 2004;7(3):suppl 2-1115230179
PubMed ID
16078391 View in PubMed
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Access to and use of physician resources by the rural and urban populations in Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211550
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Jul-Aug;87(4):248-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
W K Fakhoury
L. Roos
Author Affiliation
Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation (MCHPE), Saint Boniface General Hospital Research Centre, Winnipeg.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Jul-Aug;87(4):248-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Manpower
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Manitoba
Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Physicians - supply & distribution - utilization
Rural Health - statistics & numerical data
Specialization
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This paper examines access to and use of the physician resources for ambulatory care by residents of Winnipeg and rural areas in Manitoba. Analyses were conducted on physician claims submitted to Manitoba Health in the fiscal years 1986-87 and 1991-92. The percentage of people who made contact with physicians, the number of visits per 100 residents, and the number of visits per user were used to asses changes between 1986 and 1991. There were important variations between residents of Winnipeg and the rural regions in access to and use of physicians' services across the years, and by physician specially. These variations accompanied a decrease in physician supply in the province.
PubMed ID
8870303 View in PubMed
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Access to patient services lacking: National Physician Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106453
Source
CMAJ. 2013 Dec 10;185(18):E813-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2013

Access to physician treatment for a mental disorder: a regional analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198775
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2000 Feb;35(2):61-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
H. Stuart
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health & Epidemiology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. hh11@post.queensu.ca
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2000 Feb;35(2):61-70
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Physicians - supply & distribution
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study examined (1) disparities in the proportion of persons who accessed a physician for treatment of a diagnosed mental disorder across 17 health regions in Alberta, Canada, and (2) the extent to which regional disparities in physician access could be explained by differences in regional demographies, population needs, or physician supply.
The study illustrates the use of ecological comparisons for regional health system performance evaluations. Regional characteristics were aggregated from four sources of data: the health insurance registry file (population denominators and regional demographies), physician claims data (treatment access), census data (social indicators of population need), and the medical directory of the College of Physicians of Surgeons (physician supply).
Regional variability in needs-adjusted measures of access to physician-based treatment services were comparatively small (varying by a factor of 1.6). Models containing adjustments for demography, need, and physician supply explained 41% of regional variation in access. Of the total variation explained, physician supply explained a smaller proportion (39%) in comparison to social demography and needs (61%). Few large regional imbalances were noted when needs-adjusted and supply-adjusted estimates were compared. Only two areas appeared to be underserviced in comparison to their local needs, reflecting approximately 6% of the provincial population.
While all three study factors proved important, findings support the broad conclusion that social demography and social risk (a proxy for need) will remain the key determinants predicting access to physician services for treatment of mental disorders in publicly funded health systems.
PubMed ID
10784368 View in PubMed
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[A doctor-manned ambulance service in Oslo].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110125
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1969 Apr 15;89(8):550-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1969

[Age discrimination and the shortage of physicians--Stop forcing us to retire].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272895
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jan Fohlman
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Date
2015
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ageism
Humans
Physicians - supply & distribution
Retirement - standards
Sweden
PubMed ID
26646966 View in PubMed
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Alaska's physician shortage: is enough being done to avoid a crisis?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152783
Source
Alaska Med. 2008 Sep;50:9-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008

Alberta doctors seek relief from oil patch boom.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167568
Source
CMAJ. 2006 Sep 12;175(6):571
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-12-2006
Author
Wayne Kondro
Source
CMAJ. 2006 Sep 12;175(6):571
Date
Sep-12-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Humans
Petroleum
Physicians - supply & distribution
Population Growth
Primary Health Care - economics
PubMed ID
16966655 View in PubMed
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American and Soviet medical manpower: growth and evolution, 1910-1970.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252835
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1975;5(3):455-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975
Author
M G Field
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1975;5(3):455-74
Date
1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Economics, Medical
Education, Medical
Female
Humans
Male
Medicine
Middle Aged
Physicians - supply & distribution
Physicians, Women - supply & distribution
Population Density
Residence Characteristics
Rural Health - manpower
Russia
Specialization
United States
Abstract
Between 1910 and 1970 the number of physicians in the United States increased 2.5 times, in Soviet Russia almost 25 times. The number of physicians per constant unit of population remained fairly stable in the United States, rising slightly in the last few years. In the U.S.S.R. that number increased 16 to 18 times, and now stands about 50 per cent higher than in the United States. About 10 per cent of American physicians are women; in the U.S.S.R. it is about 70 per cent. Neither society has resolved the problem of deploying physicians to the rural areas. American physicians are more specialized than their Soviet colleagues. The article concludes with general remarks about the two health systems, pointing out resemblances and divergences. The hypothesis of a possible "convergence" is entertained.
PubMed ID
128531 View in PubMed
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Anesthesia skills for rural family physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191088
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2002 Feb;48:324, 333
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002

277 records – page 1 of 28.