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253 records – page 1 of 26.

Abbreviations in Swedish Clinical Text--use by three professions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262983
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;205:720-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Elin Lövestam
Sumithra Velupillai
Maria Kvist
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;205:720-4
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abbreviations as Topic
Electronic Health Records - classification - statistics & numerical data
Natural Language Processing
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Nutritionists - statistics & numerical data
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Terminology as Topic
Abstract
A list of 266 abbreviations from dieticians' notes in patient records was used to extract the same abbreviations from patient records written by three professions: dieticians, nurses and physicians. A context analysis of 40 of the abbreviations showed that ambiguous meanings were common. Abbreviations used by dieticians were found to be used by other professions, but not always with the same meaning. This ambiguity of abbreviations might cause misunderstandings and put patient safety at risk.
PubMed ID
25160281 View in PubMed
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Absolute fracture risk reporting in clinical practice: a physician-centered survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159036
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2008 Apr;19(4):459-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
W D Leslie
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, 409 Tache Avenue, Winnipeg R2H 2A6 Manitoba, Canada. bleslie@sbgh.mb.ca
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2008 Apr;19(4):459-63
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Bone Density - physiology
Data Collection - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fractures, Bone - economics - prevention & control - radiography
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Osteoporosis - economics - physiopathology - radiotherapy
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice
Risk Assessment - economics - standards
Specialization - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Non-expert clinical practitioners who had received bone density reports based on 10-year absolute fracture risk were surveyed to determine their response to this new system. Absolute fracture risk reporting was well received and was strongly preferred to traditional T-score-based reporting. Non-specialist physicians were particularly supportive of risk-based bone mineral density (BMD) reporting.
Absolute risk estimation is preferable to risk categorization based upon BMD alone. The objective of this study was to specifically assess the response of non-expert clinical practitioners to this approach.
In January 2006, the Province of Manitoba, Canada, started reporting 10-year osteoporotic fracture risks for patients aged 50 years and older based on the hip T-score, gender, age, and multiple clinical risk factors. In May 2006 and October 2006, a brief anonymous survey was sent to all physicians who had requested a BMD test during 2005 and 206 responses were received.
When asked whether the report contained the information needed to manage patients, the mean score for the absolute fracture risk report was higher than for the T-score-based report (p
PubMed ID
18239957 View in PubMed
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Actinic keratosis: a cross-sectional study of disease characteristics and treatment patterns in Danish dermatology clinics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279478
Source
Int J Dermatol. 2016 Mar;55(3):309-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Andrés M Erlendsson
Henrik Egekvist
Henrik F Lorentzen
Peter A Philipsen
Birgitte Stausbøl-Grøn
Ida M Stender
Merete Haedersdal
Source
Int J Dermatol. 2016 Mar;55(3):309-16
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aminolevulinic Acid - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Aminoquinolines - therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - etiology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cryotherapy - utilization
Denmark
Dermatology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Keratosis, Actinic - complications - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatient clinics, hospital - statistics & numerical data
Photochemotherapy - utilization
Photosensitizing Agents - therapeutic use
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Private Practice - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The incidence of actinic keratosis (AK) is increasing, and several treatment options are available. The aim of this study was to describe clinical characteristics and treatment patterns in patients with AK treated by Danish dermatologists.
A multicenter, non-interventional, cross-sectional study was conducted. Three dermatology hospital departments and seven private dermatology clinics enrolled eligible AK patients consecutively during one week.
A total of 312 patients were included. Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) was previously reported in 51.0% of patients and currently suspected in 9.4% of AK-affected anatomical regions. Lesions of AK were located primarily on the face (38.6%), scalp (12.8%), and hands (11.2%). Actinic keratosis commonly presented with multiple AK lesions (38.6%) and field cancerization (38.5%). The treatments used most frequently were cryotherapy (57.7%) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) with methyl aminolevulinate (17.1%) and imiquimod (11.2%). The likelihood of receiving cryotherapy was higher for men (odds ratio [OR] 1.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10-2.47) and increased with age (2.2% per year, 0.4-4.0%). PDT represented the most frequently applied treatment for severe actinic damage and was more likely to be prescribed to women (OR 4.08, 95% CI 2.22-7.47) and young patients (OR 0.97 per year, 95% CI 0.95-0.99). The prevalence of severe actinic damage (17.3% versus 9.6%) and intake of immunosuppressive medication (29.0 versus 2.0) were higher among hospital patients compared with those treated in private practices (P 
PubMed ID
26276415 View in PubMed
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[Activities and staffing in intensive care units in Norway--still need of better registration].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195091
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 28;121(6):694-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-2001
Author
A. Fredriksen
Author Affiliation
Helsepolitisk avdeling Den norske laegeforening Postboks 1152 Sentrum 0107 Oslo. audun.fredriksen@legeforeningen.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 28;121(6):694-7
Date
Feb-28-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration - utilization
Medical Staff, Hospital - education - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - statistics & numerical data
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Standards in Intensive Care Medicine were approved by the Board of the Norwegian Medical Association in 1997. Their purpose is to clarify issues of responsibility, accountability and management in intensive care units. It also gives recommendations on management, staffing, education and resources.
In order to obtain a reference point for any future assessment of the impact of the Standards document, a survey was carried out, addressing work load, medical staff, and questions of accountability, responsibility and cooperation.
16 hospitals responded (76%). The results seem to indicate that medical staff in relation to work load is smaller than recommended. It also seems that junior doctors only to a small extent are present in the intensive care units during ordinary working hours, and consequently have little opportunity to learn from working with experienced colleagues. However, both conclusions, especially the first one, are not entirely reliable, as close examination of the answers indicate that important concepts concerning the description of work load and staffing are poorly defined, and that the monitoring of work load is insufficient.
It is concluded that staffing and work load in intensive care units are still insufficiently defined and monitored. The training environment for specialists is not optimal.
PubMed ID
11293351 View in PubMed
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Adherence to guidelines on antibiotic treatment for respiratory tract infections in various categories of physicians: a retrospective cross-sectional study of data from electronic patient records.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271494
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(7):e008096
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
David Tell
Sven Engström
Sigvard Mölstad
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(7):e008096
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Electronic Health Records
Female
General Practice - statistics & numerical data
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internship and Residency - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice Location
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To study how prescription patterns concerning respiratory tract infections differ between interns, residents, younger general practitioners (GPs), older GPs and locums.
Retrospective study of structured data from electronic patient records.
Data were obtained from 53 health centres and 3 out-of-hours units in Jönköping County, Sweden, through their common electronic medical record database.
All physicians working in primary care during the 2-year study period (1 November 2010 to 31 October 2012).
Physicians' adherence to current guidelines for respiratory tract infections regarding the use of antibiotics.
We found considerable differences in prescribing patterns between physician categories. The recommended antibiotic, phenoxymethylpenicillin, was more often prescribed by interns, residents and younger GPs, while older GPs and locums to a higher degree prescribed broad-spectrum antibiotics. The greatest differences were seen when the recommendation in guidelines was to refrain from antibiotics, as for acute bronchitis. Interns and residents most often followed guidelines, while compliance in descending order was: young GPs, older GPs and locums. We also noticed that male doctors were somewhat overall more restrictive with antibiotics than female doctors.
In general, primary care doctors followed national guidelines on choice of antibiotics when treating respiratory tract infections in children but to a lesser degree when treating adults. Refraining from antibiotics seems harder. Adherence to national guidelines could be improved, especially for acute bronchitis and pneumonia. This was especially true for older GPs and locums whose prescription patterns were distant from the prevailing guidelines.
Notes
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Mar;8(3):278-8211927025
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(5):366-7112069022
Cites: South Med J. 2001 Apr;94(4):365-911332898
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2001 Jun;47:1217-2411421050
Cites: J Eval Clin Pract. 2012 Apr;18(2):473-8421210896
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2011 Dec;66 Suppl 6:vi3-1222096064
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2009;27(4):208-1519929185
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2008 Nov;14(11):1722-3018976555
Cites: Lancet Infect Dis. 2008 Feb;8(2):125-3218222163
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2008 Jan;77(1):50-717185030
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2006 Sep;56(530):680-516954000
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1982 Jul;15(1):111-77086372
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 2004;36(2):139-4315061670
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2004 Jan;9(1):30-414762318
Cites: Lakartidningen. 2013 Apr 3-16;110(27-28):1282-423951882
PubMed ID
26179648 View in PubMed
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Adverse drug effects in elderly people -- a disparity between clinical examination and adverse effects self-reported by the patient.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164731
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2007 May;63(5):509-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Pasi Lampela
Sirpa Hartikainen
Raimo Sulkava
Risto Huupponen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, 70211, Kuopio, Finland. Pasi.Lampela@uku.fi
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2007 May;63(5):509-15
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Data Collection - methods
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Male
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Polypharmacy
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The trend towards polypharmacy is increasing among the elderly, and associated with this trend is an increased risk of adverse drug effects and drug-drug interactions. Our objective was to assess whether drug adverse effects reported by patients are in general agreement with those identified by a physician.
We evaluated the medication of 404 randomly selected individuals aged 75 years or older by means of interviews carried out by trained nurses and examinations conducted by a physician. The medication used by these patients was recorded prior to the physician's examination and modified thereafter if considered appropriate. Adverse effects noted by the physician were compared to those self-reported by the patients.
Almost all of the patients (98.8%) were using at least one drug, and the mean total number of drugs used was 6.5. Adverse effects were self-reported by 11.4% of the patients, whereas the physician observed apparent adverse drug effects in 24.0% of the patients. No adverse effects were reported in 53.2% of the patients. There were only seven patients that had adverse effects that were both self-reported and identified by the physician, and only four of these patients reported the same adverse effect that had been identified by the physician.
There was a great disparity between the adverse effects identified by the physician and those reported by the patients themselves. Based on our results, it would appear that elderly people tend to neglect adverse drug effects and may consider them to be an unavoidable part of normal ageing. Therefore, physicians should enquire about possible adverse effects even though elderly patients may not complain of any drug-related problems.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2007 Oct;63(10):979-80; author reply 98117618426
PubMed ID
17351768 View in PubMed
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Age differences in alcohol drinking patterns among Norwegian and German hospital doctors--a study based on national samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97824
Source
Ger Med Sci. 2010;8:Doc05
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Judith Rosta
Olaf G Aasland
Author Affiliation
The Research Institute of the Norwegian Medical Association, Oslo, Norway. judith.rosta@legeforeningen.no
Source
Ger Med Sci. 2010;8:Doc05
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Female
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Abstract
AIMS: To describe and discuss the alcohol drinking patterns of the younger generation of hospital doctors in Norway and Germany - respectively the abstainers, frequent drinkers, episodic heavy drinkers and hazardous drinkers. METHODS: Data were collected in nationwide postal surveys among doctors in Norway (2000) and Germany (2006). A representative sample of 1898 German and 602 Norwegian hospital doctors aged 27-65 years were included in the analyses (N=2500). Alcohol drinking patterns were measured using the first three items of AUDIT in Norway and the AUDIT-C in Germany, scores of >or=5 (ranking from 0 to 12) indicating hazardous drinking. Episodic heavy drinking was defined by the intake of >or=60 g of ethanol, on one occasion, at least once a week. Frequent drinkers were who drank alcoholic beverages at least twice a week. Abstainers were persons who drank no alcohol. The analyses were performed separately for age groups (27-44 years versus 45-65 years) and genders. RESULTS: Compared to the age groups 45 to 65 years in the Norwegian and German samples, the younger age groups (27-44 years) tend to have higher rates of abstainers, higher rates of infrequent drinking of moderate amount of alcoholic drinks, lower rates of episodic heavy drinking and lower rates of hazardous drinking. CONCLUSION: The younger generation of hospital doctors in Norway and Germany showed tendencies to healthier drinking habits. Changes in professional life, and in the attitude towards alcohol consumption, may go some way towards explaining these findings.
PubMed ID
20200658 View in PubMed
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Age of diagnosing physician impacts the incidence of thyroid cancer in a population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271219
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2014 Dec;25(12):1627-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Sapna Nagar
Briseis Aschebrook-Kilfoy
Edwin L Kaplan
Peter Angelos
Raymon H Grogan
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2014 Dec;25(12):1627-34
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Biopsy, Fine-Needle
Clinical Competence
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Physicians
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Registries
SEER Program
Thyroid Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Thyroid ultrasound and fine-needle aspiration (FNA) have been implicated in the overdiagnosis of thyroid cancer. To study how the use of diagnostic tools impacts thyroid cancer incidence, we propose using physician age as a surrogate. We aimed to determine whether thyroid cancer incidence is higher in areas with a high density of young physicians compared with areas with a high density of older physicians.
SEER 13 database was used to determine thyroid cancer incidence. These data were linked to the Area Resource File data (2000), containing information on physician age at a county-specific level. Cohorts were divided by age based on the concentration of physicians within a population of 1,000,000 persons. The study period was divided into two time periods (1992-1995, 2006-2009).
The incidence of thyroid cancer was stable in areas with high concentrations of young and older physicians during the 1992-1995 time period [
PubMed ID
25240802 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and cardiovascular mortality in US physicians: is there a modifier effect by low-density lipoprotein?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10998
Source
Arch Intern Med. 1997 Aug 11-25;157(15):1769-70
Publication Type
Article

Analysis of consensus among drug interaction databases with regard to combinations of psychotropics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309214
Source
Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2020 Feb; 126(2):126-132
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2020
Author
Jan Schjøtt
Pernille Schjøtt
Jörg Assmus
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Biochemistry and Pharmacology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2020 Feb; 126(2):126-132
Date
Feb-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Decision Support Systems, Clinical
Drug Interactions
Humans
Norway
Nursing Homes
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Psychotropic Drugs - administration & dosage - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
Drug interaction databases are important tools in today's clinical decision support. However, there is great variation with regard to classification and presentation of interactions among databases. The present study aimed to investigate consensus among databases with regard to combinations of psychotropics. A database integrated in Norwegian computerised clinical decision support systems and three international recommended subscription databases were compared. Combinations of psychotropics (two or more) prescribed to patients 65 years or older on a single day from three nursing homes in Bergen, Norway 16 years apart (2000 and 2016) were studied. The databases were compared in a common analysis with the following questions: interaction (no, not contraindicated or contraindicated), type (pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic), the total number of interactions, and the first ranked interaction among several in each patient. Consensus among the four drug interaction databases was associated with pharmacokinetic interactions involving mainly older psychotropics in the common analysis. The qualities that best characterised interactions with consensus was primarily the evidence including a description of manageability. There was a surprising lack of consensus with regard to contraindicated interactions, even when older psychotropics were involved. Lack of consensus decreased with the number of psychotropics in the combinations. This was mainly because the highest ranked interactions in the respective databases involved different drugs. We propose evidence and manageability as core factors when ranking and presenting interactions in clinical decision support.
PubMed ID
31468698 View in PubMed
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253 records – page 1 of 26.