Skip header and navigation

Refine By

151 records – page 1 of 16.

[28-year follow up of smoking habits of Swedish physicians. Reduced number of smokers but increased number of snuff-users]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67649
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Nov 27;93(48):4437-40, 4443-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-1996

[4000 physicians answered a health status questionnaire. Physicians' mental health is worse compared to general population]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72942
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Jan 31;93(5):317
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-1996

Abuse of residents: it's time to take action.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211834
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Jun 1;154(11):1705-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1996
Author
M F Myers
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Jun 1;154(11):1705-8
Date
Jun-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aggression
Canada
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians, Women - psychology
Prejudice
Sex Factors
Sexual Harassment
Abstract
The scientific study of the sexual dynamics that come into play during residency training seems to both fascinate and repel trainees and their supervisors. One of the more provocative and shameful dimensions of this area of inquiry, the abuse of residents, causes a good deal of distress. How do we respond to findings of significant psychological abuse, discrimination on the basis of sex or sexual orientation and sexual harassment in medical settings? How can we ignore over a decade of research? How can we not heed the experience of so many young physicians? Given the uncertain times in Canadian medicine and the insecurity in our professional and personal lives, we must work together to improve the culture of our teaching institutions and implement measures nationally and locally to close this dark chapter.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1984 Feb 10;251(6):739-426694276
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Apr 5;273(13):1056-77897792
Cites: JAMA. 1995 May 17;273(19):15537739086
Cites: JAMA. 1996 Feb 7;275(5):414-68569024
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Apr 5;273(13):1022-57897785
Cites: Psychosomatics. 1987 Sep;28(9):462-83432549
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Jan 26;263(4):527-322294324
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1994 Jan;151(1):10-78267106
Comment On: CMAJ. 1996 Jun 1;154(11):1657-658646653
PubMed ID
8646658 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of the debate on the general practice list system on the Eyr]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71778
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Dec 10;121(30):3509-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2001
Author
H. Sandvik
Author Affiliation
Institutt for samfunnsmedisinske fag Universitetet i Bergen Ulriksdal 8 c 5009 Bergen. hogne.sandvik@isf.uib.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Dec 10;121(30):3509-12
Date
Dec-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Computer Communication Networks - utilization
English Abstract
Family Practice - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Physicians, Family - psychology
Physicians, Women - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The most heavily discussed subject on Eyr, the Norwegian mailing list for general practitioners, has been the introduction of a general practice list system (GPLS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: All messages in the GPLS debate were recorded from its start in August 1996 up until the GPLS was introduced nationwide in June 2001. RESULTS: During this period, 243 different persons posted 2,153 messages about the GPLS, 232 of the participants were physicians, 203 of them GPs. Mean age was 46 years; males were strongly overrepresented (87%). 80% of the participants posted ten or fewer messages, 10% posted 11-20 messages, and 10% posted more than 20 messages. GPs sent most of their messages in the evenings, academics and public health officers sent most of their messages during work hours. Mean length of the messages was 179 words, 72% were responses to earlier messages. Most of the messages were neutral regarding the GPLS, 207 (9.6%) were negative, and 181 (8.4%) positive. Academics, public health officers, and participants in a GPLS trial were heavily overrepresented with positive messages. INTERPRETATION: It is concluded that this debate has been fairly balanced. Participation greatly exceeded what would have been possible in traditional media.
PubMed ID
11808009 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A study of the medical society. The response to questionnaire survey]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73131
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Oct 30;114(26):3052-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1994
Author
O G Aasland
E. Falkum
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Oct 30;114(26):3052-8
Date
Oct-30-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
English Abstract
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Norway - epidemiology
Physicians - psychology
Physicians, Women - psychology
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Workload
Abstract
In 1992, the Norwegian Medical Association started a comprehensive research programme on doctors' health and welfare. More than 30 studies are planned, based on a variety of data sets and methodologies. The core of the programme is the 1993 questionnaire survey. 9,266 active doctors received comprehensive questionnaires about their health, level of living and working conditions. The response rate was 72%. The response rate was higher for females than for males, 80% as against 69%. Of the categories of doctors, specialists in private practice showed the lowest response, 50%. In the main study a "question overlap" was applied, where each doctor received four out of 16 thematically different questionnaires. One questionnaire was common to all, the three others were randomly distributed among the recipients. The purpose of this design was to increase the potential for multivariate models in the analysis. We find the 72% response rate among the active doctors satisfactory, and feel confident that we have a reliable data base for further analyses.
PubMed ID
7974422 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Apr 30;113(11):1374-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-1993

[Attitude of Danish physicians to the health care services]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73396
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Jan 25;155(4):223-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-25-1993
Author
U K Andreassen
E. Hein
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Jan 25;155(4):223-6
Date
Jan-25-1993
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Health Services - standards
Humans
Male
Physicians - psychology
Physicians, Women - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In recent years, Danish society has focused on the service and the information available for patients in health care. A test sample out of 1,000 members of the Danish Medical Association selected at random revealed that the majority had positive attitudes to service and information in health care. The study also indicated that doctors do not consider that any particular dress code is particularly appropriate but consider that personal appearance and the way patients are addressed are individual matters. This individualistic attitude which is consistent with Mintzberg's sociological structural theory does not invariably seem appropriate.
PubMed ID
8430468 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Attitudes of Danish physicians to consumer charges in the health care system]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73397
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Jan 25;155(4):219-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-25-1993
Author
U K Andreassen
E. Hein
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Jan 25;155(4):219-23
Date
Jan-25-1993
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Denmark
English Abstract
Fees, Medical
Female
Humans
Male
Physicians - psychology
Physicians, Women - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Consumer charges in connection with visits to a doctor are common in a number of countries often used for comparison but are not employed in Denmark. The Danish Medical Association is opposed to consumer charges in health care and a test sample out of 1,000 of the Medical Association chosen at random showed a definite majority opposed to consumer charges. A minority of the profession was in favour of a nominal fee of less than 70 Danish crowns (approximately 7 pounds) for visits to a doctor while scarcely 4% considered that the fee should be more than 100 Danish crowns (approximately 10 pounds). 40% of the participants considered that the consumer charge would have to exceed 100 Danish crowns before it was of any consequences for the health of the patient. In addition, this study revealed that female doctors were more opposed to consumer charges than their male colleagues. At present, more women than men commence the medical curriculum in Denmark and it must therefore be anticipated that the percentage of women in the Danish Medical Association will soon exceed the present 30%. The resistance os the Danish Medical Association to consumer charges in health care will, therefore, probably be retained.
PubMed ID
8430467 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes of female nurses and female residents toward each other: a qualitative study in one U.S. teaching hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52022
Source
Acad Med. 2004 Apr;79(4):291-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Delese Wear
Cynthia Keck-McNulty
Author Affiliation
Behavioral Sciences, and Women and Medicine Program, Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine, 4209 Street Route 44, PO Box 95, Rootstown, OH 44272-0095, USA. dw@neoucom.edu
Source
Acad Med. 2004 Apr;79(4):291-301
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Australia
Communication
Female
Focus Groups
Gender Identity
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Norway
Nurses - psychology
Physician-Nurse Relations
Physicians, Women - psychology
Sexual Behavior
United States
Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe the attitudes of female nurses and female resident physicians toward each other in surgery, internal medicine, obstetrics-gynecology, and emergency medicine in one Midwest teaching hospital in the United States. METHOD: Using a qualitative methodology, 51 women were interviewed in 2002: 28 nurses and 23 residents. Questions were asked to determine if and how female nurses and female residents believed gender was a factor in their interprofessional relationships, how each described their relationship with the other, the kind of assistance female nurses provide to female residents, the kind of assistance sought by female residents, and the strengths and challenges of the female nurse-female resident relationship. Data were analyzed using NUD*IST software. RESULTS: Consistent with similar studies conducted in Norway and Australia, the results include the following: For female nurses, occupation is secondary to gender, which is to say that gender is the most important link between female nurses and female residents. For female residents, gender is secondary to occupation/occupational status. CONCLUSIONS: With the number of female residents increasing each year in hospitals, this relationship should be further examined so that dysfunctional communication patterns between the two groups can be challenged.
PubMed ID
15044160 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Attitudes of Norwegian general practitioners to prescription of estrogens 1990-92]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67739
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Aug 10;114(18):2095-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-1994
Author
S. Hunskår
Y S Hannestad
B. Backe
I. Matheson
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for allmennmedisin, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Aug 10;114(18):2095-8
Date
Aug-10-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Drug Utilization
English Abstract
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Menopause
Middle Aged
Norway
Physicians, Family - psychology
Physicians, Women - psychology
Prescriptions, Drug
Questionnaires
Abstract
In order to investigate the attitudes towards the prescription of hormone replacement therapy in menopausal and postmenopausal women, a questionnaire was mailed to two random samples of Norwegian general practitioners. The first sample (n = 340) was investigated in 1990, just before a national consensus conference on the use of oestrogens, the second (n = 240) one year after the conference. Nine short case stories were presented and the doctors indicated their attitudes to oestrogen prescribing in each case. Four items were systematically investigated: climacteric symptoms, smoking, risk of cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. In general, a restrained attitude towards the prescribing of oestrogen was found. Smoking and a family history of cardiovascular disease reduced the willingness to prescribe. The doctors had more patients on oestrogen treatment in 1992 than in 1990. In general, the answers indicate a more liberal attitude to replacement therapy in 1992, but the pattern of willingness to prescribe remained unchanged. Female physicians showed greater willingness to prescribe oestrogen than their male colleagues did, and were more updated on contraindications.
PubMed ID
7992263 View in PubMed
Less detail

151 records – page 1 of 16.