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1223 records – page 1 of 123.

[113 cases of cancer. A 10-year case material from general practice]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26767
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1984 May 10;104(13):886-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-1984
Author
M. Nylenna
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1984 May 10;104(13):886-90
Date
May-10-1984
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapy
Norway
Physicians, Family
Terminal Care
PubMed ID
6463977 View in PubMed
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[337 home calls during daytime from the emergency medical center in Oslo]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30514
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 5;124(3):354-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-5-2004
Author
Erling Iveland
Jørund Straand
Author Affiliation
Oslo kommunale legevakt, Storgata 40, 0182 Oslo. ovrefoss.14@c2i.net
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 5;124(3):354-7
Date
Feb-5-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
House Calls - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Physicians, Family
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few studies have addressed physicians' home calls in Norway. The aim of this study is to analyse home calls during daytime in Oslo in relation to patients (age, sex, district), diagnoses, request procedures, and clinical outcome. METHODS AND MATERIAL: General practitioners in the City of Oslo emergency medical centre recorded their home calls during three months using a standardised form. RESULTS: Calls to 337 patients (mean age 70, median 77 years; two thirds females; seven to children below two years of age) were recorded. The home calls were requested by relatives (36%), the patients themselves (32%), community care nurses (11%), and nursing homes (7%). The assessments made by the operators of the medical emergency telephone were generally correct. Physicians reported 77% full and 20% partial match between reported and found medical problem. The physicians assessed that 22% of the patients would have been able to go and see a doctor. 39% of all patients were admitted to hospital, 34 % needed ambulance transportation. The admitting GPs received hospital reports only after 27% of admissions. INTERPRETATION: Access to acute home calls by a physician during daytime is a necessary function in an urban public health service.
PubMed ID
14963510 View in PubMed
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[About physicians as characters in Norwegian literature]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11315
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Dec 10;115(30):3778-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1995
Author
E. Nørstebø
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Dec 10;115(30):3778-83
Date
Dec-10-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
Famous Persons
Female
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Medicine in Literature
Norway
Physicians, Family - history
Physicians, Women - history
Portraits
Abstract
A journey has been made through Norwegian literature of the last century for the purpose of presenting to the readers of this journal what is to be found of literature describing doctors. The purpose was also to find literary interpretations of the historical evolution of the doctor's role. A characteristic common to all the doctors in the study is that they all suffer from various personal problems such as neuroses, drug abuse, overindulgence in alcohol, family problems, loneliness, maltreatment of children, suicide or murder. A closer study of the description of six local doctors shows small changes in work structure and social relations during the century, but more popular behaviour is found in the portrayal of more modern characters. Good and rich portraits of doctors in Norwegian literature are rare. Those that are found have been created to describe personal or social problems rather than to tell especially what it is like to be a doctor.
PubMed ID
8539751 View in PubMed
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Acceptance of guideline recommendations and perceived implementation of coronary heart disease prevention among primary care physicians in five European countries: the Reassessing European Attitudes about Cardiovascular Treatment (REACT) survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47472
Source
Fam Pract. 2002 Dec;19(6):596-604
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
F D Richard Hobbs
Leif Erhardt
Author Affiliation
Division of Primary Care, Public and Occupational Health, Department of Primary Care and General Practice, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, UK. f.d.r.hobbs@bham.ac.uk
Source
Fam Pract. 2002 Dec;19(6):596-604
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
France
Germany
Great Britain
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - prevention & control
Interviews
Italy
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Physicians, Family - psychology
Primary Health Care
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although primary care is the major target of coronary heart disease (CHD) clinical recommendations, little is known of how community physicians view guidelines and their implementation. The REACT survey was designed to assess the views, and perceived implementation, of CHD and lipid treatment guidelines among primary care physicians. METHODS: Semi-structured validated telephone interviews were conducted, in the relevant native tongue, with 754 randomly selected primary care physicians (GPs and family doctors) in five European countries (France, Germany, Italy, Sweden and the UK). RESULTS: Most physicians (89%) agreed with the content of current guidelines and reported use of them (81%). However, only 18% of physicians believed that guidelines were being implemented to a major extent. Key barriers to greater implementation of guidelines were seen as lack of time (38% of all physicians), prescription costs (30%), and patient compliance (17%). Suggestions for ways to improve implementation centred on more education, both for physicians themselves (29%) and patients (25%); promoting, publicizing or increasing guideline availability (23%); simplifying the guidelines (17%); and making them clearer (12%). Physicians perceived diabetes to be the most important risk factor for CHD, followed by hypertension and raised LDL-C. Most physicians (92%) believe their patients do associate high cholesterol levels with CHD. After establishing that a patient is 'at risk' of CHD, physicians reported spending an average of 16.5 minutes discussing risk factors and lifestyle changes or treatment that is required. Factors preventing this included insufficient time (42%), having too many other patients to see (27%) and feeling that patients did not listen or understand anyway (21%). CONCLUSIONS: Primary care physicians need more information and support on the implementation of CHD and cholesterol guideline recommendations. This need is recognized by clinicians.
Notes
Comment In: Fam Pract. 2003 Jun;20(3):35012738707
PubMed ID
12429661 View in PubMed
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Access and perceived need for physical and occupational therapy in chronic arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144640
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2010;32(22):1827-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Debbie Ehrmann Feldman
Sasha Bernatsky
Jean Frédéric Lévesque
My Tram Van
Michelle Houde
Karine Toupin April
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal, Ecole de Réadaptation, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Pavillon 7077 du Parc, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C3J7. debbie.feldman@umontreal.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2010;32(22):1827-32
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - rehabilitation
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chronic Disease - rehabilitation
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational therapy
Odds Ratio
Physical Therapy Modalities
Physicians, Family
Quebec
Referral and Consultation
Rheumatology
Abstract
Physical and occupational therapy are beneficial for persons with chronic arthritis; however, access is problematic. The goal was to examine issues related to access to these services for patients with chronic arthritis.
We used two data sources: 1) questionnaires sent to a random sample of 600 family physicians and to all 85 rheumatologists in the province of Quebec; and 2) interviews of 211 patients with physician-confirmed chronic arthritis recruited from 34 primary care settings in Quebec.
Only 11.5% of family physicians and 31.7% of rheumatologists referred patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to rehabilitation, whereas 60.4% of family doctors referred patients with osteoarthritis. Only 26.1% of patients felt that they required rehabilitation and this was associated with lower self-efficacy (OR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.72, 0.99) and higher educational level (OR: 2.10, 95% CI: 1.01, 4.36).
Family physicians are less likely to refer patients with RA to therapy. Only about a quarter of patients with chronic arthritis treated in primary care perceived the need for these services. Efforts to improve arthritis care should address education of physicians and patients regarding the benefits of rehabilitation and there should be efforts to increase therapy resources in order to enhance access.
PubMed ID
20345251 View in PubMed
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[Access to general practitioners in a county in Troms]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70574
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Aug 25;125(16):2210-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-25-2005
Author
Anne Helen Hansen
Ivar J Aaraas
Jorun Støvne Pettersen
Gerd Ersdal
Author Affiliation
Tromsø kommune, Rådhuset, 9299 Tromsø. anne.helen.hansen@tromso.kommune.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Aug 25;125(16):2210-2
Date
Aug-25-2005
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Emergency Medical Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Family Practice - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Accessibility - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews
Male
Norway
Physicians, Family
Physicians, Women
Referral and Consultation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Rural Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Telephone
Urban Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In 2002 the Norwegian Board of Health made a survey of the accessibility of general practitioners in Troms county in North Norway. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a telephone interview one secretary in each surgery informed about telephone response time, planned time for telephone consultations, recorded numbers of urgent consultations, and waiting time to obtain a routine consultation. RESULTS: On average, the planned telephone time was two hours per week. Telephone time was in inverse proportion to the number of patients on the doctor's list. Rural doctors spent twice as much time as urban colleagues on the telephone with their patients. Doctors with lists between 500 and 1500 patients had a higher proportion of urgent consultations compared with doctors with shorter or longer lists. INTERPRETATION: Telephone response time below two minutes and waiting times for routine consultations below 20 days appear to be within acceptable norms. When patient lists are above 1500, doctors' capacity to offer telephone contact and emergency services to their patients seems reduced.
PubMed ID
16138139 View in PubMed
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Access to primary health care and health outcomes: the relationships between GP characteristics and mortality rates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82292
Source
J Health Econ. 2006 Nov;25(6):1139-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Aakvik Arild
Holmås Tor Helge
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, University of Bergen, Herman Fossg. 6, N-5007 Bergen, Norway. arild.aakvik@econ.uib.no
Source
J Health Econ. 2006 Nov;25(6):1139-53
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Empirical Research
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Mortality - trends
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physicians, Family
Primary Health Care
Abstract
This paper analyses the impact of economic conditions and access to primary health care on health outcomes in Norway. Total mortality rates, grouped into four causes of death, were used as proxies for health, and the number of general practitioners (GPs) at the municipality level was used as the proxy for access to primary health care. Dynamic panel data models that allow for time persistence in mortality rates, incorporate municipal fixed effects, and treat both the number and types of GPs in a district as endogenous were estimated using municipality data from 1986 to 2001. We reject the significant relationship between mortality and the number of GPs per capita found in most previous studies. However, there is a significant effect of the composition of GPs, where an increase in the number of contracted GPs reduces mortality rates when compared with GPs employed directly by the municipality.
PubMed ID
16675052 View in PubMed
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[Activities of the home nurse and cooperation with general practitioners].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245700
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1980 Jun 2;142(23):1531-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2-1980
Author
M. Kjøller
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1980 Jun 2;142(23):1531-6
Date
Jun-2-1980
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Nursing
Denmark
Home Care Services
Humans
Nurse-Patient Relations
Physicians, Family
Referral and Consultation
PubMed ID
7404756 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Acupuncture--a complementary treatment in general practice].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189625
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Apr 10;122(9):921-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2002
Author
Tori Aanjesen
Anita C Senstad
Nils Lystad
Kari J Kvaerner
Author Affiliation
Det medisinske fakultet Universitetet i Oslo 0316 Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Apr 10;122(9):921-3
Date
Apr-10-2002
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - utilization
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Headache - rehabilitation - therapy
Humans
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - rehabilitation - therapy
Musculoskeletal Diseases - rehabilitation - therapy
Norway
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Physicians, Family - education - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
Acupuncture is the complementary treatment most commonly used by general practitioners. This study describes the use of acupuncture among Norwegian general practitioners trained in acupuncture.
By telephone or mail, a questionnaire was presented to 212 general practitioners who had completed training in complementary acupuncture. They were asked to describe the use and effect of acupuncture and their attitude towards acupuncture.
Of the 111 physicians who replied (53%), 67 (60%) used acupuncture in their clinical practice. 78% had acupuncture courses of less than four weeks' duration only. 52% stated that acupuncture was the preferred treatment in more than 5% of their patients. About 70-80% used acupuncture as a supplement to conventional treatment. Acupuncture was commonly used in patients with musculoskeletal pain (93%), migraine (66%), and headache (63%), less often in patients with nausea, allergy, anxiety, sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal disorders. Improvement was reported in approximately three out of four patients. Lack of time was regarded as the major limitation to the use of acupuncture.
Many general practitioners trained in complementary acupuncture use acupuncture as an integrated part of their clinical practice.
PubMed ID
12082836 View in PubMed
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1223 records – page 1 of 123.