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[Ambulance transportation and prehospital treatment in connection with admission for suspected acute myocardial infarction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53765
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Mar 11;164(11):1493-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-2002
Author
Claus-Henrik Rasmussen
Anders P Munck
Torben H Haghfelt
Jakob Kragstrup
Author Affiliation
Syddansk Universiteit, Forskningsenheden for Almen Medicin i Odense, Odense Universitetshospital, Kardiologisk Forskningsenhed.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Mar 11;164(11):1493-6
Date
Mar-11-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulances - standards - utilization
Denmark
Emergency Medical Services - standards - utilization
English Abstract
Hospitals, University
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - drug therapy - therapy
Patient Admission
Physician's Practice Patterns
Quality of Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time and Motion Studies
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aim was to describe ambulance transportation and pre-hospital treatment in connection with admission for suspected acute myocardial infarction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For all patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome who were urgently admitted to the Cardiological Department, Odense University Hospital between 3 August 1998 and 6 December 1998, information about ambulance transportation and pre-hospital treatment was collected through interviews with the patients and study of ambulance records, admission notes, and hospital medical records. In addition, details of the regarding response times were obtained from Falck's emergency service and from nurses' papers. RESULTS: Altogether 279 patients (83%) were transported by ambulance. Half the ambulances arrived at the hospital after 34 minutes (range 11-140 minutes), but every third ambulance took more than 40 minutes to reach the hospital. The pre-hospital treatment of all the patients was: oxygen 69%, nitroglycerin sublingually 46%, nitrous oxide 2%, defibrillation 1.4%, acetylsalicylic acid 9%, morphine injection 8%, and ECG monitoring 57%. CONCLUSION: The study showed that there were quality problems, as every third ambulance took more than 40 minutes to reach the hospital. It also showed that acetylsalicylic acid and morphine were used only to a limited extent in a pre-hospital situation.
PubMed ID
11924473 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant drug use in general practice: inter-practice variation and association with practice characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45928
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2003 Jun;59(2):143-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Dorte Gilså Hansen
Jens Søndergaard
Werner Vach
Lars Freng Gram
Jens-Ulrik Rosholm
Jakob Kragstrup
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of General Practice, University of Southern Denmark, Winsløwparken 19, DK-5000, Odense C, Denmark. dgilsaa@health.sdu.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2003 Jun;59(2):143-9
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Antidepressive Agents - classification - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Physicians, Family - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The use of antidepressants (ADs) has escalated and prompted considerable debate. Many depressed patients go unrecognised or under-treated and the area of indication of the new ADs is widening. The aim of this study was to analyse (i). the variation in general practitioners' prescribing of ADs by comparing with prescribing of other drug groups and (ii). whether the general prescribing behaviour, practice activity and demography are associated with the AD prescribing. METHODS: Analysis of AD prescribing patterns among 174 general practices (93.5%) in the County of Funen, Denmark. Age- and sex-standardised 1-year incidences and prevalences of AD prescribing for patients listed were calculated using individual prescription data from Odense University Pharmacoepidemiologic Database. Data about health services and practice demography were obtained from the Health Insurance Register. The variation in AD 1-year prevalence was compared with other drug groups by a variation index (90%/10% percentile). Univariate linear regression analysis was used to examine associations between practice characteristics and prescribing. RESULTS: The 1-year prevalence of AD prescribing varied sixfold, no more than the prevalence of five other drug groups. Practices with high yearly: general prescribing prevalence, mean number of drugs per medicated patient, number of surgery consultations/100 patients and counsellings/100 surgery consultations showed the highest yearly prevalence of AD prescribing. Single-handed practices had higher AD prescribing rates than partnerships. The relative use of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors and other new ADs showed only little variation (10% and 90% percentiles as close as 66-86%), but practices with high 1-year prevalence and incidence most often chose the new ADs. CONCLUSION: Analysis of inter-practice variation showed no extraordinary quality problems with regard to AD prescribing, but does not exclude that there might be problems. The general prescribing pattern of the general practitioners seems essential to their attitude to AD prescribing. The relationship between counselling and prescribing was a feature specific to ADs and deserves further investigation. Quality indicators are needed to understand differences in AD prescribing, and studies based on prescription data have to be supplemented with individual clinical data.
PubMed ID
12721774 View in PubMed
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[Cardiovascular risk factors. Different evaluations by physicians and patients]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53634
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Nov 11;164(46):5382-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-11-2002
Author
Lars Bjerrum
Lena R V Hamm
Birgit Toft
Anders P Munck
Jakob Kragstrup
Author Affiliation
Syddansk Universitet, Audit Projekt Odense. lbjerrum@health.sdu.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Nov 11;164(46):5382-6
Date
Nov-11-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Denmark
English Abstract
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - prevention & control
Patients - psychology
Physicians, Family - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: General practitioners have an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular disorders, and it is a precondition for motivating patients to preventive issues that doctors are aware of the prevalent risk factors. The aim of the study was to analyse agreement between patients' and general practitioners' (GPs) perception of risk factors and overall risk of ischemic heart diseases (IHD). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The data consisted of records from an audit in May 1999. The GPs (n = 26) registered all enquiries from patients with IHD (n = 252) and a sample of healthy individuals (n = 1239). Both doctors and patients were asked to register the occurrence of cardiovascular risk factors (smoking, weight, stress, family history) and they were asked to evaluate the state of health and to estimate the overall risk of IHD. The agreement was evaluated by Kappa statistics. RESULTS: The level of agreement between GPs and patients varied from 70 to 97 per cent. Disagreement was observed most often for patients with IHD and patients listed with elderly GPs. (> 50 years). Disagreement was predominantly caused by a lower detection rate of the risk factors by the GPs. The patients' perception of overall risk of IHD was badly correlated to doctors' perception. Generally, patients perceived the overall risk of IHD lower than their doctors, and in more than half of the patients with a perception of low risk the GP estimated the risk as high. DISCUSSION: Patients and GPs have different perceptions of the risk of IHD. This may be due to the fact that GPs do not have all the information about their patients' lifestyle. It may also be due to different perception of the importance of specific risk factors and different reference frames for risk perception. GPs have an important role in communicating cardio-preventive issues and the meaning of risk factors. Interventions should be considered to improve risk communication in general practice.
PubMed ID
12469384 View in PubMed
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A complex intervention to enhance the involvement of general practitioners in cancer rehabilitation. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial and feasibility study of a multimodal intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137929
Source
Acta Oncol. 2011 Feb;50(2):299-306
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Dorte Gilså Hansen
Stinne Holm Bergholdt
Lise Holm
Jakob Kragstrup
Tina Bladt
Jens Søndergaard
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre of Cancer Rehabilitation, Odense C, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 2011 Feb;50(2):299-306
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Behavior Therapy - methods
Combined Modality Therapy - methods
Denmark
Feasibility Studies
Female
General Practice - methods
General practitioners
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - rehabilitation - therapy
Physician's Role
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Design
Abstract
The effect of interventions that support rehabilitation among cancer patients has to be tested before implementation.
A randomised controlled trial was conducted to test the hypothesis that a multimodal intervention may give the general practitioner (GP) an enhanced role and improve rehabilitation for cancer patients. The intervention included an interview about rehabilitation needs with a rehabilitation coordinator (RC), information from the hospital to the general practitioner about individual needs for rehabilitation and an incentive for the GP to contact the patient about rehabilitation. The objective of this first report from the study was to examine the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention.
Adult patients treated for incident cancer at Vejle Hospital, Denmark were included between May 12, 2008 and February 28, 2009. All general practices in Denmark were randomised. Patients were allocated to intervention or control (usual procedures) based on the randomisation status of their GP. The feasibility of the intervention was analysed with regard to recruitment of patients, acceptability by patients and GPs and the degree to which the planned contacts between patients, RCs and GPs were implemented. The primary outcome of the randomised controlled trial (RCT) will be health-related quality of life at six months (EORTC-30).
Following assessment of 1 896 cancer patients, 955 patients (50%) registered with 323 general practices were included. The interview was conducted at the hospital with 50% of the patients in the intervention group, 31% were contacted by phone. Patients valued the fact that the conversation was dedicated to needs beyond the medical treatment. The GPs were generally available for information by phone and positive towards having a central role in the cancer rehabilitation.
It was feasible to conduct a RCT to evaluate a complex intervention in the healthcare system. All elements of the intervention were acceptable and feasible and may be implemented in future practice if the effect is positive.
PubMed ID
21231791 View in PubMed
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Detailed postal feedback about prescribing to asthma patients combined with a guideline statement showed no impact: a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15376
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2002 May;58(2):127-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Jens Søndergaard
Morten Andersen
Kirstin Vach
Jakob Kragstrup
Malcolm Maclure
Lars F Gram
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense University, Odense, Denmark. j-soendergaard@cekfo.sdu.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2002 May;58(2):127-32
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Adult
Asthma - drug therapy
Child
Denmark
Family Practice
Feedback
Humans
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns
Postal Service
Practice Guidelines
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of postal feedback with clinically relevant data on general practitioners' prescribing compared with feedback with aggregate data on prescribing patterns of asthma drugs.METHODS: The study was a randomised, controlled trial. The general practitioners (GPs) in the County of Funen, Denmark (292 GPs representing 178 practices) were randomised to one of three groups receiving different forms of prescriber feedback. The first group received detailed and clinically relevant data on asthma drug prescribing patterns and a guideline statement. These data included tables with counts of asthma patients following classification of each individual's consumption of inhaled beta2-agonists and use of inhaled steroids. The second group received aggregate data on asthma drug prescribing patterns and a guideline statement, and the third group received feedback on an unrelated subject and served as control for the other groups. Each GP received prescriber feedback three times within a 6-month period. The last two letters with prescriber feedback had updated information with the purpose of showing changes in prescribing patterns. Effects were followed for a period of 1 year. The main outcome measures were change in fraction of asthmatics treated with inhaled steroids and incidence rate of treatment with inhaled steroids.RESULTS: The three groups had similar baseline characteristics. None of the two types of feedback on prescribing of asthma drugs had a statistically significant impact on GPs' prescribing patterns.CONCLUSION: Mailed prescriber feedback of detailed and clinically relevant data with a guideline statement, without revealing patient identities, has little or no impact on prescribing patterns.
PubMed ID
12012145 View in PubMed
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Does the early adopter of drugs exist? A population-based study of general practitioners' prescribing of new drugs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177780
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2004 Nov;60(9):667-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Torben Dybdahl
Morten Andersen
Jens Søndergaard
Jakob Kragstrup
Ivar Sønbø Kristiansen
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of General Practice, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Winsløwparken 19, 3rd, 5000, Odense C, Denmark. tdybdahl@health.sdu.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2004 Nov;60(9):667-72
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Decision Making
Denmark
Drug Therapy
Drug Utilization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Physicians, Family - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
To analyse associations between indicators for adoption of new drugs and to test the hypothesis that physicians' early adoption of new drugs is a personal trait independent of drug groups.
In a population-based cohort study using register data, we analysed the prescribing of new drugs by Danish general practitioners. Angiotensin-II antagonists, triptans, selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 antagonists and esomeprazol were used in the assessment. As indicators of new drug uptake, we used adoption time, cumulative incidence, preference proportion, incidence rate and prescription cost and volume. For each measure, we ranked the general practices. Ranks were pair-wise plotted, and Pearson's correlation coefficient ( r) was calculated. Next, we analysed the correlation between ranks across different drug classes.
For all indicators, the general practitioners' adoption of one group of drugs was poorly associated with adoption of others ( r
Notes
Erratum In: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2005 Mar;61(1):75
PubMed ID
15502995 View in PubMed
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Do general practitioner and patient agree about the risk factors for ischaemic heart disease?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49803
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2002 Mar;20(1):16-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Lars Bjerrum
Lena Hamm
Birgit Toft
Anders Munck
Jakob Kragstrup
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of General Practice, University of Southern Denmark, Odense. lbjerrum@health.sdu.dk
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2002 Mar;20(1):16-21
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Case-Control Studies
Communication
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Exercise
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Obesity - complications
Patient Education
Physician's Role
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians, Family - psychology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Stress, Psychological - complications
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To analyse agreement between patients' and GPs' perceptions of risk factors and overall risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). DESIGN: Cross-sectional study based on paired information from patients and GPs. SETTING: Twenty-six GPs in the County of Ringkøbing, Denmark, participating in a medical audit during 3 weeks in May 1999. SUBJECTS: 252 patients with IHD and 1239 without IHD. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: GPs and patients were asked about specific risk factors for IHD and their perception of overall risk. Their agreement was evaluated by Kappa statistics. RESULTS: Agreement between GPs and patients varied from 70% to 97%. Disagreement was observed most often for patients with IHD and patients listed with elderly GPs ( > 50 years). Generally, patients perceived the overall risk of IHD lower than their doctors, and for most patients with a perception of low risk the GP estimated the risk as high. CONCLUSIONS: Patients and GPs have different perceptions of the risk of [HD. This may be due to different perceptions of the importance of specific risk factors and different reference frames for risk perception. GPs have an important role in communicating the meaning of risk factors and interventions should be considered to improve risk communication in general practice.
PubMed ID
12086277 View in PubMed
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Do general practitioners know patients' preferences? An empirical study on the agency relationship at an aggregate level using a discrete choice experiment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124421
Source
Value Health. 2012 May;15(3):514-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Line Bjørnskov Pedersen
Trine Kjær
Jakob Kragstrup
Dorte Gyrd-Hansen
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of Health Economics, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense C, Denmark. lib@sam.sdu.dk
Source
Value Health. 2012 May;15(3):514-23
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Choice Behavior
Denmark
Female
General Practice - organization & administration
General practitioners
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Patient Preference
Physician-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
This study investigated whether general practitioners (GPs) know patients' preferences regarding a number of organizational characteristics in general practice (i.e., waiting time on the telephone, opening hours, waiting time to the appointment, distance to the general practice, waiting time in the waiting room, consultation time, and whether the GP or assisting personnel performs routine tasks) to examine whether there is a basis for improving the agency relationship at an aggregate level.
A total of 698 respondents from the Danish population and 969 GPs answered the questionnaire in May and September 2010.
In a discrete choice experiment, GPs and patients made both forced and unforced choices, allowing us to explore the congruence of preferences 1) when patients must choose a new GP and 2) when they can stay with their current GP.
Results show that in the forced choice, preferences are seen to differ. In the unforced choice also, preferences differ--mainly because GPs overestimate their own importance to the patients. Rank orders, however, are similar for both GPs and patients.
It is concluded that GPs do not have a precise knowledge of patients' preferences. However, in the unforced choice, GPs do know on which attributes to compete although they underestimate the necessity of competition. The overall conclusion is that there is room for improving the agency relationship in the organization of general practice.
PubMed ID
22583462 View in PubMed
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Early discontinuation of antidepressants in general practice: association with patient and prescriber characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45760
Source
Fam Pract. 2004 Dec;21(6):623-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Dorte Gilså Hansen
Werner Vach
Jens-Ulrik Rosholm
Jens Søndergaard
Lars F Gram
Jakob Kragstrup
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of General Practice, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. DGilsaa@health.sdu.dk
Source
Fam Pract. 2004 Dec;21(6):623-9
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents - classification - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic - therapeutic use
Denmark
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Family Practice - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Prescriptions, Drug
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Most antidepressant treatment is initiated and continued in general practice but, despite current guidelines, treatment duration is often short among patients with depression. Discontinuation may, however, be caused by a complexity of factors, but so far research has focused on drug effects, adverse effects and drug regimens. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to analyse whether early discontinuation of first-time antidepressant treatment in general practice may be predicted by (i) social position and psychiatric history of the patient; and (ii) demography, practice activity and the general prescribing behaviour of the GP. METHODS: Early discontinuation, i.e. that patients do not purchase antidepressants in the 6 months following first prescription, was analysed using established databases. Among patients presenting in 174 general practices in Funen County, Denmark, 4860 adult first-time users of antidepressants were identified (regardless of diagnosis). The inclusion period was January 1998-June 1999. RESULTS: One in three patients did not purchase antidepressants in the 6 months following first prescription, but rates were higher among those prescribed tricyclic compared with new generation antidepressants. Patients' age and sex did not have an influence, but early discontinuation was more frequent among patients of low socio-economic status and patients prescribed in practices characterized by high prescribing rates. No association with psychiatric history was observed. CONCLUSION: Early discontinuation is frequent in general practice, and patients of low social status are at greater risk. Adherence-promoting strategies should pay attention to the high prescribing doctors. Further studies may answer the question of whether the association between doctors' prescribing behaviour and early discontinuation is a feature specific to antidepressants or a more general phenomenon.
PubMed ID
15520034 View in PubMed
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General practitioners' adoption of new drugs and previous prescribing of drugs belonging to the same therapeutic class: a pharmacoepidemiological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76293
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2005 Nov;60(5):526-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Torben Dybdahl
Morten Andersen
Jakob Kragstrup
Ivar Sønbø Kristiansen
Jens Søndergaard
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of General Practice, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, J.B. Winsløws Vej. 9, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark.
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2005 Nov;60(5):526-33
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Ulcer Agents - therapeutic use
Attitude of Health Personnel
Consumer Satisfaction
Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Denmark
Diffusion of Innovation
Drug Utilization
Family Practice - trends
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Omeprazole - therapeutic use
Physician's Practice Patterns - trends
Receptors, Angiotensin - antagonists & inhibitors
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tryptamines - therapeutic use
Abstract
AIM: To test the hypothesis that general practitioners (GPs) with high prescribing levels of certain drugs will adopt new drugs belonging to the same therapeutic group faster than those with low prescribing levels. METHODS: The adoption of four new drugs: esomeprazol, selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, new triptans, and angiotensin-II receptor blockers were analysed using population-based prescription data. We used the preference proportion (prescriptions for new rather than older alternatives for the same indication) to measure GPs' adoption rate. Annual prescribing volume and prevalence were used to measure previous prescribing of older drug alternatives. We modelled the preference proportion using multiple linear regression analysis and the prescribing of older drugs as independent variables. We controlled for the GPs' general prescribing level and weighted for practice size. In the first three analyses, we dichotomized data using the median, lower and upper quartile as cut-off point. Next, we grouped data into quartiles and finally, we used continuous data. RESULTS: For esomeprazol and new triptans there was a higher preference for new drugs among "high prescribers", but only when this term was defined as the upper quarter and the upper half of previous prescribing levels, respectively (mean difference in preference proportion: 10.2% (99% confidence interval = 1.3%, 19.1%) and 8.2% (0.2%, 16.2%)). For the remaining two drug classes the associations were weak and almost all statistically nonsignificant. CONCLUSION: There is no consistent association between GPs' level of drug prescribing and their adoption of new drugs of the same therapeutic group.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2005 Nov;60(5):457-816236034
PubMed ID
16236043 View in PubMed
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