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1728 records – page 1 of 173.

Aboriginal health and family physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31534
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2002 Apr;48:680-1; author reply 681-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Jane McGillivray
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2002 Apr;48:680-1; author reply 681-2
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Welfare
Empathy
Family Practice - standards
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Inuits
Newfoundland
Physician-Patient Relations
Notes
Comment On: Can Fam Physician. 2001 Dec;47:2444-6, 2452-511785273
PubMed ID
12046355 View in PubMed
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[About the conditions of training and retraining of physicians and nurse personnel for the primary medical sanitary care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155048
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2008 May-Jun;(3):41-4
Publication Type
Article

Above all, do no harm: assessing the risk of an adverse reaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194729
Source
West J Med. 2001 May;174(5):325-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
K. Turcotte
P. Raina
V A Moyer
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology University of British Columbia, 4480 Oak St, L-408 Vancouver, BC, Canada V6H 1V4.
Source
West J Med. 2001 May;174(5):325-9
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Case-Control Studies
Causality
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine - adverse effects
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Physician-Patient Relations
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Vaccination - adverse effects
Notes
Cites: J Pediatr. 1983 Jan;102(1):14-86848712
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Mar 23-30;263(12):1641-52308203
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Jul 15;136(2):121-351415136
Cites: Lancet. 1998 Jan 31;351(9099):356-619652634
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1996 Feb 8;334(6):341-88538704
Cites: Dev Biol Stand. 1997;89:109-129272340
Cites: Vaccine. 1998 Jan-Feb;16(2-3):225-319607034
Cites: JAMA. 1994 Jan 5;271(1):37-417903109
PubMed ID
11342510 View in PubMed
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Abuse of residents: it's time to take action.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211834
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Jun 1;154(11):1705-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1996
Author
M F Myers
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Jun 1;154(11):1705-8
Date
Jun-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aggression
Canada
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians, Women - psychology
Prejudice
Sex Factors
Sexual Harassment
Abstract
The scientific study of the sexual dynamics that come into play during residency training seems to both fascinate and repel trainees and their supervisors. One of the more provocative and shameful dimensions of this area of inquiry, the abuse of residents, causes a good deal of distress. How do we respond to findings of significant psychological abuse, discrimination on the basis of sex or sexual orientation and sexual harassment in medical settings? How can we ignore over a decade of research? How can we not heed the experience of so many young physicians? Given the uncertain times in Canadian medicine and the insecurity in our professional and personal lives, we must work together to improve the culture of our teaching institutions and implement measures nationally and locally to close this dark chapter.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1984 Feb 10;251(6):739-426694276
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Apr 5;273(13):1056-77897792
Cites: JAMA. 1995 May 17;273(19):15537739086
Cites: JAMA. 1996 Feb 7;275(5):414-68569024
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Apr 5;273(13):1022-57897785
Cites: Psychosomatics. 1987 Sep;28(9):462-83432549
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Jan 26;263(4):527-322294324
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1994 Jan;151(1):10-78267106
Comment On: CMAJ. 1996 Jun 1;154(11):1657-658646653
PubMed ID
8646658 View in PubMed
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[A casual link between shaking hands and risk of infection].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180803
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(3):305-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Annakaisa Suominen
Pentti Huovinen
Author Affiliation
Mikrobiekologian ja tulehdustautien osasto PL 57, 20521 Turku. annakaisa.suominen@ktl.fi
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(3):305-10
Date
2004
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - transmission
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hand Disinfection
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional
Male
Office Visits
Physician-Patient Relations
Risk assessment
PubMed ID
15061008 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccination and sexual experience prior to disclosure to health care providers among men who have sex with men in Vancouver, Canada: implications for targeted vaccination programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122620
Source
Vaccine. 2012 Aug 24;30(39):5755-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-24-2012
Author
Claudia Rank
Mark Gilbert
Gina Ogilvie
Gayatri C Jayaraman
Rick Marchand
Terry Trussler
Robert S Hogg
Reka Gustafson
Tom Wong
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Vaccine. 2012 Aug 24;30(39):5755-60
Date
Aug-24-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Condylomata Acuminata - prevention & control
Disclosure
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Physician-Patient Relations
Vaccination - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Men who have sex with men (MSM) may benefit from human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine due to increased risk for HPV infection and related disease. We assessed HPV vaccine acceptability and sexual experience prior to disclosure to Health Care Providers (HCP) to understand implications of targeted vaccination strategies for MSM.
From July 2008 to February 2009, 1169 MSM aged =19 years were recruited at community venues in Vancouver. We assessed key variables from a self-administered questionnaire and independent predictors of HPV vaccine acceptability using multivariate logistic regression.
Of 1041 respondents, 697 (67.0%) were willing to receive HPV vaccine and 71.3% had heard of HPV. Significant multivariate predictors of higher vaccine acceptability were (adjusted odds ratio [95% CI]): previous diagnosis of genital warts (1.7 [1.1, 2.6]), disclosure of sexual behavior to HCP (1.6 [1.1, 2.3]), annual income at least $20,000 (1.5 [1.1, 2.1]), previous hepatitis A or B vaccination (1.4 [1.0, 2.0]), and no recent recreational drug use (1.4 [1.0, 2.0]). Most MSM (78.7%) had disclosed sexual behavior to HCP and median time from first sexual contact with males to disclosure was 6.0 years (IQR 2-14 years); for men =26 years these were 72.0% and 3.0 years (IQR 1-8 years) respectively.
Willingness to receive HPV vaccine was substantial among MSM in Vancouver; however, acceptability varied by demographics, risk, and health history. HPV vaccine programs delivered by HCP would offer limited benefit given the duration of time from sexual debut to disclosure to HCP.
PubMed ID
22796376 View in PubMed
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Access, relevance, and control in the research process: lessons from Indian country.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3424
Source
J Aging Health. 2004 Nov;16(5 Suppl):58S-77S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Spero M Manson
Eva Garroutte
R Turner Goins
Patricia Nez Henderson
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Nighthorse Campbell Native Health Building, Mail Stop F800, P.O. Box 6508, Aurora, CO 80045-0508, USA. spero.manson@uchsc.edu
Source
J Aging Health. 2004 Nov;16(5 Suppl):58S-77S
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Communication
Culture
Ethics, Research
Humans
Indians, North American
Long-Term Care - utilization
Physician-Patient Relations
Research Design
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Smoking
United States
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To illustrate successful strategies in working with American Indian (AI) and Alaska Native (AN) communities in aging and health research by emphasizing access, local relevance, and decision-making processes. METHODS: Case examples of health studies involving older AIs (greater than or equal to 50 years) among Eastern Band Cherokee Indians, a federally recognized reservation; the Cherokee Nation, a rural, nonreservation, tribal jurisdictional service area; and Lakota tribal members living in Rapid City, South Dakota. RESULTS: Local review and decision making reflect the unique legal and historical factors underpinning AI sovereignty. Although specific approval procedures vary, there are common expectations across these communities that can be anticipated in conceptualizing, designing, and implementing health research among native elders. CONCLUSIONS: Most investigators are unprepared to address the demands of health research in AI communities. Community-based participatory research in this setting conflicts with investigators' desire for academic freedom and scientific independence. Successful collaboration promises to enhance research efficiencies and move findings more quickly to clinical practice.
PubMed ID
15448287 View in PubMed
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Access to abortion: what women want from abortion services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157583
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Apr;30(4):327-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Ellen R Wiebe
Supna Sandhu
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Apr;30(4):327-31
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Therapeutic
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Data Collection
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Physician-Patient Relations
Pregnancy
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
Whether Canadian physicians can refuse to refer women for abortion and whether private clinics can charge for abortions are matters of controversy. We sought to identify barriers to access for women seeking therapeutic abortion and to have them identify what they considered to be most important about access to abortion services.
Women presenting for abortion over a two-month period at two free-standing abortion clinics, one publicly funded and the other private, were invited to participate in the study. Phase I of the study involved administration of a questionnaire seeking information about demographics, perceived barriers to access to abortion, and what the women wanted from abortion services. Phase II involved semi-structured interviews of a convenience sample of women to record their responses to questions about access. Responses from Phase I questionnaires were compared between the two clinics, and qualitative analysis was performed on the interview responses.
Of 423 eligible women, 402 completed questionnaires, and of 45 women approached, 39 completed interviews satisfactorily. Women received information about abortion services from their physicians (60.0%), the Internet (14.8%), a telephone directory (7.8%), friends or family (5.3%), or other sources (12.3%). Many had negative experiences in gaining access. The most important issue regarding access was the long wait time; the second most important issue was difficulty in making appointments. In the private clinic, 85% of the women said they were willing to pay for shorter wait times, compared with 43.5% in the public clinic.
Physicians who failed to refer patients for abortion or provide information about obtaining an abortion caused distress and impeded access for a significant minority of women requesting an abortion. Management of abortion services should be prioritized to reflect what women want: particularly decreased wait times for abortion and greater ease and convenience in booking appointments. Since many women are willing to pay for services in order to have an abortion within one week, this option should be considered by policy makers.
PubMed ID
18430382 View in PubMed
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1728 records – page 1 of 173.