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The activities and responsibilities of the vice chair for education in U.S. and Canadian departments of medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123194
Source
Acad Med. 2012 Aug;87(8):1041-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Erica Brownfield
Benjamin Clyburn
Sally Santen
Gustavo Heudebert
Paul A Hemmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. ebrownf@emory.edu
Source
Acad Med. 2012 Aug;87(8):1041-5
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - organization & administration
Canada
Education, Medical
Faculty, Medical
Female
Humans
Job Description
Leadership
Male
Organizational Objectives
Physician Executives
Questionnaires
United States
Abstract
A profile of the activities and responsibilities of vice chairs for education is notably absent from the medical education literature. The authors sought to determine the demographics, roles and responsibilities, and major priorities and challenges faced by vice chairs for education.
In 2010, the authors sent a confidential, Web-based survey to all 82 identified department of medicine vice chairs for education in the United States and Canada. The authors inquired about demographics, roles, expectations of and for their position, opinions on the responsibilities outlined for their position, metrics used to evaluate their success, top priorities, and job descriptions. Analysis included creating descriptive statistics and categorizing the qualitative comments.
Fifty-nine vice chairs for education (72%) responded. At the time of appointment, only 6 (10%) were given a job description, and only 17 (28%) had a defined job description and metrics used to evaluate their success. Only 20 (33%) had any formal budget management training, and 23 (38%) controlled an education budget. Five themes emerged regarding the responsibilities and goals of the vice chair for education: oversee educational programs; possess educational expertise; promote educational scholarship; serve in leadership activities; and, disturbingly, respondents found expectations to be vague and ill defined.
Vice chairs for education are departmental leaders. The authors' findings and recommendations can serve as a beginning for defining educational directions and resources, building consensus, and designing an appropriate educational infrastructure for departments of medicine.
Notes
Comment In: Acad Med. 2012 Aug;87(8):999-100122827983
PubMed ID
22722351 View in PubMed
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An approach to the assessment of learning needs for physician-managers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235444
Source
J Health Adm Educ. 1986;4(4):629-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
T. Myers
P. Leatt
W. Bonus
Source
J Health Adm Educ. 1986;4(4):629-43
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection
Hospital Administration - education
Humans
Physician Executives
Psychiatry - education
Public Health - education
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
In recent years physicians have become increasingly involved in the decision-making and policy-making processes in hospitals and other health service organizations. Consequently, there is a growing awareness of the need for specialized education programs for physicians who have managerial responsibilities. While education programs in management for physicians have been available in Britain and the United States for a number of years, relatively few programs have existed in Canada. Typically, physicians who have assumed administrative positions either within the medical staff organization or within the hospital's management structure have received no formal training in management. This article examines reasons for the increased demand for management education for physicians in Canada, specific needs of physicians in the area of management education, and the assessment of needs for management education programs.
PubMed ID
10316142 View in PubMed
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[An evaluation of patient satisfaction surveys by heads of hospitals and departments].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141960
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 Jun 28;172(26):1972-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-28-2010
Author
Erik Riiskjaer
Jette Ammentorp
Poul-Erik Kofoed
Author Affiliation
Institut for Økonomi, Universitetsparken, Bygning 1322, 8000 Arhus C, Denmark. eriiskjaer@econ.au.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 Jun 28;172(26):1972-7
Date
Jun-28-2010
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Health Care Surveys - methods
Hospital Departments - standards
Humans
Inpatients
Leadership
Patient satisfaction
Physician Executives
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Questionnaires
Abstract
The point of departure is that patient satisfaction surveys should be designed and organized in a manner that furthers ownership and responsibility ensuring follow-up by those who are to employ the results. This study therefore evaluates the perceived usefulness of patient satisfaction surveys among heads of departments and heads of hospitals.
During the period from 1999 to 2006, the County of Aarhus performed four patient survey series. After each series, heads of department and heads of hospital were asked to fill out questionnaires to evaluate the entire system. A total of 200 questionnaires were sent and 173 were returned (86.5%) with 640 comments to the open-ended questions.
82.5% of the leaders evaluated the concept as "Outstanding" or "Good". Leaders from teaching hospitals and heads of hospital were more satisfied. The highest scores were given for the option of having the results reported at ward level and/or diagnostic groups, and the option of collecting comments from patients. 82.4% of the leaders reported that the surveys had resulted in concrete follow-up activities. The main criticism of the concept was its lack of detail.
Generic patient satisfaction surveys can gain acceptance from the involved leaders. In part, the acceptance of the users is based on their possibilities of making individual choices within the standardized questionnaires. It is recommended to involve users of patient satisfaction surveys in the design and evaluation of concepts in the future, including frontline staff.
PubMed ID
20654286 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2007 May 17;127(10):1398
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-2007
Author
Berg Eli
Kolloen Grethe
Author Affiliation
Senter for helsefremmende arbeid, Akershus universitetssykehus, 1478 Lørenskog. eli.berg@ahus.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2007 May 17;127(10):1398
Date
May-17-2007
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Clinical Competence
Hospitalists
Humans
Norway
Physician Executives
Retirement
Specialties, Medical - manpower
PubMed ID
17520000 View in PubMed
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[Arrangement in nursing home threatens nurses].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103170
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1990 Feb 7;90(6):15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-7-1990
Author
E. Grube
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1990 Feb 7;90(6):15
Date
Feb-7-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark
Humans
Nurses
Nursing Homes - organization & administration
Physician Executives
Physicians
PubMed ID
2343395 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the quality improvement of prehospital emergency care in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199971
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 1998 Dec;5(4):407-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
B O Suserud
K A Wallman-C:son
H. Haljamäe
Author Affiliation
University of Borås, School of Health Sciences, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 1998 Dec;5(4):407-14
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence - standards
Emergency Medical Services - standards
Emergency Medical Technicians - education - supply & distribution
Health Services Research
Humans
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - statistics & numerical data
Physician Executives
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Sweden
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
The optimal competence level of personnel involved in prehospital emergency care is a matter for discussion. In Sweden a national quality improvement process has been initiated including strict regulation of the authorization of ambulance personnel to administer drugs and increased involvement of registered nurses. The aim of the present study was to assess from a national survey the present status of the ongoing quality improvement process in prehospital emergency care in Sweden. A questionnaire, detailing organizational, staffing, competence and functional aspects, was sent to all medical directors of prehospital EMS. The response frequency was 87.5%. Variations in the local organization of the prehospital care were observed. Only a limited number (20%) of the districts organized the ambulance services according to the competence level of the personnel. It was found that the competence level of the personnel involved in prehospital emergency care had improved considerably compared with the situation 5 years ago. A majority of the ambulancemen had increased their competence level by completing nurse assistant training and more registered nurses had been employed. The changes in the competence level and organization of the ambulance services and prehospital emergency care were considered to have had moderate (38.5%) or great (51.9%) impact on the quality of the services during the past 5 years. The effect was reported by 53.2% of the directors to be objectively verified from review of ambulance records, regular proficiency tests, patient survival data (cardiopulmonary resuscitation), and analyses of computer-based records. It is concluded that the present study clearly shows that quality improvement process initiated by the Swedish authorities has resulted in a considerable improvement of prehospital emergency care in Sweden during the past few years.
PubMed ID
10607408 View in PubMed
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Barriers to patient care in southwestern Ontario rural emergency departments: physician perceptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123081
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2012;17(3):87-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Kyle William Carter
Kelsey Cassidy
Munsif Bhimani
Author Affiliation
Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, The University of Western Ontario, London Ont., Canada. kcarter2011@meds.uwo.ca
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2012;17(3):87-91
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Crowding
Data Collection
Emergency Service, Hospital - manpower
Health Services Accessibility
Hospitals, Rural - manpower
Humans
Ontario
Patient Care - standards
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
Physician Executives - psychology
Physicians - psychology
Waiting Lists
Abstract
We sought to determine the perceptions of physicians staffing rural emergency departments (EDs) in southwestern Ontario with respect to factors affecting patient care in the domains of physical resources, available support and education.
A confidential 30-item survey was distributed through ED chiefs to physicians working in rural EDs in southwestern Ontario. Using a 5-point Likert scale, physicians were asked to rate their perception of factors that affect patient care in their ED. Demographic and practice characteristics were collected to accurately represent the participating centres and physicians.
Twenty-seven of the 164 surveys distributed were completed (16% response rate). Responses were received from 13 (81.3%) of the 16 surveyed EDs. Most of the respondents (78%) held CCFP (Certificant of the College of Family Physicians) credentials, with no additional emergency medicine training. Crowding from inpatient boarding, and inadequate physician staffing or coverage in EDs were identified as having a negative impact on patient care. Information sharing within the hospital, access to emergent laboratory studies and physician access to medications in the ED were identified as having the greatest positive impact on patient care. Respondents viewed all questions in the domain of education as either positive or neutral.
Our survey results reveal that physicians practising emergency medicine in southwestern Ontario perceive crowding as the greatest barrier to providing patient care. Conversely, the survey identified that rural ED physicians perceive information sharing within the hospital, the availability of emergent laboratory studies and access to medications within the ED as having a strongly positive impact on patient care. Interestingly, our findings suggest that physicians in rural EDs view their access to education as adequate, as responses were either positive or neutral in regard to access to training and ability to maintain relevant skills.
PubMed ID
22735084 View in PubMed
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Barriers to providing palliative care in long-term care facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164918
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 Apr;52:472-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Kevin Brazil
Michel Bédard
Paul Krueger
Alan Taniguchi
Mary Lou Kelley
Carrie McAiney
Christopher Justice
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. brazilk@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 Apr;52:472-3
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Medical, Continuing - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Facility Environment - statistics & numerical data
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Manpower
Humans
Long-Term Care - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Male
Ontario
Palliative Care - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Physician Executives - statistics & numerical data
Principal Component Analysis
Professional Practice - statistics & numerical data
Residential Facilities - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To assess challenges in providing palliative care in long-term care (LTC) facilities from the perspective of medical directors.
Cross-sectional mailed survey. A questionnaire was developed, reviewed, pilot-tested, and sent to 450 medical directors representing 531 LTC facilities. Responses were rated on 2 different 5-point scales. Descriptive analyses were conducted on all responses.
All licensed LTC facilities in Ontario with designated medical directors.
Medical directors in the facilities.
Demographic and practice characteristics of physicians and facilities, importance of potential barriers to providing palliative care, strategies that could be helpful in providing palliative care, and the kind of training in palliative care respondents had received.
Two hundred seventy-five medical directors (61%) representing 302 LTC facilities (57%) responded to the survey. Potential barriers to providing palliative care were clustered into 3 groups: facility staff's capacity to provide palliative care, education and support, and the need for external resources. Two thirds of respondents (67.1%) reported that inadequate staffing in their facilities was an important barrier to providing palliative care. Other barriers included inadequate financial reimbursement from the Ontario Health Insurance Program (58.5%), the heavy time commitment required (47.3%), and the lack of equipment in facilities (42.5%). No statistically significant relationship was found between geographic location or profit status of facilities and barriers to providing palliative care. Strategies respondents would use to improve provision of palliative care included continuing medical education (80.0%), protocols for assessing and monitoring pain (77.7%), finding ways to increase financial reimbursement for managing palliative care residents (72.1%), providing educational material for facility staff (70.7%), and providing practice guidelines related to assessing and managing palliative care patients (67.8%).
Medical directors in our study reported that their LTC facilities were inadequately staffed and lacked equipment. The study also highlighted the specialized role of medical directors, who identified continuing medical education as a key strategy for improving provision of palliative care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17327890 View in PubMed
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Brief observation: a national study of burnout among internal medicine clerkship directors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152164
Source
Am J Med. 2009 Mar;122(3):310-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009

Burnout in chairs of academic departments of ophthalmology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160513
Source
Ophthalmology. 2007 Dec;114(12):2350-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Oscar A Cruz
Christopher J Pole
Scott M Thomas
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63104, USA. cruzoa@slu.edu
Source
Ophthalmology. 2007 Dec;114(12):2350-5
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - statistics & numerical data
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Interprofessional Relations
Job Description
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Ophthalmology - organization & administration
Physician Executives
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
To evaluate the incidence of burnout in chairs of academic departments of ophthalmology, identify stressors, and propose methods for reducing and preventing burnout in our academic leaders.
Cross-sectional study.
One-hundred thirty-one chairs of academic departments of ophthalmology in the United States and Canada.
Confidential surveys mailed to ophthalmology chairs.
Questionnaires assessed demographics, potential stressors, satisfaction with personal life, self-efficacy, burnout as measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS), and quality of life.
Questionnaires were returned from 101 chairs, a response rate of 77%. Each chair had served an average of 9.4 years. They worked an average of 62 hours each week, spending 41% on patient care, 36% on administrative duties, 13% on teaching, and 9% on research. There was no difference in hours worked each week in chairs who had served >10 years from those who had been chair
PubMed ID
17976728 View in PubMed
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99 records – page 1 of 10.