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16 records – page 1 of 2.

1991-1996: Alaska's progress towards the goals of Healthy People 2000

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88238
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 6(1)
Publication Type
Report
Date
Feb-1998
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 6(1)
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Behavioral risk factors
Cholesterol screening
Cigarette smoking
Diabetes
Fruit and vegetable consumption
Heart disease
Inflluenza amd pneumonia immunizations
Mammography and clinical breast exams
Overweight
Pap tests
Physical activity
Proctoscopic exams
Safety belt use
Abstract
The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services implemented the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 1990 incooperation with the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The system gathers information about the health-related lifestyle choices of Alaskan adults related to leading causes of death such as heart disease, cancer and injury. The program is part of an ongoing national data collection system. Results are analyzed each year to improve our understanding of Alaskanhealth habits and to measure progress toward national and state health objectives. This report summarizes survey findings from1991 to 1996 and compares the results to selected national health objectives presented in the Healthy People 2000 publication.
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1994 behavioral risk factor survey highlights

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88229
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 4(1)
Publication Type
Report
Date
May-1996
20%. Definition used for this survey: Body Mass Index (BMI): Females with body mass index (weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared (w/h **2)>=27.3 and males with body mass index >= 27.8. Physical Activity The health benefits of physical activity are significant and can help prevent
  1 document  
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 4(1)
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
122252
Keywords
Alcohol use
Behavioral risk factors
Breast cancer
Cervical cancer
Chronic Disease
Diabetes
Health care coverage
Health checkups
HIV/AIDS
Nutrition
Overweight
Physical activity
Premature death
Sedentary lifestyle
Tobacco use
Abstract
Behavior and lifestyle play an important part in determining ourhealth status and lifespan. Every day Alaskans make lifestyle choices that profoundly affect their health. Although heredity and environment play a part, the leading causes of death in Alaska (heart disease, cancer and unintentional injuries) are closely related to lifestyle factors. Lifestyle and behavioral factors that affect health include such things as diet, exercise, use of alcohol andtobacco, and preventive health practices. Many premature deathsand disabilities could be prevented through better control of thesebehavioral risk factors.
Documents
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2007 behavioral risk factor survey highlights

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88236
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Publication Type
Report
Date
2007
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arthritis
Asthma
Binge drinking
Cardiovascular disease
Chronic Disease
Diabetes
Health care coverage
Nutrition and physical activity
Overweight/Obese
Premature death
Quality of Life
Tobacco use
Abstract
Modification of risk behaviors that contribute to chronic disease,premature death and impaired quality of life is an important public health challenge. The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) collects information on risk factors, chronic disease prevalence and preventive practices that is essential for the development of chronic disease prevention and health promotion efforts aimed at modifying key risk factors. The Stateof Alaska began surveillance using the BRFSS in 1991 and has continued yearly since. The Alaska BRFSS is a collaborative project of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Alaska Division of Public Health.
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Active spirit, active history: A culture of sports, activity and well-being among BC First Nations

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100784
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2010
  1 website  
Author
First Nations Health Council
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Keywords
First Nations
Health
Physical activity
Recreation
Sports
Well-being
Abstract
The First Nations Health Council created this book to collect the stories from First Nations people who have triumphed, mentored, or lead in traditional and non-traditional sports, recreation, fitness, or physical activity. The stories are heartwarming and honest, and are told with pride and triumph. Being physically active brings success over so many challenges and each story is valuable for it reflects our nature to be strong, endure, and to respect others, ourselves and the land.
Online Resources
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Alaska EARTH : Education and Research Towards Health. Alaska EARTH Study Data Summary 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301063
Publication Type
Report
3 Who Participated? CHAPTER TWO 7 Traditional Practices CHAPTER THREE 11 Medical Conditions and Measurements CHAPTER FOUR 27 Cancer Screening CHAPTER FIVE 33 Dietary Intake CHAPTER SIX 49 Physical Activity CHAPTER SEVEN 57 Safety Behaviors and Practices CHAPTER EIGHT 65 Environmental
  1 document  

At risk: Alaska Native health. Results from the 1996 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96036
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998

A description of physical activity and body mass index in three Inuvialuit communities: Results from Healthy Foods North

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258220
Source
Page 154 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
A DESCRIPTION OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND BODY MASS INDEX IN THREE INUVIALUIT COMMUNITIES, RESULTS FROM HEAL THY FOODS NORTH 5. Reaburn, 5. Biggs, E. Erber, L. Beck, E. DeRoose, J. Gittelsohn, 5. Sharma Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON Objective: To describe
  1 document  
Author
Pedersen M
Flrischer I
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care in Nuuk
Source
Page 154 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adults
Arctic
Body mass index
Canada
Healthy Foods North
Inuvialuit
Physical activity
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral Presentations. Chapter 3. Chronic Diseases.
Documents
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Health risks in Alaska among adults - Alaska behavioral risk factor survey 1998 annual report

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87927
Source
State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Publication Type
Report
Date
Aug-2000
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Source
State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Alcohol use
Breast cancer
Cervical cancer
Diabetes
Family planning
Health risks
HIV/AIDS
Nutrition
Overweight
Physical activity
Secondhand smoke
Smokeless tobacco
Smoking
Online Resources
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Health risks in Alaska among Alaska Natives - Alaska behavioral risk factor survey 1991-1993

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88239
Source
Juneau : State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services. 54 pages.
Publication Type
Report
Date
Feb-1997
Screening .......................................................................................... A-18 Table 7- Inadequate Physical Activity .................................................................................... A-19 Table 8- Acute (Binge) Drinking
  1 document  
Author
Schumacher, Catherine.
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Alaska Area Native Health Service
Source
Juneau : State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services. 54 pages.
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
6751304
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Cancer
Cerebrovascular disease
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Diabetes
Health Care Access
Healthy People 2000
Heart disease
Homicide
Liver disease and cirrhosis
Overweight
Physical activity
Pneumonia and influenza
Preventive health care practices
Safety belt use
Suicide
Tobacco use
Unintentional injuries
Health Behavior
Eskimos
Aleuts
Health and hygiene
Statistics
Abstract
Behavioral risk factors are associated with the leading causes of death in the United States and Alaska. Surveillance of behavioral risk factors allows us to monitor trends in health-related behavior and to measure progress toward reaching state and national health objectives. In cooperation with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System was implemented in Alaska in 1990. This is the first report summarizing health risk behaviors for the Alaska Nativepopulation, based on the first three years of BRFSS data available in Alaska. Combined survey results from January 1991 to December of 1993 are presented. Of the total sample of 4,604 respondents, 927 are Alaska Native. These data represent Alaskan adults, aged18 and older with telephones. Prevalence estimates for the Alaska Native population are compared to the general population inAlaska.
Notes
ALASKA RA408.I49S38 1997
Documents
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Implementing a whole school physical activity and healthy eating model in rural and remote first nations schools: A process evaluation of action schools! BC.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101114
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1296
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Author
Naylor, P-J
Scott, J
Drummond, J
Bridgewater, L
McKay, HA
Panagiotopoulos, C
Author Affiliation
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. pjnaylor@uvic.ca
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1296
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aboriginal communities
BC
British Columbia
Canada
First Nations
Healthy eating
Physical activity
Risk factors
Rural and remote locations
Schools
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Aboriginal people who reside in rural and remote areas of Canada often have poorer health than other Canadians. For instance, the prevalence rate of type 2 diabetes is 3 to 5 times higher than for the general population. Chronic disease risk factors such as obesity are also more prevalent. Overweight and obesity have become major health challenges for all Canadian children, but for Aboriginal children, the numbers are 2 to 3 times higher. 'Action Schools! BC' (AS! BC) is a whole-school framework designed as a positive approach to addressing childhood inactivity and unhealthy eating patterns during the school day that was effective for children in a large urban center. The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility and implementation of AS! BC in 3 remote Aboriginal communities in northern British Columbia. METHODS: The AS! BC model provided tools for schools and teachers to create individualized 'action plans' to increase the opportunities for physical activity (PA) and healthy eating (HE) across 6 'action zones'. These zones included: (1) school environment; (2) scheduled physical education; (3) classroom action; (4) family and community; (5) extra-curricular; and (6) school spirit. Teachers (primarily generalists) were provided with the training and resources necessary to implement their action plan for their class. Schools had three visits from the AS! BC support team. Teachers received specialized training and support, a 'planning guide' and classroom-based resources. Gender- and skill-level-inclusive activities were prioritized. Although the model emphasized choice using a whole-school framework, 'classroom action' was a flagship component. Teachers were asked to provide students with a minimum of 15 additional minutes of PA each school day and at least one HE activity per month in the 'classroom action zone'. Information about implementation was gathered from weekly 'classroom logs' completed by teachers and focus groups with school staff. RESULTS: The logs showed that all 3 schools implemented physical activities (mean = 140 min/week, range = 7-360 min/week) and HE activities (mean = 2.3 times/week, range = 0-10 times/week) but this varied by school and teacher. Adherence to logging was low (34% of eligible weeks). Focus group data showed that the program was well received and that support from the AS! BC master trainer and support team was crucial to delivery of the program. Staff highlighted challenges (eg time, high staff turnover at the schools and lack of financial resources), but felt that with continued support and cultural adaptations they would continue to implement AS! BC in their schools. CONCLUSIONS: The evaluation demonstrated that AS! BC was appropriate and feasible for use in the First Nations schools in these rural and remote communities with some cultural adaptations and ongoing support. Rural and remote locations have very specific challenges that need to be considered in broader dissemination strategies.
PubMed ID
20476839 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.