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Accessing timely rehabilitation services for a global aging society? Exploring the realities within Canada's universal health care system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145394
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Jul;3(2):143-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Michel D Landry
Sudha Raman
Elham Al-Hamdan
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mike.landry@utoronto.ca
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Jul;3(2):143-50
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Objectives
Physical Therapy Modalities - organization & administration
Private Sector - organization & administration
Public Sector - organization & administration
Time Factors
World Health
Abstract
The proportion of older persons is increasing in developed and developing countries: this aging trend can be viewed as a two-edged sword. On the one hand, it represents remarkable successes regarding advances in health care; and on the other hand, it represents a considerable challenge for health systems to meet growing demand. A growing disequilibrium between supply and demand may be particularly challenging within publicly funding health systems that 'guarantee' services to eligible populations. Rehabilitation, including physical therapy, is a service that if provided in a timely manner, can maximize function and mobility for older persons, which may in turn optimize efficiency and effectiveness of overall health care systems. However, physical therapy services are not considered an insured service under the legislative framework of the Canadian health system, and as such, a complex public/private mix of funding and delivery has emerged. In this article, we explore the consequences of a public/private mix of physical therapy on timely access to services, and use the World Health Organization (WHO) health system performance framework to assess the extent to which the emerging system influences the goal of aggregated and equitable health. Overall, we argue that a shift to a public/private mix may not have positive influences at the population level, and that innovative approaches to deliver services would be desirable to strengthening rather than weaken the publicly funded system. We signal that strategies aimed at scaling up rehabilitation interventions are required in order to improve health outcomes in an evolving global aging society.
PubMed ID
20158495 View in PubMed
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Bringing the Life Needs Model to life: implementing a service delivery model for pediatric rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167710
Source
Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2006;26(1-2):43-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Gillian A King
Mary Ann Tucker
Patricia J Baldwin
John A LaPorta
Author Affiliation
Early Childhood, School Age and Adolescent Services Program, Thames Valley Children's Centre, London, ON, Canada. gilliank@tvcc.on.ca
Source
Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2006;26(1-2):43-70
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Developmental Disabilities - rehabilitation
Disabled Children - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Male
Models, organizational
Needs Assessment
Occupational Therapy - organization & administration
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Pediatrics - methods
Physical Therapy Modalities - organization & administration
Quality of Life
Research Design
Social Support
Abstract
This article describes the use and utility of the Life Needs Model of Pediatric Service Delivery at a regional children's rehabilitation center. The model is a transdisciplinary, evidence-based model that guides pediatric service delivery to meet the long-range goals of community participation and quality of life for children and youth with disabilities. The article describes the use of the model as a tool to assist with the development of organizational culture, strategic and operational planning, the development of therapists' expertise, and the development of community partnerships. The model also has influenced human resources practices, community relations activities, and research. The model provides needed direction to service planners about the types of services that are important to provide in a geographical region, and fills a gap in outlining the nature of services that can be encompassed in pediatric rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
16938825 View in PubMed
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Hospital care versus home care for rehabilitation after hip replacement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224640
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1992;8(1):93-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
G. Möller
I. Goldie
E. Jonsson
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Hospital/Institute.
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1992;8(1):93-101
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Hip Prosthesis - economics - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Home Care Services - economics - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Hospitals - utilization
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Physical Therapy Modalities - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Time and Motion Studies
Abstract
A pilot study was done to assess the feasibility of reducing the hospital stays of patients with total hip replacement (THR). The length of hospital stay for these patients depends largely on how rehabilitation, mostly physical therapy, is organized. This study shows that not more than a half hour per postoperative day was devoted to care services and rehabilitation activities. It is feasible and less expensive to reduce substantially hospital stay by planned physical therapy in the patient's home. These results have prompted a randomized controlled clinical trial to assess hospital versus home rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
1601598 View in PubMed
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A life needs model of pediatric service delivery: services to support community participation and quality of life for children and youth with disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188675
Source
Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2002;22(2):53-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Gillian King
Mary Ann Tucker
Patricia Baldwin
Karen Lowry
John LaPorta
Louisa Martens
Author Affiliation
School-Age and Adolescent Services, Thames Valley Children's Centre, 779 Base Line Road East, London, Ontario, Canada N6C 5Y6.
Source
Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2002;22(2):53-77
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Developmental Disabilities - rehabilitation
Disabled Children - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Male
Models, organizational
Needs Assessment
Occupational Therapy - organization & administration
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Pediatrics - methods
Physical Therapy Modalities - organization & administration
Quality of Life
Research Design
Social Support
Abstract
This article presents a life needs model of pediatric service delivery that is based on the values of the intrinsic worth, dignity, and strengths of individuals. This developmental, socio-ecological model outlines the major types of service delivery needs of children and youth with disabilities, their families, and their communities within three spheres of life (the personal, interpersonal, and external spheres). The model legitimizes the concept of need, emphasizes the values of family-centered services, and recognizes child and family strengths and capacities. We discuss the utility of this transdisciplinary model in guiding pediatric service delivery to meet the long-range goals of community participation and quality of life of children and youth with disabilities.
PubMed ID
12216367 View in PubMed
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[Methodological and organizational bases for the early rehabilitation of the patients under conditions of a multidisciplinary clinic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106624
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 2013 Jul-Aug;(4):4-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
K V Liadov
T V Shapovalenko
O V Romashin
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 2013 Jul-Aug;(4):4-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Physical Therapy Modalities - organization & administration - trends
Rehabilitation - methods - organization & administration - trends
Rehabilitation Centers
Russia
Abstract
The Federal Medical and Rehabilitation Center of the Russian Health Ministry Health is a unique therapeutic and prophylactic setting. Its unique character is attributable to the fact that it incorporates specialized clinical departments that provide high-tech medical care and the Center for Restorative Medicine and Rehabilitation. Collaboration of these units permits to initiate rehabilitative measures from the very first day of the patient's stay in the hospital with due regard for the nosological form of his (her) disease. The activities of the Center for Restorative Medicine and Rehabilitation are based on the application of up-to-date remediation technologies that ensure the long-term rehabilitative effect and allow the duration of hospital stay to be decreased. During many years of practical work, the Centre has developed the proper organizational structure and gained a vast experience of comprehensive early rehabilitation after the most common diseases that was summarized by its specialists in numerous publications and theses and was many times reported at various scientific forums in this country and abroad.
PubMed ID
24137926 View in PubMed
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Physiotherapeutic Rehabilitation Following Lumbar Total Disc Replacement: A Retrospective Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281987
Source
Physiother Res Int. 2016 Sep;21(3):155-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Adeline Green
Philippa Gilbert
Matthew Scott-Young
Allan Abbott
Source
Physiother Res Int. 2016 Sep;21(3):155-63
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Disability Evaluation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intervertebral Disc Degeneration - diagnosis - rehabilitation - surgery
Lumbar Vertebrae
Male
Pain Measurement
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Physical Therapy Modalities - organization & administration
Postoperative Care - methods
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Time Factors
Total Disc Replacement - methods - rehabilitation
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study sought to answer the following questions: What are the outcomes of physiotherapy post lumbar total disc replacement (LTDR) compared with patient self-mediated rehabilitation? Is a difference in outcomes related to the number of physiotherapy sessions?
This is a retrospective observational study of 600 patients post TDR. Patient outcomes for self-mediated rehabilitation (Group 1), 1-3 sessions of clinic-based physiotherapy (Group 2) and =4 sessions of clinic-based physiotherapy (Group 3) were analysed. Outcomes measures included the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMQ), Short Form-36 Physical (SF-36 PCS) and Mental Subscale Components (SF-36 MCS), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for back and leg pain intensity. Patient's pre-operative baseline measures and post-operative follow-up measures at 3, 6, 12 and 24?months post-operatively were analysed.
Oswestry Disability Index and RMQ had significantly lower scores in Group 3 compared with Group 1 at 3, 6, 12 and 24?months follow-up. Significantly lower scores for Group 2 compared with Group 1 were observed for the ODI at 3?months follow-up and for the RMQ at 3 and 6?months follow-up. Significantly lower scores were observed in Group 3 compared with Group 1 for VAS back pain at 3?months and VAS leg pain at 6?months follow-up. Significantly higher scores in Group 3 compared with Group 1 were also observed in the SF-36 PCS at 6, 12 and 24?months. Significantly higher scores in Group 2 compared with Group 1 were observed at 6?months follow up. These trends were also observed when investigating the percentage of patients with a greater 50% improvement in the outcome measure.
Physiotherapy post-LTDR produces statistically significant and possibly clinically important improvements in functional disability, pain and quality of life outcomes compared with self-mediated rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PubMed ID
25892105 View in PubMed
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Physiotherapy in Primary Care Triage - the effects on utilization of medical services at primary health care clinics by patients and sub-groups of patients with musculoskeletal disorders: a case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265086
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2015 Jan;31(1):45-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Lena Bornhöft
Maria E H Larsson
Jörgen Thorn
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2015 Jan;31(1):45-52
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care Facilities - organization & administration
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - diagnosis - rehabilitation
Odds Ratio
Organizational Innovation
Patient Outcome Assessment
Physical Therapy Modalities - organization & administration
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Professional Role
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Triage
Young Adult
Abstract
Primary Care Triage is a patient sorting system used in some primary health care clinics (PHCCs) in Sweden where patients with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are triaged directly to physiotherapists. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether sorting/triaging patients seeking a PHCC for MSD directly to physiotherapists affects their utilization of medical services at the clinic for the MSD and to determine whether the effects of the triaging system vary for different sub-groups of patients.
A retrospective case-control study design was used at two PHCCs. At the intervention clinic, 656 patients with MSD were initially triaged to physiotherapists. At the control clinic, 1673 patients were initially assessed by general practitioners (GPs). The main outcome measures were the number of patients continuing to visit GPs after the initial assessment, the number of patients receiving referrals to specialists/external examinations, doctors' notes for sick-leave or prescriptions for analgesics during one year, all for the original MSD.
Significantly fewer patients triaged to physiotherapists required multiple GP visits for the MSD or received MSD-related referrals to specialists/external examinations, sick-leave recommendations or prescriptions during the following year compared to the GP-assessed group. This applies to all sub-groups except for the group with lower extremity disorders, which did not reach significance for either multiple GP visits or sick-leave recommendations.
The reduced utilization of medical services by patients with MSD who were triaged to physiotherapists at a PHCC is likely due to altered management of MSD with initial assessment by physiotherapists.
PubMed ID
24988315 View in PubMed
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[The estimation of the microclimate in organizing climatotherapy at health resorts in the southern Far East].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223236
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1992 Sep-Dec;(5-6):67-8
Publication Type
Article

[The experience of realization of health resort rehabilitation programs for children under conditions of "The Central military health resort for children"].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262938
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2015 Feb;336(2):42-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
L A Buchko
E N Tkacheva
N V Érkenova
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2015 Feb;336(2):42-6
Date
Feb-2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Health Resorts
Humans
Military Medicine - methods - organization & administration - trends
Organizational Policy
Physical Therapy Modalities - organization & administration
Rehabilitation Centers - organization & administration - trends
Russia
Abstract
Health resort treatment is one of the stages of rehabilitation for children. The Central Military health resort for children is a dynamic diversified health resort for the treatment of children and adults, using its arsenal all available, at the resort natural factors. In the conditions of sanatorium for the treatment of children apply advanced medical technologies, the development of modern medical equipment.
PubMed ID
25920176 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.