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695 records – page 1 of 70.

A 12-year comparison of common therapeutic interventions in the burn unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153001
Source
J Burn Care Res. 2009 Mar-Apr;30(2):281-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Christopher Whitehead
Michael Serghiou
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Services, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Galveston, Texas, USA.
Source
J Burn Care Res. 2009 Mar-Apr;30(2):281-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Burn Units - statistics & numerical data
Burns - rehabilitation
Canada
Disability Evaluation
Humans
Physical Therapy Modalities
Posture
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Range of Motion, Articular
Skin Transplantation
Splints
United States
Abstract
Although most occupational and physical therapists in an acute burn care setting use similar therapy practices, the time frames at which these therapeutic interventions are carried out vary according to the burn centers' practices. The purpose of this survey was to investigate current trends in burn rehabilitation and compare the results with a similar survey performed in 1994. The survey was designed in a similar fashion to the 1994 survey to ascertain common trends in burn rehabilitation. The survey was sent to 100 randomly selected burn care facilities throughout the United States and Canada. Content included rehabilitation interventions, including evaluation, positioning, splinting, active range of motion, passive range of motion, ambulation, as well as the cross-training of therapists. Significant increases in the percentages of burn centers initiating common therapy practices were found. Positioning (41% increase), active range of motion (48% increase), passive range of motion (52% increase), and ambulation (29% increase) were all found to have increases in the number of burn centers employing these practices in the same time frame. Overall comparison from 1994 to 2006 shows that common therapy techniques are being initiated earlier in the patient's acute burn stay. These results are consistent with recent medical trends of earlier acute discharges and more focus on outpatient rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
19165113 View in PubMed
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A 13-year cohort study of musculoskeletal disorders treated in an autoplant, on-site physiotherapy clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160671
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2007 Dec;17(4):610-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Jackie Sadi
Joy C MacDermid
Bert Chesworth
Trevor Birmingham
Author Affiliation
School of Physical Therapy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada. jsadi2@uwo.ca
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2007 Dec;17(4):610-22
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Automobiles
Female
Humans
Industry
Male
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - therapy
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - therapy
Occupational Health
Ontario - epidemiology
Physical Therapy Modalities
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe the rate and distribution of treatment visits provided in an on-site, automotive plant, physiotherapy clinic over a 13-year period.
A retrospective cohort study was conducted using data collected at an on-site physiotherapy clinic (1990-2002, 65,977 visits; n = 2,636 workers).
The average age of workers was 43 +/- 9 years; most remained at work (85%) when treated. Disorders most commonly affected the shoulder, lumbar, and cervical regions; the median number of visits for these was 7, 6, and 5, respectively. Elbow disorders occurred commonly only for work-related complaints and required a median of eight visits. Rate of utilization was higher for women, with 47% of the plant's female workers attending physiotherapy in 1 year. Women had higher rates of cervical spine (12 vs. 22%) and wrist (5 vs. 10%) disorders. The two most common causes of injury reported by workers with an industrial injury were "frank injury arising out of normal employment" (51%) and "gradual onset/no frank injury" (37%). The diagnosis most often reported by the physiotherapist after initial assessment was "strain" which was similar for both industrial (43%) and non-industrial (49%) injuries. The six main departments in this automotive plant account for 93% of all industrial injuries reported. Final Assembly accounted for the largest number and highest rate of injury, although shift variability was noted in utilization rates (13 vs. 26%), despite the same tasks, shift schedules, and demographics. Although there was no control group, the number of visits to discharge was lower than reported in the literature for off-site physical therapy; there was a large reduction in claims (441-275) following introduction of the clinic and reduced duration/costs of lost time were identified by the employer as a rationale to continue and enhance the service over time.
On-site physiotherapy services can provide early, cost-effective management of WRMSD in the automotive sector. Service utilization reflects the influence of gender, job task, and shift-dynamics on rates and location of WRMSD.
PubMed ID
17955347 View in PubMed
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[Accelerated course in hip arthroplasty]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61715
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Dec 3;163(49):6912-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-3-2001
Author
S. Rasmussen
M U Kramhøft
K P Sperling
J H Pedersen
I B Falck
E M Pedersen
H. Kehlet
Author Affiliation
Privathospitalet Hamlet, Frederiksberg. sten.rasmussen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Dec 3;163(49):6912-6
Date
Dec-3-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - nursing - rehabilitation
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Patient Discharge
Physical Therapy Modalities
Postoperative Care - methods
Preoperative Care - methods
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function
Rehabilitation Nursing - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to assess the results of a well-defined rehabilitation programme after hip arthroplasty. METHODS: The effects of a revised, optimised, perioperative care programme with continuous epidural analgesia, oral nutrition, and physiotherapy were assessed in 60 patients before intervention and 60 patients after intervention. RESULTS: The hospital stay was reduced from nine to six days (p
PubMed ID
11766505 View in PubMed
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Access and perceived need for physical and occupational therapy in chronic arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144640
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2010;32(22):1827-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Debbie Ehrmann Feldman
Sasha Bernatsky
Jean Frédéric Lévesque
My Tram Van
Michelle Houde
Karine Toupin April
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal, Ecole de Réadaptation, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Pavillon 7077 du Parc, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C3J7. debbie.feldman@umontreal.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2010;32(22):1827-32
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - rehabilitation
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chronic Disease - rehabilitation
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational therapy
Odds Ratio
Physical Therapy Modalities
Physicians, Family
Quebec
Referral and Consultation
Rheumatology
Abstract
Physical and occupational therapy are beneficial for persons with chronic arthritis; however, access is problematic. The goal was to examine issues related to access to these services for patients with chronic arthritis.
We used two data sources: 1) questionnaires sent to a random sample of 600 family physicians and to all 85 rheumatologists in the province of Quebec; and 2) interviews of 211 patients with physician-confirmed chronic arthritis recruited from 34 primary care settings in Quebec.
Only 11.5% of family physicians and 31.7% of rheumatologists referred patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to rehabilitation, whereas 60.4% of family doctors referred patients with osteoarthritis. Only 26.1% of patients felt that they required rehabilitation and this was associated with lower self-efficacy (OR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.72, 0.99) and higher educational level (OR: 2.10, 95% CI: 1.01, 4.36).
Family physicians are less likely to refer patients with RA to therapy. Only about a quarter of patients with chronic arthritis treated in primary care perceived the need for these services. Efforts to improve arthritis care should address education of physicians and patients regarding the benefits of rehabilitation and there should be efforts to increase therapy resources in order to enhance access.
PubMed ID
20345251 View in PubMed
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Accessing timely rehabilitation services for a global aging society? Exploring the realities within Canada's universal health care system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145394
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Jul;3(2):143-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Michel D Landry
Sudha Raman
Elham Al-Hamdan
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mike.landry@utoronto.ca
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Jul;3(2):143-50
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Objectives
Physical Therapy Modalities - organization & administration
Private Sector - organization & administration
Public Sector - organization & administration
Time Factors
World Health
Abstract
The proportion of older persons is increasing in developed and developing countries: this aging trend can be viewed as a two-edged sword. On the one hand, it represents remarkable successes regarding advances in health care; and on the other hand, it represents a considerable challenge for health systems to meet growing demand. A growing disequilibrium between supply and demand may be particularly challenging within publicly funding health systems that 'guarantee' services to eligible populations. Rehabilitation, including physical therapy, is a service that if provided in a timely manner, can maximize function and mobility for older persons, which may in turn optimize efficiency and effectiveness of overall health care systems. However, physical therapy services are not considered an insured service under the legislative framework of the Canadian health system, and as such, a complex public/private mix of funding and delivery has emerged. In this article, we explore the consequences of a public/private mix of physical therapy on timely access to services, and use the World Health Organization (WHO) health system performance framework to assess the extent to which the emerging system influences the goal of aggregated and equitable health. Overall, we argue that a shift to a public/private mix may not have positive influences at the population level, and that innovative approaches to deliver services would be desirable to strengthening rather than weaken the publicly funded system. We signal that strategies aimed at scaling up rehabilitation interventions are required in order to improve health outcomes in an evolving global aging society.
PubMed ID
20158495 View in PubMed
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Accuracy and reliability of 'specialized' physical therapists in auscultating tape-recorded lung sounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219667
Source
Physiother Can. 1993;45(1):21-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
D. Brooks
L. Wilson
C. Kelsey
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Toronto.
Source
Physiother Can. 1993;45(1):21-4
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Auscultation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Clinical Competence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Diagnostic Errors
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Ontario
Physical Therapy Modalities - classification - standards - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Respiratory Function Tests - standards - statistics & numerical data
Tape Recording
Abstract
This study investigated the accuracy and inter-rater reliability of 'specialized' physical therapists in the auscultation of tape-recorded lung sounds. In addition, a correlation was investigated between accuracy of interpretation and the number of years of specialization in the field of cardiorespiratory physical therapy. This research follows an earlier study which investigated the accuracy and inter-rater reliability of auscultating tape-recorded lung sounds in a 'non-specialized' cohort of physical therapists. The subjects were 26 'specialized' cardiorespiratory physical therapists working in acute urban teaching hospitals. These individuals were required to have been practising currently and exclusively for at least one year in the area of cardiorespiratory physical therapy. Participants listened with a stethoscope to five different sounds and identified them from a standardized list of terms. One of three tapes with the same lung sounds in different order was randomly selected for each physical therapist. The percentage of correct answers for all subjects was calculated. An accurate response in the detection of lung sounds was arbitrarily defined as a percentage of correct answers of 70% or greater. The difference between the pooled correct response rate of 50% and the arbitrarily set value of 70% was statistically significant (z = 2.23, p
PubMed ID
10124337 View in PubMed
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[Acid-base equilibrium in bronchial asthma during treatment at the Kislovodsk health resort].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250135
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1977 Mar-Apr;(2):55-8
Publication Type
Article

Actual vs best practice for families post-stroke according to three rehabilitation disciplines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161684
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2007 Sep;39(7):513-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Annie Rochette
Nicol Korner-Bitensky
Johanne Desrosiers
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Quebec, Canada. annie.rochette@umontreal.ca
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2007 Sep;39(7):513-9
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Community Health Services
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physical Therapy Modalities
Questionnaires
Speech Therapy
Spouses - psychology
Stroke - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
To investigate occupational therapists', physiotherapists' and speech language pathologists' family-related rehabilitation practice post-stroke and its association with clinician and environmental variables.
A Canadian cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted on 1755 clinicians. Three case studies describing typical patients after stroke receiving acute care, in-patient rehabilitation, or community rehabilitation, and including specific descriptors regarding family stress and concern, were used to elicit information on patient management.
One-third of the sample identified a family-related problem and offered a related intervention, but only 12/1755 clinicians indicated that they would typically use a standardized assessment of family functioning. Working in the community out-patient setting was associated (OR 9.16), whereas working in a rehabilitation in-patient setting was negatively associated (OR 0.58) with being a problem identifier, the reference group being acute care. Being a PT (OR 0.53) or an SLP (OR 0.49) vs an OT was negatively associated with being a problem identifier, whereas being older (OR 1.02 ) or working in Ontario (OR 1.58) was associated with being a problem identifier. To work in a community out-patient setting (OR 2.43), being older clinicians (OR 1.02) or not perceiving their work environment being supportive of an on-going professional learning (OR 1.72) was associated with being an intervention user,whereas being a PT (OR 0.50) was negatively associated with being a user.
For these 3 disciplines, the prevalence of a family-related focus is low post-stroke. Given the increasing evidence regarding the effectiveness of family-related interventions on stroke outcomes, it is imperative that best practice is implemented.
PubMed ID
17724549 View in PubMed
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Actual vs. best practices for young children with cerebral palsy: a survey of paediatric occupational therapists and physical therapists in Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160768
Source
Dev Neurorehabil. 2008 Jan-Mar;11(1):60-80
Publication Type
Article
Author
M N Saleh
N. Korner-Bitensky
L. Snider
F. Malouin
B. Mazer
E. Kennedy
M A Roy
Author Affiliation
School of Physical & Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University and Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire en réadaptation du Montréal métropolitain, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. maysoun.saleh@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Dev Neurorehabil. 2008 Jan-Mar;11(1):60-80
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Cerebral Palsy - rehabilitation
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Interviews as Topic
Male
Occupational Therapy - standards
Pediatrics - standards
Physical Therapy Modalities - standards
Quality of Health Care
Quebec
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Cerebral palsy (CP) constitutes a substantial portion of paediatric rehabilitation, yet little is known regarding actual occupational therapy (OT) and physical therapy (PT) practices. This study describes OT and PT practices for young children with CP in Quebec, Canada.
This was a cross-sectional survey. All eligible, consenting paediatric occupational therapists (OTs) and physical therapists (PTs) were interviewed using a structured telephone interview based on vignettes of two typical children with CP at two age points--18 months and 4 years. Reported practices were grouped according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).
91.9% of PTs (n=62; 83.8% participation rate) and 67.1% of OTs (n=85; 91.4% participation rate) reported using at least one standardized paediatric assessment. OT and PT interventions focused primarily on impairments and primary function (such as gait function and activities of daily living). Both professions gave little attention to interventions related to play and recreation/leisure. Clinicians reported the need for more training and education specific to CP and to the use of research findings in clinical practice.
Wide variations and gaps were identified in clinicians' responses suggesting the need for a basic standard of OT and PT management as well as strategies to encourage knowledge dissemination regarding current best practice.
PubMed ID
17943507 View in PubMed
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695 records – page 1 of 70.