Skip header and navigation

Refine By

36 records – page 1 of 4.

A 4-year, cluster-randomized, controlled childhood obesity prevention study: STOPP.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99038
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Apr;33(4):408-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
C. Marcus
G. Nyberg
A. Nordenfelt
M. Karpmyr
J. Kowalski
U. Ekelund
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, National Childhood Obesity Centre, Stockholm, Sweden. claude.marcus@ki.se
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Apr;33(4):408-17
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Child
Cluster analysis
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Overweight - epidemiology - prevention & control
Parents - psychology
Physical Fitness - psychology
Prevalence
Risk Reduction Behavior
School Health Services
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of a school-based intervention programme to reduce the prevalence of overweight in 6 to 10-year-old children. DESIGN: Cluster-randomized, controlled study. SUBJECTS: A total of 3135 boys and girls in grades 1-4 were included in the study. METHODS: Ten schools were selected in Stockholm county area and randomized to intervention (n=5) and control (n=5) schools. Low-fat dairy products and whole-grain bread were promoted and all sweets and sweetened drinks were eliminated in intervention schools. Physical activity (PA) was aimed to increase by 30 min day(-1) during school time and sedentary behaviour restricted during after school care time. PA was measured by accelerometry. Eating habits at home were assessed by parental report. Eating disorders were evaluated by self-report. RESULTS: The prevalence of overweight and obesity decreased by 3.2% (from 20.3 to 17.1) in intervention schools compared with an increase of 2.8% (from 16.1 to 18.9) in control schools (P
PubMed ID
19290010 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1997;23 Suppl 1:27-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
J. Seitsamo
M. Klockars
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1997;23 Suppl 1:27-35
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging - psychology
Attitude to Health
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Fitness - psychology
Retirement - psychology
Sick Role
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
The study explored changes in the health of aging workers from 1981 to 1992.
Municipal workers [age 55 to 69 (mean 61.6) years in 1992] who filled out questionnaires in both 1981 and 1992 (N = 4534) were studied. The changes in disease prevalence and perceived health were tested with Pearson's chi-square independence test. Improvement and decline in perceived health were analyzed by logistic regression models.
In 1992, significantly more diseases were reported than in 1981; the musculoskeletal disease rate rose from 38% in 1981 to 53% in 1992 for the women and from 35% to 49% for the men and the cardiovascular disease rate rose from 15% in 1981 to 28% in 1992 for the women and from 19% to 37% for the men. The age differences diminished during the follow-up. Self-assessed health improved in all the age groups among both those still working in 1992 and those retired. The association between illnesses and perceived health changed during the follow-up, 11% of those with no diseases experiencing their health as good in 1981 and over 40% in 1992. The most important factors explaining the improvement appeared to be a low number of physical illnesses and the absence of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal disease. Nonphysical work, frequent physical exercise, and satisfaction with life situation were also significant contributors to good perceived health.
The improvement in perceived health during the follow-up may mean that older people have lower criteria for good perceived health than younger people do. The associations between self-assessed health and the presence of disease need further study.
PubMed ID
9247993 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aging, work, life-style and work ability among Finnish municipal workers in 1981-1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210013
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1997;23 Suppl 1:58-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
K. Tuomi
J. Ilmarinen
R. Martikainen
L. Aalto
M. Klockars
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1997;23 Suppl 1:58-65
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Individuality
Job Satisfaction
Life Style
Local Government
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Fitness - psychology
Social Environment
Work Capacity Evaluation
Workload - psychology
Abstract
This study was designed to explain changes in work ability through occupational and life-style factors.
Work ability was measured by an index describing workers' health resources in regard to their work demands. The work factors mainly included physical and mental demands, social organization and the physical work environment. The life-style factors covered smoking, alcohol consumption, and leisure-time physical exercise. The first questionnaire study was done in 1981 and it was repeated in 1992. The subjects (N = 818) were workers in the 44- to 51-year-old age group in the beginning of the study who were active during the entire follow-up. The improvement and, correspondingly, the decline in work ability were analyzed by logistic regression models.
Both the improvement and the decline in work ability were associated more strongly with changes in work and life-style during the follow-up than with their initial variation. The model for improved work ability included improvement of the supervisor's attitude, decreased repetitive movements at work, and increased amount of vigorous leisure-time physical exercise. Deterioration in work ability was explained by a model which included a decrease in recognition and esteem at work, decrease in workroom conditions, increase in standing at work, and decrease in vigorous leisure-time physical exercise.
Social relations at work can promote or impair the work ability of elderly workers. Although the work ability of elderly workers generally declined with aging, both older and younger workers were also able to improve their work ability.
PubMed ID
9247996 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness and self-rated health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106838
Source
Prev Med. 2013 Dec;57(6):900-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Louise Eriksen
Tine Curtis
Morten Grønbæk
Jørn W Helge
Janne S Tolstrup
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Øster Farimagsgade 5A, 1353 Copenhagen K, Denmark. Electronic address: lue@niph.dk.
Source
Prev Med. 2013 Dec;57(6):900-2
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Exercise Test - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Motor Activity
Physical Fitness - psychology
Questionnaires
Self Report
Abstract
To investigate the joint association between self-reported physical activity as well as cardiorespiratory fitness and self-rated health among healthy women and men.
Data from 10,416 participants in The Danish Health Examination Survey 2007-2008 which took part in 13 Danish municipalities were analyzed. Leisure time physical activity level and self-rated health were based on self-reported questionnaire data. Optimal self-rated health was defined as "very good" or "good" self-rated health. Cardiorespiratory fitness (mL O2?min(-1)?kg(-1)) was estimated from maximal power output in a maximal cycle exercise test.
A strong dose-response relation between cardiorespiratory fitness and self-rated health as well as between physical activity level and self-rated health among both women and men was found. Within categories of physical activity, odds ratios for optimal self-rated health increased with increasing categories of cardiorespiratory fitness, and vice versa. Hence, participants who were moderately/vigorously physically active and had a high cardiorespiratory fitness had the highest odds ratio for optimal self-rated health compared with sedentary participants with low cardiorespiratory fitness (odds ratio=12.2, 95% confidence interval: 9.3-16.1).
Although reluctant to conclude on causality, this study suggests that an active lifestyle as well as good cardiorespiratory fitness probably increase self-rated health.
PubMed ID
24099878 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between physical fitness and depressive symptoms among young adults: results of the Northern Finland 1966 birth cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113398
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:535
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Kadri Suija
Markku Timonen
Maarit Suviola
Jari Jokelainen
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Tuija Tammelin
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, Box 5000, FIN 90014, Oulu, Finland. kadri.suija@ut.ee
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:535
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Exercise - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Male
Physical Fitness - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The effect of physical activity on mental health has been the subject of research for several decades. However, there is a lack of studies investigating the association between physical fitness, including both cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness and depressive symptoms among general population. The aim of this study was to determine the association between physical fitness and depressive symptoms among young adults.
The study population consists of 5497 males and females, members of the Northern Finland birth cohort of 1966, who at age 31 completed fitness tests and filled in a questionnaire including questions about depressive symptoms (Hopkins' Symptom Checklist-25) and physical activity. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured by a 4-min step test and muscular fitness by tests of maximal isometric handgrip and isometric trunk extension. The odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for having depressive symptoms were calculated for quintiles groups of physical fitness using the third, median quintile as reference group, and the results were adjusted for potential confounding variables.
Depressive symptoms were most common among males and females in the lowest quintile group of trunk extension test (OR 1.58 and 95% CI 1.07-2.32 in males and OR 1.43 and 95% CI 1.03-2.0 in females) and among males in the lowest quintile group of handgrip strength (OR 1.64 95% CI 1.11-2.42) compared to the reference group. Level of self-reported physical activity was inversely associated with depressive symptoms both in males (OR 1.74 95% CI 1.25-2.36) and females (OR 1.36 95% CI 1.05-1.75). The cardiorespiratory fitness was not associated with depressive symptoms (OR 1.01 95% CI 0.68-1.49 in males and 0.82 95% CI 0.57-1.16 in females).
The results indicate that low level of isometric endurance capacity of trunk extensor muscles is associated with high level of depressive symptoms in both sexes. In males, also poor handgrip strength is associated with increased levels of depressive symptoms. The physical activity level is inversely associated with the prevalence of depressive symptoms among young adults.
Notes
Cites: Clin Evid (Online). 2011;2011. pii: 100321609510
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2011 Jun;131(1-3):193-921195484
Cites: Prev Med. 2011 Oct;53(4-5):284-821820466
Cites: BMJ. 2012;344:e275822674921
Cites: Sports Med. 2000 Mar;29(3):167-8010739267
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2000 Jun;48(6):613-710855595
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Jul 15;152(2):163-7010909953
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2000 Aug;24(8):1202-610968658
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Mar 15;153(6):596-60311257068
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001 Jun;33(6 Suppl):S587-97; discussion 609-1011427783
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2002 Jan;34(1):158-6511782662
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Aug 15;156(4):328-3412181102
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Jun;36(6):698-70312744913
Cites: Mol Psychiatry. 2003 Aug;8(8):738-4412888802
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 2004;(420):38-4615128386
Cites: Int J Sports Med. 2004 Oct;25(7):547-5215459837
Cites: Psychopharmacol Bull. 1973 Jan;9(1):13-284682398
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1984 Apr;144:395-96722401
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1984 Mar;9(2):106-196233709
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1988 Dec;128(6):1340-513264110
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Apr 21;261(15):2229-352648043
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1988 Jan;2(1):59-882976931
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1991 May;48(5):428-322021295
Cites: Int J Sports Med. 1992 Aug;13(6):492-61428382
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1993 Jan;50(1):31-58422219
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1993 Jul;28(3):130-38378808
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1994;377:16-228053361
Cites: Age Ageing. 1996 Nov;25(6):458-649003883
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1998 Jul;33(7):345-549689897
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2005 Apr 18;5:3715836794
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Jan;38(1):173-816394971
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2006;6:23316981990
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2006 Oct 15;60(8):825-3016616729
Cites: Int J Rehabil Res. 2009 Jun;32(2):132-819065108
Cites: Eur Psychiatry. 2011 Sep;26(6):363-921570260
PubMed ID
23731782 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of Self-Perceived Physical Competence and Leisure-Time Physical Activity in Childhood-A Follow-Up Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287017
Source
J Sch Health. 2017 Apr;87(4):236-243
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Lotta Hamari
Olli J Heinonen
Minna Aromaa
Riitta Asanti
Leena Koivusilta
Pasi Koski
Camilla Laaksonen
Jaakko Matomäki
Katja Pahkala
Anni Pakarinen
Sakari Suominen
Sanna Salanterä
Source
J Sch Health. 2017 Apr;87(4):236-243
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Image
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Physical Fitness - psychology
Self Concept
Abstract
The basis of self-perceived physical competence is built in childhood and school personnel have an important role in this developmental process. We investigated the association between initial self-perceived physical competence and reported leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) longitudinally in 10-, 12-, and 15-year-old children.
This longitudinal follow-up study comprises pupils from an elementary school cohort (N = 1346) in the city of Turku, Finland (175,000 inhabitants). The self-perceived physical competence (fitness and appearance) and LTPA data were collected with questionnaires. The full longitudinal data were available from 571 pupils based on repeated studies at the ages of 10, 12, and 15 years in 2004, 2006, and 2010. We analyzed the association of self-perceived physical competence and LTPA using regression models.
Self-perceived physical competence was positively associated with LTPA at all ages (10 years p
PubMed ID
28260241 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations of health related behaviour, social relationships, and health status with persistent physical activity and inactivity: a study of Finnish adolescent twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188393
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2002 Oct;36(5):360-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
M. Aarnio
T. Winter
U. Kujala
J. Kaprio
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2002 Oct;36(5):360-4
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Attitude to Health
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Life Style
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Physical Fitness - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
To examine the association between leisure time physical activity over a three year period and health related behaviour, social relationships, and health status in late adolescence as part of a nationwide longitudinal study.
Five birth cohorts of adolescent twins aged 16 at baseline (n = 5028; 2311 boys and 2717 girls) participated in the study. Questionnaires on leisure time physical activity, other health related behaviour, social relationships, and health status were sent to the twins on their 16th and 17th birthdays and six months after their 18th birthday. The combined response rate to the three questionnaires was 75.8% for boys and 81.7% for girls. Those who answered in all three questionnaires that their frequency of physical activity was 4-5 times a week or more were defined as persistent exercisers, and those who exercised at most twice a month in all three were defined as persistently inactive. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify baseline variables associated with outcome measures.
Overall, 20.4% of boys and 13.0% of girls were persistent exercisers and 6.5% of boys and 5.3% of girls were persistently inactive. In both sexes, smoking, irregular breakfast eating, attending vocational school, and poor self perceived current health were significantly associated with persistent inactivity.
Persistent physical inactivity in adolescents is associated with a less healthy lifestyle, worse educational progression, and poor self perceived health. Tailoring methods to promote physical activity may prove useful for influencing other health habits. Such programmes are indicated for vocational schools in particular.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2000 Jan;90(1):25-3310630133
Cites: Percept Mot Skills. 1986 Apr;62(2):511-63503259
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 1991 Dec;66(12):1426-331776891
Cites: Res Q Exerc Sport. 1992 Dec;63(4):341-81439157
Cites: BMJ. 1994 May 14;308(6939):1291-58205026
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1994 Jul;84(7):1121-68017536
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Aug 1;140(3):195-2058030623
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1996 Feb;49(2):125-348606313
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1996 Nov;86(11):1577-818916523
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 1996 Dec;6(6):371-89046549
Cites: Scand J Soc Med. 1997 Sep;25(3):156-679360271
Cites: Int J Sports Med. 1997 Oct;18(7):549-569414080
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 1998 Mar;32(1):53-79562165
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1998 Sep;47(5):665-759690849
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1999 Jan;31(1):118-239927019
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1999 Feb;23(2):107-1510078843
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 1999 Apr;9(2):120-710220848
Cites: J Stud Alcohol Suppl. 1999 Mar;13:63-7410225489
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 1999 Oct;33(5):325-810522634
Cites: Health Technol Assess. 1999;3(22):1-20710683593
PubMed ID
12351335 View in PubMed
Less detail

The biopsychosocial disease consequence model in rehabilitation: model development in the Finnish 'work hardening' programme for chronic pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211735
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 1996 Jun;19(2):93-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
S. Talo
U. Rytökoski
A. Hämäläinen
V. Kallio
Author Affiliation
Social Insurance Institution, Research and Development Centre, Turku, Finland.
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 1996 Jun;19(2):93-109
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Combined Modality Therapy
Disability Evaluation
Exercise Therapy - methods
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Low Back Pain - psychology - rehabilitation
Physical Endurance
Physical Fitness - psychology
Rehabilitation, Vocational - psychology
Sick Role
Social Adjustment
Abstract
To compare the effectiveness of diverse rehabilitation programmes, comparable data about their effects on maintaining or improving the residual function of the rehabilitation patients should be gathered. Current rehabilitation theories and assessment procedures for functioning are not consistent enough for valid comparisons. The rehabilitation theory should be developed to produce coherence and generalizability to the rehabilitation process. The biopsychosocial disease consequence (BPSDC) model for functioning is presented for this purpose. The model describes the rehabilitation process of patients with chronic pain as a three-axial (biopsychosocial) and three-dimensional (disease consequences) assessment and intervention grid for functioning. It emphasizes the strict mutual relationship between the assessment procedures and intervention plans. Application of the BPSDC model in the Finnish AKSELI project studying the effects of two different programmes on patients with chronic low-back pain is described. Although the AKSELI studies indicated that in addition to the assessment procedures other factors also contributed to valid evaluation of outcomes, and it is hoped that the BPSDC model will encourage researchers to look for definitions of functioning, to assess functioning according to theoretical assumptions about the sub-areas of functioning, and to provide comparable outcome data for the evaluation of various programmes.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Rehabil Res. 1998 Jun;21(2):113-269924675
PubMed ID
8842824 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body image change in obese and overweight women enrolled in a weight-loss intervention: the importance of perceived versus actual physical changes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124235
Source
Body Image. 2012 Jun;9(3):311-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Kathleen A Martin Ginis
Desmond McEwan
Andrea R Josse
Stuart M Phillips
Author Affiliation
Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. martink@mcmaster.ca
Source
Body Image. 2012 Jun;9(3):311-7
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Image
Canada
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Exercise - psychology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - psychology - rehabilitation
Overweight - psychology - rehabilitation
Physical Fitness - psychology
Regression Analysis
Self Concept
Self Efficacy
Weight Loss
Abstract
Using the exercise and self-esteem model as a guiding framework, this study examined variables related to body image change among 88 overweight and obese women (M(age)=28.4±7.8; M(BMI)=31.6±3.5) participating in a 16-week diet and exercise weight-loss intervention. Measures of body image and potential mechanisms of body image change (actual and perceived physical changes, self-efficacy) were administered at baseline, Weeks 8 and 16. Body image improved significantly over the study time-points (ps
PubMed ID
22608984 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body mass index, physical inactivity and low level of physical fitness as determinants of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality--16 y follow-up of middle-aged and elderly men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199796
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Nov;24(11):1465-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
N. Haapanen-Niemi
S. Miilunpalo
M. Pasanen
I. Vuori
P. Oja
J. Malmberg
Author Affiliation
UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland. nina.haapanen@uta.fi
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Nov;24(11):1465-74
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - mortality
Exercise
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - mortality
Physical Fitness - psychology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Self Concept
Abstract
To investigate the independent associations and the possible interaction of body mass index (BMI), leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and perceived physical fitness and functional capability with the risk of mortality.
Prospective 16y follow-up study.
A regionally representative cohort of 35-63-y-old Finnish men (n= 1,090) and women (n= 1,122).
All-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality were derived from the national census data until the end of September 1996 while the initial levels of BMI, LTPA, physical fitness and function were determined from self-administered questionnaires.
After adjustment for age, marital and employment status, perceived health status, smoking and alcohol consumption, the Cox proportional hazards model showed that BMI was not associated with the risk of death among the men or the women. Compared with the most active subjects the men and women with no weekly vigorous activity had relative risks of 1.61 (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.98-2.64) and 4.68 (95% CI, 1.41-15.57), respectively, for CVD mortality, and for the men there was a relative risk of 1.66 (95% CI, 0.92-2.99) for CHD mortality. When compared with the men who perceived their fitness as better than their age-mates, the men with the 'worse' assessment had a relative risk of 3.29 (95% CI, 1.80-6.02) for all-cause mortality and 4.37 (95% CI, 1.80-10.6) for CVD mortality. Men with at least some difficulty in walking a distance of 2 km had a relative risk of 1.62 (95% CI, 1.05-2.50) for all-cause mortality when compared with those who had no functional difficulties. In addition, in the comparison with subjects with no functional difficulties, the men and women who had some difficulty climbing several flights of stairs had relative risks of 1.47 (95% CI, 0.97-2.23) and 2.39 (95% CI, 1.25-4.60) for all-cause mortality, respectively. For CVD mortality the relative risks were 1.85 (95% CI, 1.04-3.30) and 3.38 (1.22-9.41), respectively.
Although BMI did not prove to be an independent risk factor for mortality from CVD, CHD or from all causes combined, perceived physical fitness and functional capability did. An increase in LTPA seems to have a similar beneficial effect on the mortality risk of obese and nonobese men and women, and the effect also seems to be similar for fit and unfit subjects.
PubMed ID
11126344 View in PubMed
Less detail

36 records – page 1 of 4.