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A 26 year physiological description of a National Hockey League team.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156070
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2008 Aug;33(4):753-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
H A Quinney
Randy Dewart
Alex Game
Gary Snydmiller
Darren Warburton
Gordon Bell
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2008 Aug;33(4):753-60
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry - methods
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weights and Measures - methods - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Hand Strength - physiology
Hockey - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Endurance - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Skinfold thickness
Time
Young Adult
Abstract
The primary purpose of this investigation was to examine the physiological profile of a National Hockey League (NHL) team over a period of 26 years. All measurements were made at a similar time of year (pre-season) in 703 male (mean age +/- SD = 24 +/- 4 y) hockey players. The data were analyzed across years, between positions (defensemen, forwards, and goaltenders), and between what were deemed successful and non-successful years using a combination of points acquired during the season and play-off success. Most anthropometric (height, mass, and BMI) and physiological parameters (absolute and relative VO2 peak, relative peak 5 s power output, abdominal endurance, and combined grip strength) showed a gradual increase over the 26 year period. Defensemen were taller and heavier, had higher absolute VO2 peak, and had greater combined grip strength than forwards and goaltenders. Forwards were younger and had higher values for relative VO2 peak. Goaltenders were shorter, had less body mass, a higher sum of skinfolds, lower VO2 peak, and better flexibility. The overall pre-season fitness profile was not related to team success. In conclusion, this study revealed that the fitness profile for a professional NHL ice-hockey team exhibited increases in player size and anaerobic and aerobic fitness parameters over a 26 year period that differed by position. However, this evolution of physiological profile did not necessarily translate into team success in this particular NHL franchise.
PubMed ID
18641719 View in PubMed
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Active commuting to school in children and adolescents: an opportunity to increase physical activity and fitness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140649
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Dec;38(8):873-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Palma Chillón
Francisco B Ortega
Jonatan R Ruiz
Toomas Veidebaum
Leila Oja
Jarek Mäestu
Michael Sjöström
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Education and Sport, School of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain. pchillon@ugr.es
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Dec;38(8):873-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bicycling - physiology
Child
Estonia
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Test
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Questionnaires
Schools
Sweden
Transportation
Walking - physiology
Abstract
The purpose was to describe the patterns of commuting to school in young people and to examine its associations with physical activity (PA) and cardiorespiratory fitness.
The sample comprised 2271 Estonian and Swedish children and adolescents (1218 females) aged 9-10 years and 15-16 years. Data were collected in 1998/99. Mode of commuting to and from school was assessed by questionnaire. Time spent (min/day) in PA and average PA (counts/min) was measured by accelerometry. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed by means of a maximal cycle ergometer test.
Sixty-one percent of the participants reported active commuting to school (ACS). Estonian youth showed lower levels of ACS than Swedish (odds ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.53-0.76) and girls reported lower levels than boys (0.74; 0.62-0.88). ACS boys showed higher PA levels than non-ACS boys for moderate, vigorous, MVPA, and average PA levels (all p = 0.01). Participants who cycled to school had higher cardiorespiratory fitness than walkers or passive travellers (p
PubMed ID
20855356 View in PubMed
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Active or passive journeys and low back pain in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49730
Source
Eur Spine J. 2003 Dec;12(6):581-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Astrid N Sjolie
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. asjolie@hotmail.com
Source
Eur Spine J. 2003 Dec;12(6):581-8
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adolescent
Automobiles - statistics & numerical data
Bicycling - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Male
Norway
Physical Fitness - physiology
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sports - physiology
Vibration - adverse effects
Walking - physiology
Abstract
The objective of this cross-sectional study was to study associations between low back pain (LBP) and modes of transport to school and leisure activities among adolescents. The study population included all adolescents in eighth and ninth grade in two geographic areas in eastern Norway. Eighty-eight adolescents participated (mean age 14.7 years), making the response rate 84%. Data concerning active (walking/bicycling) and passive (bus/car) journeys were obtained from lists and maps from local authorities, and from the pupils, using a questionnaire that also included LBP, activities and wellbeing. Distance walked/bicycled to school was slightly shorter among those reporting LBP in bivariate analyses. Walking/bicycling more than 8 km weekly to regular activities was inversely associated with LBP in multivariate analysis (OR 0.3; 95% confidence interval 0.1-1.0). No associations were found between passive journeys and LBP. The results raise the question for future research of whether lack of active transport may be one cause behind the increase in juvenile LBP.
PubMed ID
12928857 View in PubMed
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Active travel to school and cardiovascular fitness in Danish children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80341
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Oct;38(10):1724-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Cooper Ashley R
Wedderkopp Niels
Wang Han
Andersen Lars Bo
Froberg Karsten
Page Angie S
Author Affiliation
Department of Exercise, Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Bristol, United Kingdom. ashley.cooper@bris.ac.uk
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Oct;38(10):1724-31
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Bicycling - physiology
Cardiovascular System
Child
Denmark
Ergometry
Female
Humans
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Respiration
School Health Services
Students
Walking - physiology
Abstract
PURPOSE: Active travel to school provides an opportunity for daily physical activity. Previous studies have shown that walking and cycling to school are associated with higher physical activity levels. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the way that children and adolescents travel to school is associated with level of cardiovascular fitness. METHODS: Participants were recruited via a proportional, two-stage cluster sample of schools (N = 25) in the region of Odense, Denmark as part of the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS). Nine hundred nineteen participants (529 children, age 9.7 +/- 0.5 yr; 390 adolescents, age 15.5 +/- 0.4 yr) completed a maximal cycle ergometer test to assess cardiorespiratory fitness (Wmax x kg(-1)). Mode of travel to school was investigated by questionnaire. Physical activity was measured in 531 participants using an accelerometer. Regression analyses with robust standard errors and adjustment for confounders (gender, age, body composition (skinfolds), pubertal status, and physical activity) and the cluster sampling procedure were used to compare fitness levels for different travel modes. Multinomial logistic regression was applied to assess the odds for belonging to quartiles of fitness. RESULTS: Children and adolescents who cycled to school were significantly more fit than those who walked or traveled by motorized transport and were nearly five times as likely (OR 4.8; 95% CI 2.8-8.4) to be in the top quartile of fitness. CONCLUSION: Cycling to school may contribute to higher cardiovascular fitness in young people.
PubMed ID
17019293 View in PubMed
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Activity profile and physiological response to football training for untrained males and females, elderly and youngsters: influence of the number of players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100640
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2010 Apr;20 Suppl 1:14-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
M B Randers
L. Nybo
J. Petersen
J J Nielsen
L. Christiansen
M. Bendiksen
J. Brito
J. Bangsbo
P. Krustrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, Section of Human Physiology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. pkrustrup@ifi.ku.dk
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2010 Apr;20 Suppl 1:14-23
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Basal Metabolism - physiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Denmark
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Homeless Persons
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Exertion - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Soccer - physiology
Time and Motion Studies
Videotape Recording
Young Adult
Abstract
The present study examined the activity profile, heart rate and metabolic response of small-sided football games for untrained males (UM, n=26) and females (UF, n=21) and investigated the influence of the number of players (UM: 1v1, 3v3, 7v7; UF: 2v2, 4v4 and 7v7). Moreover, heart rate response to small-sided games was studied for children aged 9 and 12 years (C9+C12, n=75), as well as homeless (HM, n=15), middle-aged (MM, n=9) and elderly (EM, n=11) men. During 7v7, muscle glycogen decreased more for UM than UF (28 +/- 6 vs 11 +/- 5%; P90% of HR(max) ranged from 147 +/- 4 (EM) to 162 +/- 2 (UM) b.p.m. and 10.8 +/- 1.5 (UF) to 47.8 +/- 5.8% (EM). Time >90% of HR(max) (UM: 16-17%; UF: 8-13%) and time spent with high speed running (4.1-5.1%) was similar for training with 2-14 players, but more high-intensity runs were performed with few players (UM 1v1: 140 +/- 17; UM 7v7: 97 +/- 5; P
PubMed ID
20149143 View in PubMed
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Activity profile of top-class female soccer refereeing in relation to the position of the ball.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153667
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2010 Jan;13(1):129-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
J. Mallo
S. Veiga
C. López de Subijana
E. Navarro
Author Affiliation
Sports Biomechanics Laboratory, Faculty of Physical Activity and Sport Science, Politechnical University of Madrid, Spain. javier.mallo@upm.es
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2010 Jan;13(1):129-32
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Analysis of Variance
Athletic Performance - physiology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Running - physiology
Russia
Soccer - physiology
Video Recording
Walking - physiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the activity profile of top-class female soccer referees during competition and to relate it to the position of the ball. Ten matches from the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) under-20 female World Championships held in Russia in 2006 were filmed and the kinematical parameters of the female referees (n=10) and the ball were determined using a two-dimensional photogrammetric video system based on direct linear transformation (DLT) algorithms. Total distance covered during a match was 10 km, of which 1.3 km represented high-intensity activities (>13 km/h). The referees' highest mobility was achieved in the initial 15 min of the match, covering greater distance and performing more intense exercise (P
PubMed ID
19084474 View in PubMed
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The added value of a brief self-efficacy coaching on the effectiveness of a 12-week physical activity program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117957
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2014 Jan;11(1):18-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Jan Seghers
Ann-Sophie Van Hoecke
Astrid Schotte
Joke Opdenacker
Filip Boen
Author Affiliation
Dept of Kinesiology, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2014 Jan;11(1):18-29
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Exercise - physiology
Female
Finland
Health Education - methods
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Metabolic Equivalent - physiology
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Physical Fitness - physiology - psychology
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Efficacy
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Self-efficacy has been found to be an important precondition for behavioral change in sedentary people. The current study examined the effectiveness and added value of including a 15-minute self-efficacy coaching at the start of a 12-week lifestyle physical activity (PA) program.
Participants were randomly assigned to a standard-intervention group (without additional self-efficacy coaching, N = 116) or extra-intervention group (with additional self-efficacy coaching, N = 111). Body mass index (BMI), cardiovascular fitness, self-reported PA, and self-efficacy beliefs were assessed at baseline and immediately after the intervention period. Perceived adherence to the PA program was assessed postintervention.
At posttest, a significant increase in cardiovascular fitness and decrease in BMI were found in both groups. Significant intervention effects emerged on PA behavior, self-efficacy, and program adherence, in favor of the extra-intervention group. Self-efficacy mediated the intervention effect on program adherence whereas no evidence was found for its role as mediator of PA change.
Adding a 15-minute self-efficacy coaching at the start of a lifestyle PA program is a promising strategy to enhance the intervention effects on PA behavior, self-efficacy beliefs, and program adherence. However, the role of self-efficacy as mediator of the intervention effect on in PA was not fully supported.
PubMed ID
23249643 View in PubMed
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Adherence to physical exercise recommendations in people over 65--the SNAC-Kungsholmen study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258217
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2013 Oct;23(5):799-804
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Elisabeth Rydwik
Anna-Karin Welmer
Ingemar Kåreholt
Sara Angleman
Laura Fratiglioni
Hui-Xin Wang
Author Affiliation
1 Departement of Neurobiology, Caring Sciences and Society, Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2013 Oct;23(5):799-804
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Educational Status
Exercise - psychology
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Physical Fitness - physiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
There is limited knowledge regarding to what extent the older population meet the recommendations of physical exercise, especially fitness-enhancing exercise. This study assessed participation in health- and fitness-enhancing exercises in people aged >65, and explored to what extent the possible differences in meeting current recommendations differs by age, gender and education.
The study population was derived from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care, and consisted of a random sample of 2593 subjects, aged 65+ years. Participation in health- and fitness-enhancing exercise according to the WHO and the American College of Sports Medicine's recommendations in relation to age, gender and education was evaluated using multinomial logistic regression adjusted for health indicators and physical performance.
According to the recommendations, 46% of the participants fulfilled the criteria for health-enhancing and 16% for fitness-enhancing exercises. Independent of health indicators and physical performance, women
PubMed ID
23115329 View in PubMed
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Adiposity, aerobic fitness, muscle fitness, and markers of inflammation in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119134
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Apr;45(4):714-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Elin Kolle
Lars Bo Andersen
Sigmund A Anderssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports, Faculty of Teacher Education and Sports, Sogn og Fjordane University College, Sogndal, Norway. jostsj@hisf.no
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Apr;45(4):714-21
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - physiology
Biological Markers - blood
Child
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Inflammation - blood - diagnosis
Inflammation Mediators - blood
Male
Muscle Strength - physiology
Norway
Physical Fitness - physiology
Regression Analysis
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe levels of inflammation markers in Norwegian children and to examine the associations of adiposity, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness with markers of inflammation.
In 2005-2006, 1467 nine-year-olds were randomly selected from all regions in Norway. The participation rate was 89%. The inflammatory markers evaluated included C-reactive protein (CRP), leptin, adiponectin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, tumor necrosis factor-a, hepatocyte growth factor, resistin, and interleukin-6. We assessed muscular strength by measuring explosive, isometric, and endurance strength. Aerobic fitness was measured directly during a maximal cycle ergometer test. Adiposity was expressed as waist circumference (WC).
The girls had significantly higher levels of CRP, leptin, adiponectin, and resistin and lower levels of tumor necrosis factor-a compared with the boys. We observed a graded association of CRP and leptin levels across quintiles of WC, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness (P = 0.001 for all participants). The regression analyses revealed that WC, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness were independently associated with the CRP (WC ß = 0.158, P
PubMed ID
23135365 View in PubMed
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Aerobic fitness, energy balance, and body mass index are associated with training load assessed by activity energy expenditure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154441
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2009 Dec;19(6):871-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
M. Tanskanen
A L T Uusitalo
K. Häkkinen
J. Nissilä
M. Santtila
K R Westerterp
H. Kyröläinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. minna.tanskanen@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2009 Dec;19(6):871-8
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Test
Finland
Humans
Male
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The present study examined whether activity energy expenditure related to body mass (AEE/kg) is associated with maximal aerobic fitness (VO(2max)), energy balance, and body mass index (BMI) during the 2 hardest weeks of the military basic training season (BT). An additional purpose was to study the accuracy of the pre-filled food diary energy intake. Energy expenditure (EE) with doubly labeled water, energy intake (EI), energy balance, and mis-recording was measured from 24 male conscripts with varying VO(2max). AEE/kg was calculated as (EE x 0.9-measured basal metabolic rate)/body mass. The reported EI was lower (P
PubMed ID
18980607 View in PubMed
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310 records – page 1 of 31.