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1989 Canadian guidelines for health care providers for the examination of children suspected to have been sexually abused.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230870
Source
Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1989 May;15 Suppl 3:1-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1989

2012 Canadian Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of fibromyalgia syndrome: executive summary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113256
Source
Pain Res Manag. 2013 May-Jun;18(3):119-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mary-Ann Fitzcharles
Peter A Ste-Marie
Don L Goldenberg
John X Pereira
Susan Abbey
Manon Choinière
Gordon Ko
Dwight E Moulin
Pantelis Panopalis
Johanne Proulx
Yoram Shir
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. mary-ann.fitzcharles@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
Pain Res Manag. 2013 May-Jun;18(3):119-26
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Evidence-Based Medicine - legislation & jurisprudence
Fibromyalgia - diagnosis - drug therapy
Humans
Pain - diagnosis - drug therapy
Physical Examination
Abstract
Recent neurophysiological evidence attests to the validity of fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic pain condition that affects >2% of the population.
To present the evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis, management and patient trajectory of individuals with FM.
A needs assessment following consultation with diverse health care professionals identified questions pertinent to various aspects of FM. A literature search identified the evidence available to address these questions; evidence was graded according to the standards of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. Drafted recommendations were appraised by an advisory panel to reflect meaningful clinical practice.
The present recommendations incorporate the new clinical concepts of FM as a clinical construct without any defining physical abnormality or biological marker, characterized by fluctuating, diffuse body pain and the frequent symptoms of sleep disturbance, fatigue, mood and cognitive changes. In the absence of a defining cause or cure, treatment objectives should be patient-tailored and symptom-based, aimed at reducing global complaints and enhancing function. Healthy lifestyle practices with active patient participation in health care forms the cornerstone of care. Multimodal management may include nonpharmacological and pharmacological strategies, although it must be acknowledged that pharmacological treatments provide only modest benefit. Maintenance of function and retention in the workforce is encouraged.
The new Canadian guidelines for the treatment of FM should provide health professionals with confidence in the complete care of these patients and improve clinical outcomes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23748251 View in PubMed
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[About the participation of RF Defense Ministry centers of State sanitary-and-epidemiological inspection in organization of compulsory medical examinations of certain categories among civil personnel].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165559
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2006 Oct;327(10):12-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006

Accuracy and quality in the nursing documentation of pressure ulcers: a comparison of record content and patient examination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77064
Source
J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;31(6):328-35
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gunningberg Lena
Ehrenberg Anna
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. lena.gunningberg@akademiska.se
Source
J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;31(6):328-35
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Documentation - standards
Female
Health services needs and demand
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Assessment - standards
Nursing Audit
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Records - standards
Observer Variation
Physical Examination - nursing - standards
Practice Guidelines
Pressure Ulcer - diagnosis - epidemiology - nursing
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the accuracy and describe the quality of nursing documentation of pressure ulcers in a hospital care setting. DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey was used comparing retrospective audits of nursing documentation of pressure ulcers to previous physical examinations of patients. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: All inpatient records (n = 413) from February 5, 2002, at the surgical/orthopedic (n = 144), medical (n = 182), and geriatric (n = 87) departments of one Swedish University hospital. INSTRUMENTS: The European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel data collection form and the Comprehensiveness In Nursing Documentation. METHODS: All 413 records were reviewed for presence of notes on pressure ulcers; the findings were compared with the previous examination of patients' skin condition. Records with notes on pressure ulcers (n = 59) were audited using the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and Comprehensiveness In Nursing Documentation instruments. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of pressure ulcers obtained by audit of patient records was 14.3% compared to 33.3% when the patients' skin was examined. The lack of accuracy was most evident in the documentation of grade 1 pressure ulcers. The quality of the nursing documentation of pressure ulcer (n = 59) was generally poor. CONCLUSIONS: Patient records did not present valid and reliable data about pressure ulcers. There is a need for guidelines to support the care planning process and facilitate the use of research-based knowledge in clinical practice. More attention must be focused on the quality of clinical data to make proper use of electronic patient records in the future.
PubMed ID
15867708 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of clinical assessment of heart murmurs by office based (general practice) paediatricians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200598
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1999 Nov;81(5):409-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
I. Haney
M. Ipp
W. Feldman
B W McCrindle
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatric Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada.
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1999 Nov;81(5):409-12
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Competence
Education, Medical, Continuing
Educational Status
Female
Heart Murmurs - diagnosis
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pediatrics - education - standards
Physical Examination - standards
Referral and Consultation
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
To determine the diagnostic accuracy of physical examination by office based (general practice) paediatricians in the evaluation of heart murmurs.
Each of 30 office based paediatricians blindly examined a random sample of children with murmurs (43% of which were pathological). Sensitivity and specificity were calculated and were related to paediatricians' characteristics.
Mean (SD) sensitivity was 82 (24)% with a mean specificity of 72 (24)% in differentiating pathological from innocent murmurs, with further investigations requested for 54% of assessments. The addition of a referral strategy would have increased mean sensitivity to 87 (20)% and specificity to 98 (8)%. Diagnostic accuracy was not significantly related to the paediatricians' age, education or practice characteristics, but was related to referral practices and confidence in assessment.
Diagnostic accuracy of clinical assessment of heart murmurs by office based paediatricians is suboptimal, and educational strategies are needed to improve accuracy and reduce unnecessary referrals and misdiagnosis.
Notes
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Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1993 Sep;147(9):975-78362816
PubMed ID
10519714 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accuracy of tele-oncology compared with face-to-face consultation in head and neck cancer case conferences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19396
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2001;7(6):338-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
J. Stalfors
S. Edström
T. Björk-Eriksson
C. Mercke
J. Nyman
T. Westin
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. joacim.stalfors@orlforum.com
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2001;7(6):338-43
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case Management - organization & administration
Feasibility Studies
Female
Head and Neck Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Examination
Remote Consultation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Telemedicine - methods
Abstract
Telemedicine was introduced for weekly tumour case conferences between Sahlgrenska University Hospital and two district hospitals in Sweden. The accuracy of tele-oncology was determined using simulated telemedicine consultations, in which all the material relating to each case was presented but without the patient in person. The people attending the conference were asked to determine the tumour ('TNM') classification and treatment. The patient was then presented in person, to give the audience the opportunity to ask questions and perform a physical examination. Then a new discussion regarding the tumour classification and the treatment plan took place, and the consensus was recorded. Of the 98 consecutive patients studied in this way, 80 could be evaluated by both techniques. Of these 80, 73 (91%) had the same classification and treatment plan in the telemedicine simulation as in the subsequent face-to-face consultation. In four cases the TNM classification was changed and for three patients the treatment plan was altered. The specialists also had to state their degree of confidence in the tele-oncology decisions. When they recorded uncertainty about their decision, it was generally because they wanted to palpate the tumour. In five of the seven patients with a different outcome, the clinical evaluation was stated to be dubious or not possible. The results show that telemedicine can be used safely for the management of head and neck cancers.
PubMed ID
11747635 View in PubMed
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[A comparative evaluation of the health of children based on the results of medical check-ups and questionnaires].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177896
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2004 Jul-Aug;(4):9-14
Publication Type
Article
Author
T M Maksimova
V B Belov
N P Lushkina
N A Barabanova
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2004 Jul-Aug;(4):9-14
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services - utilization
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Physical Examination - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Abstract
Objective evaluations of population's health belong to the most important tasks of the public-health science. Such evaluations made in respect to children are of extra importance. One must comprehensively understand the potentialities and abilities of the methods used for the purpose. A comparative evaluation of 387 children, aged 10, was based on the findings of medical check-ups and on questionnaires of their parents. 37.7% of children, who were evaluated by their mothers as having good health, were diagnosed by doctors as having a chronic disease, i.e. the diagnosis did not entail any life limitations for such children. 40% of those children, who were referred to by their parents as sick (poor health), were classified by doctors as belonging not to category 3 (chronic pathology) but to a category of healthier children (category 2). Below 10% of children, who were describe by their parents as having poor health, were among those who were put by doctors on the list of group 3 on the basis of medical check-ups. As for those children who had an actively displayed chronic disease with a pronounced clinical course, like bronchial asthma, ulcer etc., the opinions of doctors and of their parents coincided in a majority of cases. The comparative evaluations of children' health based on questionnaires of their parents and on medical check-ups exposed a certain coincidence and specificity of such evaluations since they are based on different approaches.
PubMed ID
15490651 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Activities of the regional occupational health center under present-day conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187073
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2002;(11):25-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
I N Piktushanskaia
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2002;(11):25-30
Date
2002
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coal Mining
European Union
Humans
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - prevention & control
Occupational Health Services - manpower - trends
Physical Examination
Pneumoconiosis - diagnosis - prevention & control
Russia
USSR
Abstract
The authors represented experience of contemporary activities of Occupational center in Rostov region, demonstrated efficiency of thorough medical examinations carried by mobile clinical and diagnostic laboratories, suggested 4-levels structure of occupational service organization.
PubMed ID
12520907 View in PubMed
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Acute forensic medical procedures used following a sexual assault among treatment-seeking women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175653
Source
Women Health. 2004;40(2):53-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Hester Dunlap
Paulette Brazeau
Lana Stermac
Mary Addison
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto at Sunnybrook and Women's College of Health Sciences Centre, Room 231, 7th Floor, 252 Bloor Street, West, Toronto, ON, M5S 1V6, Canada. hester_dunlap@camh.net
Source
Women Health. 2004;40(2):53-65
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Forensic Pathology - standards
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Physical Examination
Rape - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Perception
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health Services - standards
Abstract
Despite the negative physical and mental health outcomes of sexual assault, a minority of sexually assaulted women seek immediate post-assault medical and legal services. This study identified the number and types of acute forensic medical procedures used by women presenting at a hospital-based urgent care centre between 1997 and 2001 within 72 hours following a reported sexual assault. The study also examined assault and non-assault factors associated with the use of procedures. It was hypothesized that assault characteristics resembling the stereotype of rape would be associated with the use of more procedures. The multiple regression indicated that injury severity, coercion severity, homelessness, and delay in presentation were significantly associated with the number of procedures received. Findings provide partial support for the hypothesis that post-assault procedures would be associated with the stereotype of rape, and highlight homeless women as a group particularly at risk for not receiving adequate medical treatment following a sexual assault.
PubMed ID
15778138 View in PubMed
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769 records – page 1 of 77.