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A 1-Year Quantitative Survey of Noro-, Adeno-, Human Boca-, and Hepatitis E Viruses in Raw and Secondarily Treated Sewage from Two Plants in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272273
Source
Food Environ Virol. 2015 Sep;7(3):213-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
M. Myrmel
H. Lange
E. Rimstad
Source
Food Environ Virol. 2015 Sep;7(3):213-23
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoviridae - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Environmental monitoring
Genotype
Hepatitis E virus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Human bocavirus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Norovirus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Norway
Phylogeny
Seasons
Sewage - virology
Water Pollution
Water Purification - instrumentation
Abstract
A study of enteric viruses in raw and treated sewage from two secondary treatment plants, which received sewage from Oslo city (plant A) and small municipalities in Hedmark county in Norway (plant B), showed high levels of noro-, adeno-, and bocavirus throughout the year. A seasonal variation was observed for adeno- and GII norovirus with higher levels during winter and bocavirus that had more positive samples during winter. The virus concentrations in raw sewage were comparable in the two plants, with medians (log10 genome copies per liter) of 6.1, 6.3, 6.0, and 4.5 for noro GI, noro GII, adeno-, and bocavirus, respectively. The level of hepatitis E virus was not determined as it was below the limit of quantification. The mean log10 virus reduction was 0.55 (plant A) and 1.44 (plant B) with the highest reduction found in the plant with longer hydraulic retention time. The adenoviruses were dominantly serotype 41, while serotype 12 appeared sporadically. Of the 102 raw and treated sewage samples that were tested, eight were positive for hepatitis E virus of which four were from treated sewage. Two of the four obtained gene sequences from hepatitis E virus originated from the rural sewage samples and showed high similarity with a genotype 3 strain of hepatitis E virus detected in local piglets. Two other hepatitis E virus sequences obtained from urban sewage samples showed high similarities with genotype 3 strains isolated from urban sewage in Spain and a human genotype 1 isolate from India. The study gives information on the levels of noroviruses in raw and treated sewage, which is valuable to risk assessment, information indicating that some infections with hepatitis E viruses in Norway have a regional origin and that human bocavirus 2 and 3 are prevalent in the Norwegian population.
PubMed ID
26003323 View in PubMed
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A 300-million-year record of atmospheric carbon dioxide from fossil plant cuticles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95961
Source
Nature. 2001 May 17;411(6835):287-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-2001
Author
Retallack G J
Author Affiliation
Department of Geological Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene 97403-1272, USA. gregr@darkwing.uoregon.edu
Source
Nature. 2001 May 17;411(6835):287-90
Date
May-17-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atmosphere - chemistry
Carbon Dioxide - metabolism
Cold Climate
Fossils
Ginkgo biloba - cytology - growth & development - metabolism
Greenhouse Effect
Ice
Methane - metabolism
Phylogeny
Plant Leaves - cytology - growth & development - metabolism
Plants, Medicinal
Pollen
Seasons
Water - metabolism
Abstract
To understand better the link between atmospheric CO2 concentrations and climate over geological time, records of past CO2 are reconstructed from geochemical proxies. Although these records have provided us with a broad picture of CO2 variation throughout the Phanerozoic eon (the past 544 Myr), inconsistencies and gaps remain that still need to be resolved. Here I present a continuous 300-Myr record of stomatal abundance from fossil leaves of four genera of plants that are closely related to the present-day Ginkgo tree. Using the known relationship between leaf stomatal abundance and growing season CO2 concentrations, I reconstruct past atmospheric CO2 concentrations. For the past 300 Myr, only two intervals of low CO2 (2,000 p.p.m.v.) concentrations. These results are consistent with some reconstructions of past CO2 (refs 1, 2) and palaeotemperature records, but suggest that CO2 reconstructions based on carbon isotope proxies may be compromised by episodic outbursts of isotopically light methane. These results support the role of water vapour, methane and CO2 in greenhouse climate warming over the past 300 Myr.
Notes
Comment In: Nature. 2001 May 17;411(6835):247-811357108
PubMed ID
11357126 View in PubMed
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Abstract profiles of structural stability point to universal tendencies, family-specific factors, and ancient connections between languages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120224
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e45198
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Dan Dediu
Stephen C Levinson
Author Affiliation
Language and Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Dan.Dediu@mpi.nl
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e45198
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Americas
Asia
Australia
Bayes Theorem
Cultural Evolution - history
Europe
History, 21st Century
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Humans
Language - history
Linguistics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Phylogeny
Siberia
Abstract
Language is the best example of a cultural evolutionary system, able to retain a phylogenetic signal over many thousands of years. The temporal stability (conservatism) of basic vocabulary is relatively well understood, but the stability of the structural properties of language (phonology, morphology, syntax) is still unclear. Here we report an extensive Bayesian phylogenetic investigation of the structural stability of numerous features across many language families and we introduce a novel method for analyzing the relationships between the "stability profiles" of language families. We found that there is a strong universal component across language families, suggesting the existence of universal linguistic, cognitive and genetic constraints. Against this background, however, each language family has a distinct stability profile, and these profiles cluster by geographic area and likely deep genealogical relationships. These stability profiles seem to show, for example, the ancient historical relationships between the Siberian and American language families, presumed to be separated by at least 12,000 years, and possible connections between the Eurasian families. We also found preliminary support for the punctuated evolution of structural features of language across families, types of features and geographic areas. Thus, such higher-level properties of language seen as an evolutionary system might allow the investigation of ancient connections between languages and shed light on the peopling of the world.
Notes
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Erratum In: PLoS One.2012;7(10). doi: 10.1371/annotation/ceff8775-a4e3-45cb-b6c9-dd62d9179d59
PubMed ID
23028843 View in PubMed
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[Abundance and diversity of methanotrophic Gammaproteobacteria in northern wetlands].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259581
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2014 Mar-Apr;83(2):204-14
Publication Type
Article
Author
O V Danilova
S N Dedysh
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2014 Mar-Apr;83(2):204-14
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biodiversity
Fresh Water - microbiology
Gammaproteobacteria - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Methane - metabolism
Methylococcaceae - genetics
Methylocystaceae - genetics
Molecular Sequence Data
Oxygenases - genetics
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S
Russia
Wetlands
Abstract
Numeric abundance, identity and pH preferences of methanotrophic Gammaproteobacteria (type I methanotrophs) inhabiting the northern acidic wetlands were studied. The rates of methane oxidation by peat samples from six-wetlands of European Northern Russia (pH 3.9-4.7) varied from 0.04 to 0.60 µg CH4 g(-1) peat h(-1). The number of cells revealed by hybridization with fluorochrome-labeled probes M84 + M705 specific for type I methanotrophs was 0.05-2.16 x 10(5) cells g(-1) dry peat, i.e. 0.4-12.5% of the total number of methanotrophs and 0.004-0.39% of the total number of bacteria. Analysis of the fragments of the pmoA gene encoding particulate methane monooxygenase revealed predominance of the genus Methylocystis (92% of the clones) in the studied sample of acidic peat, while the proportion of the pmoA sequences of type I methanotrophs was insignificant (8%). PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene fragments of type I methanotrophs with TypeIF-Type IR primers had low specificity, since only three sequences out of 53 analyzed belonged to methanotrophs and exhibited 93-99% similarity to those of Methylovulum, Methylomonas, and Methylobacter species. Isolates of type I methanotrophs obtained from peat (strains SH10 and 83A5) were identified as members of the species Methylomonaspaludis and Methylovulum miyakonense, respectively. Only Methylomonaspaludum SH10 was capable of growth in acidic media (pH range for growth 3.8-7.2 with the optimum at pH 5.8-6.2), while Methylovulum miyakonense 83A5 exhibited the typical growth characteristics of neutrophilic methanotrophs (pH range for growth 5.5-8.0 with the optimum at pH 6.5-7.5).
PubMed ID
25423724 View in PubMed
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Abundant Trimethylornithine Lipids and Specific Gene Sequences Are Indicative of Planctomycete Importance at the Oxic/Anoxic Interface in Sphagnum-Dominated Northern Wetlands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273730
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015 Sep;81(18):6333-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Eli K Moore
Laura Villanueva
Ellen C Hopmans
W Irene C Rijpstra
Anchelique Mets
Svetlana N Dedysh
Jaap S Sinninghe Damsté
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015 Sep;81(18):6333-44
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acidobacteria - chemistry - isolation & purification
Bacteria - chemistry - genetics - isolation & purification
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Lipids - analysis - chemistry
Oxidation-Reduction
Phylogeny
RNA, Bacterial - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Russia
Soil - chemistry
Soil Microbiology
Sphagnopsida - chemistry - genetics - microbiology
Sweden
Wetlands
Abstract
Northern wetlands make up a substantial terrestrial carbon sink and are often dominated by decay-resistant Sphagnum mosses. Recent studies have shown that planctomycetes appear to be involved in degradation of Sphagnum-derived debris. Novel trimethylornithine (TMO) lipids have recently been characterized as abundant lipids in various Sphagnum wetland planctomycete isolates, but their occurrence in the environment has not yet been confirmed. We applied a combined intact polar lipid (IPL) and molecular analysis of peat cores collected from two northern wetlands (Saxnäs Mosse [Sweden] and Obukhovskoye [Russia]) in order to investigate the preferred niche and abundance of TMO-producing planctomycetes. TMOs were present throughout the profiles of Sphagnum bogs, but their concentration peaked at the oxic/anoxic interface, which coincided with a maximum abundance of planctomycete-specific 16S rRNA gene sequences. The sequences detected at the oxic/anoxic interface were affiliated with the Isosphaera group, while sequences present in the anoxic peat layers were related to an uncultured planctomycete group. Pyrosequencing-based analysis identified Planctomycetes as the major bacterial group at the oxic/anoxic interface at the Obukhovskoye peat (54% of total 16S rRNA gene sequence reads), followed by Acidobacteria (19% reads), while in the Saxnäs Mosse peat, Acidobacteria were dominant (46%), and Planctomycetes contributed to 6% of the total reads. The detection of abundant TMO lipids in planctomycetes isolated from peat bogs and the lack of TMO production by cultures of acidobacteria suggest that planctomycetes are the producers of TMOs in peat bogs. The higher accumulation of TMOs at the oxic/anoxic interface and the change in the planctomycete community with depth suggest that these IPLs could be synthesized as a response to changing redox conditions at the oxic/anoxic interface.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26150465 View in PubMed
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Abyssivirga alkaniphila gen. nov., sp. nov., an alkane-degrading, anaerobic bacterium from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent system, and emended descriptions of Natranaerovirga pectinivora and Natranaerovirga hydrolytica.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275915
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2016 Apr;66(4):1724-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Anders Schouw
Tove Leiknes Eide
Runar Stokke
Rolf Birger Pedersen
Ida Helene Steen
Gunhild Bødtker
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2016 Apr;66(4):1724-34
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkanes - metabolism
Arctic Regions
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Base Composition
Biodegradation, Environmental
Clostridiales - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Fatty Acids - chemistry
Glycolipids - chemistry
Hydrothermal Vents - microbiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Peptidoglycan - chemistry
Phospholipids - chemistry
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
A strictly anaerobic, mesophilic, syntrophic, alkane-degrading strain, L81T, was isolated from a biofilm sampled from a black smoker chimney at the Loki's Castle vent field. Cells were straight, rod-shaped, Gram-positive-staining and motile. Growth was observed at pH?6.2-9.5, 14-42?°C and 0.5-6?% (w/w) NaCl, with optima at pH?7.0-8.2, 37?°C and 3% (w/w) NaCl. Proteinaceous substrates, sugars, organic acids and hydrocarbons were utilized for growth. Thiosulfate was used as an external electron acceptor during growth on crude oil. Strain L81T was capable of syntrophic hydrocarbon degradation when co-cultured with a methanogenic archaeon, designated strain LG6, isolated from the same enrichment. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain L81T is affiliated with the family Lachnospiraceae, and is most closely related to the type strains of Natranaerovirga pectinivora (92?% sequence similarity) and Natranaerovirga hydrolytica (90%). The major cellular fatty acids of strain L81T were C15?:?0, anteiso-C15?:?0 and C16?:?0, and the profile was distinct from those of the species of the genus Natranaerovirga. The polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, three unidentified phospholipids, four unidentified glycolipids and two unidentified phosphoglycolipids. The G+C content of genomic DNA was determined to be 31.7?mol%. Based on our phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic results, strain L81T is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus of the family Lachnospiraceae, for which we propose the name Abyssivirga alkaniphila gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Abyssivirga alkaniphila is L81T (=DSM 29592T=JCM 30920T). We also provide emended descriptions of Natranaerovirga pectinivora and Natranaerovirga hydrolytica.
PubMed ID
26822139 View in PubMed
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Acceptable protective efficacy of influenza vaccination in young military conscripts under circumstances of incomplete antigenic and genetic match.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194986
Source
Vaccine. 2001 Apr 30;19(23-24):3253-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-2001
Author
R. Pyhälä
M. Haanpää
M. Kleemola
R. Tervahauta
R. Visakorpi
L. Kinnunen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. reijo.pyhala@ktl.fi
Source
Vaccine. 2001 Apr 30;19(23-24):3253-60
Date
Apr-30-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amino Acid Sequence
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Antigens, Viral - genetics
Base Sequence
DNA Primers - genetics
Disease Outbreaks
Finland - epidemiology
Genes, Viral
Humans
Influenza A virus - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Influenza Vaccines - genetics - immunology - pharmacology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control - virology
Male
Military Personnel
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Abstract
Commercial inactivated parenteral influenza vaccines reduced febrile (> or = 38 degrees C) respiratory illness by 53% (95% CL: 41-63%) during a 3 week outbreak in 1998 when A/Sydney/5/97(H3N2)-like influenza viruses were shown to be the predominant etiological agents and an older antigenic variant, A/Nanchang/933/95, served as the vaccine virus. The calculatory efficacy for preventing virologically diagnosed influenza infections was 57% (95% CL: 40-68%). The study population consisted of 1374 young male military conscripts. Vaccination coverage on a voluntary basis was 67%. Vaccination was ineffective in preventing febrile illness during a second epidemic wave lasting 2 weeks when mainly adenoviruses were shown to have been circulating in the garrison. Out of the 36 nasopharyngeal aspirates positive for influenza A by antigen detection, 18 A/Sydney/5/97-like strains (10 from non-vaccinated and eight from vaccinated subjects) and two A/Nanchang/933/95-like strains (both from non-vaccinated subjects) were isolated in MDCK cell cultures. Intraepidemic variation was detected among the A/Sydney/5/97-like field strains in their HA1 sequences and reactivity in HI tests, but no evidence was obtained that this variation would have been of significance to the virus in breaking through the vaccination-induced immunity.
PubMed ID
11312022 View in PubMed
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Actinoalloteichus fjordicus sp. nov. isolated from marine sponges: phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genomic characterisation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292492
Source
Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek. 2017 Dec; 110(12):1705-1717
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Imen Nouioui
Christian Rückert
Joost Willemse
Gilles P van Wezel
Hans-Peter Klenk
Tobias Busche
Jörn Kalinowski
Harald Bredholt
Sergey B Zotchev
Author Affiliation
School of Biology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK.
Source
Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek. 2017 Dec; 110(12):1705-1717
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Actinobacteria - chemistry - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Animals
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Computational Biology - methods
Genes, Bacterial
Genome, Bacterial
Genomics - methods
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Metabolomics - methods
Molecular Sequence Annotation
Multigene Family
Phenotype
Phylogeny
Porifera - microbiology
Secondary Metabolism - genetics
Abstract
Two actinobacterial strains, ADI 127-17T and GBA 129-24, isolated from marine sponges Antho dichotoma and Geodia barretti, respectively, collected at the Trondheim fjord in Norway, were the subjects of a polyphasic study. According to their 16S rRNA gene sequences, the new isolates were preliminarily classified as belonging to the genus Actinoalloteichus. Both strains formed a distinct branch, closely related to the type strains of Actinoalloteichus hoggarensis and Actinoalloteichus hymeniacidonis, within the evolutionary radiation of the genus Actinoalloteichus in the 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic tree. Isolates ADI 127-17T and GBA 129-24 exhibited morphological, chemotaxonomic and genotypic features distinguishable from their close phylogenetic neighbours. Digital DNA: DNA hybridization and ANI values between strains ADI 127-17T and GBA 129-24 were 97.6 and 99.7%, respectively, whereas the corresponding values between both tested strains and type strains of their closely related phylogenetic neighbours, A. hoggarensis and A. hymeniacidonis, were well below the threshold for delineation of prokaryotic species. Therefore, strains ADI 127-17T (= DSM 46855T) and GBA 129-24 (= DSM 46856) are concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Actinoalloteichus for which the name of Actinoalloteichus fjordicus sp. nov. (type strain ADI 127-17T = DSM 46855T = CECT 9355T) is proposed. The complete genome sequences of the new strains were obtained and compared to that of A. hymeniacidonis DSM 45092T and A. hoggarensis DSM 45943T to unravel unique genome features and biosynthetic potential of the new isolates.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28770445 View in PubMed
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Actinobaculum schaalii, a common uropathogen in elderly patients, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146533
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2010 Jan;16(1):76-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Steffen Bank
Anders Jensen
Thomas M Hansen
Karen M Søby
Jørgen Prag
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Viborg Hospital, Heibergs Allé 4, DK-8800 Viborg, Denmark. stb@mb.au.dk
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2010 Jan;16(1):76-80
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinomycetaceae - genetics
Actinomycetales Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Urinary Tract Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Urine - microbiology
Abstract
Actinobaculum schaalii can cause urinary tract infections and septicemia but is difficult to identify by cultivation. To obtain a fast diagnosis and identify A. schaalii, we developed a TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR. Routine urine samples were obtained from 177 hospitalized patients and 75 outpatients in Viborg County, Denmark, in 2008-2009. The PCR detected A. schaalii in 22% of samples from patients >60 years of age. This assay showed that A. schaalii is more common than implied by routine cultivation. In 90% of PCR-positive urine samples, other common uropathogens were identified. This finding suggests that A. schaalii is a common, undetected, bacterial pathogen. Our results suggest that A. schaalii may be a more common pathogen than previously thought, especially in patients with unexplained chronic urinary tract infections, who are often treated with trimethoprim or ciprofloxacin, to which A. schaalii is resistant.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20031046 View in PubMed
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Active and passive surveillance and phylogenetic analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi elucidate the process of Lyme disease risk emergence in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143987
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Jul;118(7):909-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Nicholas H Ogden
Catherine Bouchard
Klaus Kurtenbach
Gabriele Margos
L Robbin Lindsay
Louise Trudel
Soulyvane Nguon
François Milord
Author Affiliation
Centre for Food-Borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Public Health Agency of Canada, Saint-Hyacinthe, Québec, Canada. nicholas_ogden@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Jul;118(7):909-14
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Borrelia burgdorferi - classification - genetics
Cluster analysis
Communicable Diseases, Emerging - epidemiology - microbiology
Demography
Genetic Variation
Humans
Ixodes - microbiology
Logistic Models
Lyme Disease - epidemiology - microbiology
Phylogeny
Population Surveillance - methods
Quebec - epidemiology
Rodentia - parasitology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Tick Infestations - epidemiology - veterinary
Abstract
Northward expansion of the tick Ixodes scapularis is driving Lyme disease (LD) emergence in Canada. Information on mechanisms involved is needed to enhance surveillance and identify where LD risk is emerging.
We used passive and active surveillance and phylogeographic analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi to investigate LD risk emergence in Quebec.
In active surveillance, we collected ticks from the environment and from captured rodents. B. burgdorferi transmission was detected by serological analysis of rodents and by polymerase chain reaction assays of ticks. Spatiotemporal trends in passive surveillance data assisted interpretation of active surveillance. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of B. burgdorferi in ticks identified likely source locations of B. burgdorferi.
In active surveillance, we found I. scapularis at 55% of sites, and we were more likely to find them at sites with a warmer climate. B. burgdorferi was identified at 13 I. scapularis-positive sites, but infection prevalence in ticks and animal hosts was low. Low infection prevalence in ticks submitted in passive surveillance after 2004-from the tick-positive regions identified in active surveillance-coincided with an exponential increase in tick submissions during this time. MLST analysis suggested recent introduction of B. burgdorferi from the northeastern United States.
These data are consistent with I. scapularis ticks dispersed from the United States by migratory birds, founding populations where the climate is warmest, and then establishment of B. burgdorferi from the United States several years after I. scapularis have established. These observations provide vital information for public health to minimize the impact of LD in Canada.
Notes
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Comment In: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Jul;118(7):A30520601318
PubMed ID
20421192 View in PubMed
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