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1495 records – page 1 of 150.

Endemics or strangers? The integrative re-appraisal of taxonomy and phylogeny of the Greenland Lymnaeidae (Mollusca: Gastropoda).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293478
Source
C R Biol. 2017 Nov - Dec; 340(11-12):541-557
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Maxim V Vinarski
Ivan N Bolotov
Katrin Schniebs
Ivan O Nekhaev
Anna K Hundsdoerfer
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Macroecology and Biogeography of Invertebrates, Saint-Petersburg State University, Universitetskaya Emb. 7-9, 199034 Saint-Petersburg, Russian Federation; Museum of Siberian Aquatic Mollusks, Omsk State Pedagogical University, Naberezhnaya Tukhachevskogo 14, 644099 Omsk, Russian Federation. Electronic address: radix.vinarski@gmail.com.
Source
C R Biol. 2017 Nov - Dec; 340(11-12):541-557
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Gastropoda - classification
Greenland
Phylogeny
Abstract
The Lymnaeidae constitute a significant part of the freshwater molluscan diversity of Greenland. Since 1842, not less than 10 nominal taxa of the species and variety rank were described to organize the diversity of the Greenland lymnaeid snails. All previous attempts to revise these taxa were systematically based on morphological evidence only. Here, we provide a molecular analysis of the phylogenetic affinity and systematic status of three alleged species of the Greenland Lymnaeidae: Lymnaea vahlii (Møller, 1842), L. holboellii (Møller, 1842), and L. pingelii (Møller, 1842). We examined the newly collected material and inspected the type series of the three species. Our results show a very tight relationship between the Greenland snails and the Nearctic species Ladislavella catascopium (Say, 1817) s. lato. From the genetic point of view, the Greenland populations should be classified within L. catascopium, albeit probably with the merit of a subspecies status. The three nominal species of lymnaeids described by Møller (1842) are apparently synonyms of each other. Our findings assume a rather recent colonization of Greenland by snails arriving from the North American mainland, which is compatible with the so-called "tabula rasa" hypothesis, proposed to explain the currently observed taxonomic diversity of continental animals and plants of the North Atlantic islands. No lymnaeid species endemic to Greenland is thus revealed.
PubMed ID
29097113 View in PubMed
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Towards a formal genealogical classification of the Lezgian languages (North Caucasus): testing various phylogenetic methods on lexical data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269426
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(2):e0116950
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Alexei Kassian
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(2):e0116950
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Dagestan
Linguistics - classification
Pedigree
Phylogeny
Abstract
A lexicostatistical classification is proposed for 20 languages and dialects of the Lezgian group of the North Caucasian family, based on meticulously compiled 110-item wordlists, published as part of the Global Lexicostatistical Database project. The lexical data have been subsequently analyzed with the aid of the principal phylogenetic methods, both distance-based and character-based: Starling neighbor joining (StarlingNJ), Neighbor joining (NJ), Unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA), Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), Unweighted maximum parsimony (UMP). Cognation indexes within the input matrix were marked by two different algorithms: traditional etymological approach and phonetic similarity, i.e., the automatic method of consonant classes (Levenshtein distances). Due to certain reasons (first of all, high lexicographic quality of the wordlists and a consensus about the Lezgian phylogeny among Caucasologists), the Lezgian database is a perfect testing area for appraisal of phylogenetic methods. For the etymology-based input matrix, all the phylogenetic methods, with the possible exception of UMP, have yielded trees that are sufficiently compatible with each other to generate a consensus phylogenetic tree of the Lezgian lects. The obtained consensus tree agrees with the traditional expert classification as well as some of the previously proposed formal classifications of this linguistic group. Contrary to theoretical expectations, the UMP method has suggested the least plausible tree of all. In the case of the phonetic similarity-based input matrix, the distance-based methods (StarlingNJ, NJ, UPGMA) have produced the trees that are rather close to the consensus etymology-based tree and the traditional expert classification, whereas the character-based methods (Bayesian MCMC, UMP) have yielded less likely topologies.
Notes
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Cites: Nature. 2003 Nov 27;426(6965):435-914647380
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 1987 Jul;4(4):406-253447015
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 1997 Jul;14(7):685-959254330
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2006 Feb;23(2):254-6716221896
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2011 Oct;28(10):2905-2021571925
PubMed ID
25719456 View in PubMed
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[Genetic and phenotypic differentiation of Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull in Pritobolie and Europe].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261172
Source
Genetika. 2014 Sep;50(9):1050-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
S N Sannikov
I V Petrova
O S Dymshakova
O E Cherepanova
Source
Genetika. 2014 Sep;50(9):1050-8
Date
Sep-2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Calluna - genetics
Genetic Variation
Phylogeny
Siberia
Abstract
Geographic variation and differentiation of the chloroplast DNA haplotypes and morpho-anatomical leaf parameters were assessed in a number of eastern European groups of Calluna vulgaris (L.)Hull populations and in the Pritobolien group of populations of this species in Western Siberia, which have long been isolated from the European populations. Sharply pronounced genetic and phenotypic distances and their gradients between the Pritobolien and European population groups were revealed. These distances were many times higher than those between the relatively homogeneous eastern European groups. The data obtained generally supported the hypothesis on the phenogenetic divergence of the Pritobolien marginal populations of C. vulgaris from the European, probably at the subspecies level.
PubMed ID
25735135 View in PubMed
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A new Scandinavian Chamaedrilus species (Clitellata: Enchytraeidae), with additional notes on others.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296796
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Nov 14; 4521(3):417-429
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-14-2018
Author
Svante Martinsson
MÅrten Klinth
Christer ErsÉus
Author Affiliation
Systematics and Biodiversity, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 463, SE-405 30 Göteborg, Sweden.. svante.martinsson@bioenv.gu.se.
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Nov 14; 4521(3):417-429
Date
Nov-14-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Denmark
Forests
Norway
Oligochaeta
Phylogeny
Sweden
Abstract
Chamaedrilus (earlier referred to as Cognettia) is a well-known genus of terrestrial and limnic enchytraeids, currently with 19 known species in the world. Some of its species are morphologically cryptic and can only be identified using genetic (DNA) information. Many of them reproduce asexually, and the prevalence of sexual mature individuals is generally low in the populations. Chamaedrilus asloae sp. nov. (Clitellata: Enchytraeidae) is described based on material from two rivers in Norway, one in Sweden, and from a wet deciduous forest in Denmark. With the material at hand, no morphological characters completely separate C. asloae from C. chalupskyi; none of the available specimens of the new species are sexually mature. However, four molecular markers (two mitochondrial, two nuclear) support that C. asloae is a distinct, separately evolved lineage, which is sister to a clade consisting of C. glandulosus and C. varisetosus. In this study, too, the fully developed sexual organs of C. chalupskyi and C. varisetosus are described and illustrated.
PubMed ID
30486156 View in PubMed
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[Revision of the Taxonomic Position of the Olkhon Mountain Vole (Rodentia, Cricetidae)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274568
Source
Izv Akad Nauk Ser Biol. 2016 Mar-Apr;(2):171-81
Publication Type
Article
Author
S Yu Bodrov
A Yu Kostygov
L V Rudneva
N I Abramson
Source
Izv Akad Nauk Ser Biol. 2016 Mar-Apr;(2):171-81
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arvicolinae - classification - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial
Phylogeny
Siberia
Abstract
An analysis of the phylogenetic position of the Olkhon mountain vole (Alticolaolchonensis Litvinov 1960) using the sequences of four nuclear (BRCA, GHR, LCAT, and IRBP) and one mitochondrial (cyt. b) genes was undertaken. It was noted that, until recently, multiple studies of the systematic position of this vole had been based exclusively on morphological data, while the major taxonomic traits contained contradictory information regarding both the subgeneric status of this species and its genus. It was established that the molecular data and morphology data allow us to attribute the Lake Baikal vole unambiguously to the nominative subgenus Alticola instead of Aschizomys.
PubMed ID
27396178 View in PubMed
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Green light to an integrative view of Microscolex phosphoreus (Dug├Ęs, 1837) (Annelida: Clitellata: Acanthodrilidae).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296817
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Oct 04; 4496(1):175-189
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-04-2018
Author
Emilia Rota
Svante Martinsson
Christer ErsÉus
Valentin N Petushkov
Natalja S Rodionova
Pietro Omodeo
Author Affiliation
Department of Physics, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Siena, Via P.A. Mattioli 4, IT-53100 Siena, Italy. rota@unisi.it.
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Oct 04; 4496(1):175-189
Date
Oct-04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
DNA
DNA Barcoding, Taxonomic
Oligochaeta
Phylogeny
Siberia
Abstract
The small synanthropic and peregrine earthworm Microscolex phosphoreus (Dugès, 1837) is reported for the first time from Siberia. Morphological and DNA barcode (COI) analyses of this and widely separate samples worldwide demonstrate that, as currently identified, M. phosphoreus is a heterogeneous taxon, with divergent lineages occurring often in the same locality and hardly providing geographically structured genetic signals. The combined morphological and genetic evidence suggests that at least four of the found clades should be reclassified as separate species, both morphologically and genetically distinct from each other. However, as the specimen number was limited and only the COI gene was studied for the genetic work, we hesitate in formally describing new species. There would also be the problem of assigning the available names to specific lineages. Our findings encourage careful external and anatomical examination and using reliable characters such as the interchaetal distances and spermathecal morphology for correct identification and for deeper evaluation of cryptic diversity in this interesting bioluminescent worm.
PubMed ID
30313693 View in PubMed
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[Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the ant genus Formica L. (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) from Palearctic region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289697
Source
Genetika. 2016 Aug; 52(8):919-30
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
I A Antonov
Yu S Bukin
Source
Genetika. 2016 Aug; 52(8):919-30
Date
Aug-2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Ants - genetics
Arctic Regions
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Phylogeny
Abstract
Sixty-five sequences of the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene fragment (759 bp) and 23 sequences of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 gene fragment (224 bp) were compared in ants of the genus Formica L. from different regions of the Palearctic and in Polyergus rufescens Latr. as outgroup. In total, 28 species of the genus Formica were examined. As a result, dated trees with a molecular clock were constructed showing the phylogenetic relationships of Formica ants. The topology of the obtained tree based on the Cyt-b sequences was found to be not consistent with the generally accepted opinion on the Formica rufa and F. rufibarbis groups. New data on the formation history of the present-day fauna of Formica ants of the Palearctic were obtained. It was demonstrated that a considerable fraction of the examined species (about a third) were formed in the Quaternary Period.
PubMed ID
29368887 View in PubMed
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[Phylogeny of charrs of the genus Salvelinus based on mitochondrial DNA data].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262326
Source
Genetika. 2015 Jan;51(1):63-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
A G Oleinik
L A Skurikhina
Vl A Brykov
Source
Genetika. 2015 Jan;51(1):63-77
Date
Jan-2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Evolution, Molecular
Phylogeny
Trout - genetics
Abstract
Charrs of the genus Salvelinus (including Salvethymus) represent a monophyletic group of salmonid fishes that diverged from the common ancestor without subdivision into subgenera. The phylogenesis of the genus is characterized by four cycles of mitochondrial genome divergence. The first one, belonging to the Late Miocene--the border between Miocene and Pliocene (6 to 4 million years ago)--was associated with the consecutive divergence of the S. fontinalis, S. namaycush, S. levanidovi, and S. leucomaenis basal branches. Two divergence events, including separation of the ancestral lineage of western Pacific group of S. m. krascheninnikovi and the following segregation of the common ancestor into two mitochondrial phyla, happened within the period of 3 to 2 million years ago. The next cycle is attributed to the time interval of about 1 million years ago and includes the divergence of both phyla. In one phylum, a relatively quick isolation of Arctic and eastern Pacific phylogroups, along with the divergence of the latter phylogroup into S. confluentus and S. m. lordi lineages, took place. At the same time, the second phylum diverged into the S. m. malma and S. alpinus phylogenetic groups. At the final stage (Middle to Late Pleistocene), differentiation of the taxa within the phylogenetic groups took place.
PubMed ID
25857194 View in PubMed
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[Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the ant genus Formica L. (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) from Palearctic region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289539
Source
Genetika. 2016 Aug; 52(8):919-30
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
I A Antonov
Yu S Bukin
Source
Genetika. 2016 Aug; 52(8):919-30
Date
Aug-2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Ants - genetics
Arctic Regions
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Phylogeny
Abstract
Sixty-five sequences of the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene fragment (759 bp) and 23 sequences of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 gene fragment (224 bp) were compared in ants of the genus Formica L. from different regions of the Palearctic and in Polyergus rufescens Latr. as outgroup. In total, 28 species of the genus Formica were examined. As a result, dated trees with a molecular clock were constructed showing the phylogenetic relationships of Formica ants. The topology of the obtained tree based on the Cyt-b sequences was found to be not consistent with the generally accepted opinion on the Formica rufa and F. rufibarbis groups. New data on the formation history of the present-day fauna of Formica ants of the Palearctic were obtained. It was demonstrated that a considerable fraction of the examined species (about a third) were formed in the Quaternary Period.
PubMed ID
29368887 View in PubMed
Less detail

Taxonomic Position and Status of Arctic Gynaephora and Dicallomera Moths (Lepidoptera, Erebidae, Lymantriinae).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271832
Source
Folia Biol (Krakow). 2015;63(4):257-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Vladimir A Lukhtanov
Olga A Khruleva
Source
Folia Biol (Krakow). 2015;63(4):257-61
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animals
Arctic Regions
Moths - classification - genetics
Phylogeny
Abstract
We use analysis of mitochondrial DNA barcodes in combination with published data on morphology to rearrange the taxonomy of two arctic species, Gynaephora groenlandica and G. rossii. We demonstrate that (1) the taxon lugens Kozhanchikov, 1948 originally described as a distinct species is a subspecies of Gynaephora rossii, and (2) the taxon kusnezovi Lukhtanov et Khruliova, 1989 originally described as a distinct species in the genus Dicallomera is a subspecies of Gynaephora groenlandica. We also provide the first evidence for the occurrence of G. groenlandica in the Palearctic region (Wrangel Island).
PubMed ID
26975140 View in PubMed
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1495 records – page 1 of 150.