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240 records – page 1 of 24.

A 57-year follow-up of occlusal changes, oral health, and attitudes toward teeth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135775
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2011 Apr;139(4 Suppl):S102-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Arild Stenvik
Lisen Espeland
Rolf E Berg
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthodontics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2011 Apr;139(4 Suppl):S102-8
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Case-Control Studies
Child
Dental Care - utilization
Esthetics, Dental
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Malocclusion - complications - pathology - psychology
Malocclusion, Angle Class III - etiology
Norway
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene - utilization
Photography, Dental
Self-Assessment
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - etiology
Tooth Loss - etiology
Abstract
Very few studies have addressed long-term development and risks associated with untreated malocclusion. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in occlusion in a lifelong perspective and to compare oral health and attitudes toward teeth among persons with malocclusion with those having normal occlusion.
In 1950 an epidemiologic survey of 2349 8-year-olds was conducted and included 4 intraoral photographs. Three selected samples with different malocclusions (deep bite, crossbite, or irregular teeth) and 1 sample with normal occlusion (a total of 183 subjects) were, 57 years later, invited for examination and an extensive interview about dental experiences and attitudes. Sixty-nine responded (38%) and constitute the subjects studied.
Malocclusion remained the same or worsened except in subjects having deep bite in childhood, which in some improved and in others became worse. Crowding generally increased. Sixteen persons reported moderate or severe temporomandular joint (TMJ) problems, and of these 7 belonged to the group with crossbite in childhood. With few exceptions, the subjects in all samples had good oral hygiene, visited the dentist regularly, and had well-preserved dentitions. Mean number of missing teeth was significantly lower among those with normal occlusion compared with the malocclusion groups. Individuals with normal occlusion responded favorably to all questions related to attitudes and experiences about their teeth, while responses in the malocclusion groups varied.
Persons with the particular malocclusions examined experienced more problems related to teeth later in life compared with those having normal occlusion in childhood.
PubMed ID
21435527 View in PubMed
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Source
Contemp Longterm Care. 1990 Jun;13(6):31-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990

[Accident and disaster training of media personnel in hospital environment].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192354
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 31;98(44):4865-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-31-2001
Author
J. Lundälv
Author Affiliation
Akut- och katastrofmedicinskt centrum (AKMC), Olycksanalysgruppen, Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeå.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 31;98(44):4865-6
Date
Oct-31-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Crisis Intervention
Disaster planning
Disasters
Emergency Service, Hospital
Humans
Journalism, Medical
Mass Media
Photography
Sweden
PubMed ID
11729801 View in PubMed
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Age-related macular degeneration in Chinese-Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200858
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 1999 Aug;34(5):266-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
T S Chang
D. Hay
P. Courtright
Author Affiliation
Vitreoretinal Trials and Methodology Centre, Vancouver, BC.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 1999 Aug;34(5):266-71
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
China - ethnology
Choroidal Neovascularization - epidemiology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Fluorescein Angiography
Humans
Macular Degeneration - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Photography
Prevalence
Retinal Detachment - epidemiology
Abstract
Ethnicity has long been suspected to play a role in the risk of macular degeneration as well as its neovascular complications. We carried out a study to determine the prevalence of retinal diseases in Chinese-Canadians presenting for fluorescein angiography compared to a matched group of Canadians of European origin.
We reviewed 20,000 consecutive fluorescein angiograms obtained between December 1987 and November 1993 at a tertiary referral centre for ophthalmic care in Vancouver. All patients identified by name as being of Chinese ancestry were identified and matched to a patient of European ancestry. The two groups were compared in regard to the prevalence of specific retinal diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
Among the first 10,000 fluorescein angiograms, 417 patients of Chinese ancestry were identified, of whom 61 (14.6%) had the primary diagnosis of AMD. The rate among the patients of European ancestry was 30.4% (127/417) (odds ratio [OR] 2.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.79 to 2.56) (p
PubMed ID
10486685 View in PubMed
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The Alaska Blind Child Discovery project: rationale, methods and results of 4000 screenings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5379
Source
Alaska Med. 2000 Jul-Sep;42(3):58-72
Publication Type
Article
Author
R W Arnold
E G Gionet
A I Jastrzebski
T A Kovtoun
C J Machida
M D Armitage
L J Coon
Author Affiliation
Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus Ophthalmic Associates, PC, Anchorage, Alaska 99501-2242, USA. eyedoc@alaska.net
Source
Alaska Med. 2000 Jul-Sep;42(3):58-72
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Amblyopia - diagnosis
Blindness - prevention & control
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Costs and Cost Analysis
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Medical Records
Photography - methods
Physical Examination
Time Factors
Vision Screening - economics - instrumentation - methods
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Photoscreening allows lay persons to adapt the Enhanced Brückner Test to preschoolers in an attempt to identify refractive amblyopia. The Alaska Blind Child Discovery (ABCD) project is charitably funded and administered. METHODS: MTI photoscreening was offered to children in rural and urban communities in southern Alaska from 1996 through June 1999. Parents answered questions concerning the child's health, family ocular history and whether the child had any eye "Warning Signs." The MTI images were interpreted by two eye doctors using a modification in MTI published guidelines. RESULTS: Out of 4000 screenings performed on 3930 children, there was an overall "not normal" interpretation of 9% and an inconclusive rate of 1%. The mean S.D. age was 3.9 2 years. Only 6% had had a prior eye exam. The average number of Polaroid pictures per screening was 1.16. Follow-up data on "not normal" results was obtained on just over 50%. The positive predictive value during the first two years was 77% but improved to 92% from 1998-1999. Affirmative answers to the questions concerning previous eye exam, child's health, siblings eye health and positive "Warning Signs" were significantly associated with "not normal" interpretations but affirmative answers about eye health of mother, father and relatives were not. Community penetrance of photoscreening to the target age-group ranged from only 5% for Anchorage to almost 100% for the Bristol Bay public health nurses. Five percent of parents of "positive" results surveyed would not have recommended screening for their friends. Equipment functioned dependably even in remote Alaska. CONCLUSION: Charitable volunteer Polaroid photoscreening detected amblyopia and significant pediatric eye disease in over 300 children during the first 3.5 years of ABCD.
PubMed ID
11042938 View in PubMed
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Amateur photographs reveal population history of a colonial seabird.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278256
Source
Curr Biol. 2016 Mar 21;26(6):R226-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-21-2016

Amblyopia detection by camera: Gateway to portable, inexpensive vision screening (calibration and validation of inexpensive, pocket-sized photoscreeners).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5344
Source
Alaska Med. 2004 Jul-Sep;46(3):63-72
Publication Type
Article
Author
Robert W Arnold
Andrew W Arnold
Lee Stark
Koni K Arnold
Rachel Leman
M Diane Armitage
Author Affiliation
The Alaska Blind Child Discovery Coordinating Center, Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Ophthalmic Associates, 542 West Second Avenue, Anchorage, Alaska 99501-2242, USA.
Source
Alaska Med. 2004 Jul-Sep;46(3):63-72
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Amblyopia - diagnosis
Calibration
Child
Child, Preschool
Contact Lenses
Humans
Infant
Photography - instrumentation
Refractive Errors - diagnosis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Vision Screening - economics - instrumentation - methods
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Photoscreening can allow early detection of amblyopia. The Gateway DV-S20, and similar models of miniature, digital flash cameras, have similar optical dimensions to existing photoscreeners for less than $200. METHODS: These cameras were calibrated on known, threshold amblyogenic refractive errors induced by placing minus and toric contact lenses on a normal subject's left eye. The DV-S20 was then applied to known amblyopic patients. Students under age 7 were vision screened with patched acuity and sequential photoscreeners (MTI and Gateway). RESULTS: The digital cameras and the MTI photoscreeners produced similar magnitude interpretable crescents for amblyopiagenic refractive errors. They had very similar validation with sensitivities of 80-90% and specificities of 98% for serious eye disorders in known patients and school-aged children. CONCLUSION: Combined with careful interpretation, pocket-sized, digital flash cameras provide a portable and inexpensive digital alternative for pediatric photoscreening. A category 3 CPT code (0065T) can be used for this valid, public health technique: Amblyopia Detection By Camera (ADBC).
PubMed ID
15839597 View in PubMed
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[Ambulance personnel should take pictures at the site of accidents!].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193891
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Jun 27;98(26-27):3162-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-27-2001
Author
J. Andréasson
A. Jonsson
B O Suserud
S. Aström
Author Affiliation
Högskolan i Borås, institutionen Vårdhögskolan.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Jun 27;98(26-27):3162-3
Date
Jun-27-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Ambulances - manpower
Documentation
Emergency Medical Technicians
Humans
Photography
Sweden
PubMed ID
11478216 View in PubMed
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Analysis of tooth marks in a homicide case. Observations by means of visual description, stereo-photography, scanning electron microscopy and stereometric graphic plotting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251476
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1976;34(1):1-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
G. Bang
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1976;34(1):1-11
Date
1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bites and Stings - pathology
Bites, Human - pathology
Breast - injuries
Dental Models
Expert Testimony
Female
Forensic Dentistry
Homicide
Humans
Male
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Nipples
Norway
Odontometry
Photography - methods
Tooth - anatomy & histology
Abstract
In 1957 a woman was murdered in Oslo. Her left breast exhibited tooth marks. A man was arrested and sentenced to life imprisonment partly because of the dental evidence. He never admitted guilt and filed a petition for retrial. The present author was appointed as new dental expert. The material consisted of the fixed breast, models of the bite mark and models of the teeth of the convict, and several photographs. By means of visual examination, a magnifying glass, a lens stereoscope and a stereomicroscope characteristic details were noted. Stereoscopic picture pairs were taken, the material was studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and a stereometricgraphic plotting method permitting the outline of the tooth mark or the biting edge of a tooth to be registered in great detail in all three dimensions in the form of a contour map. This method has not previously been applied in the analysis of tooth marks in human skin. These examinations revealed no discrepancies but showed many corresponding characteristic features between the tooth marks and the teeth of the convict, resulting in the conclusion that it is highly probable that the tooth marks in the breast were made by the teeth of the convict.
PubMed ID
1066945 View in PubMed
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240 records – page 1 of 24.