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Accumulation of astaxanthin by a new Haematococcus pluvialis strain BM1 from the white sea coastal rocks (Russia).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261314
Source
Mar Drugs. 2014 Aug;12(8):4504-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Konstantin Chekanov
Elena Lobakova
Irina Selyakh
Larisa Semenova
Roman Sidorov
Alexei Solovchenko
Source
Mar Drugs. 2014 Aug;12(8):4504-20
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carotenoids - metabolism
Chlorophyta - metabolism
Cytoplasm - metabolism
Ecosystem
Environment
Light
Lipids
Nitrogen - metabolism
Phosphorus - metabolism
Russia
Salinity
Stress, Physiological - physiology
Temperature
Xanthophylls - metabolism
Abstract
We report on a novel arctic strain BM1 of a carotenogenic chlorophyte from a coastal habitat with harsh environmental conditions (wide variations in solar irradiance, temperature, salinity and nutrient availability) identified as Haematococcus pluvialis Flotow. Increased (25‰) salinity exerted no adverse effect on the growth of the green BM1 cells. Under stressful conditions (high light, nitrogen and phosphorus deprivation), green vegetative cells of H. pluvialis BM1 grown in BG11 medium formed non-motile palmelloid cells and, eventually, hematocysts capable of a massive accumulation of the keto-carotenoid astaxanthin with a high nutraceutical and therapeutic potential. Routinely, astaxanthin was accumulated at the level of 4% of the cell dry weight (DW), reaching, under prolonged stress, 5.5% DW. Astaxanthin was predominantly accumulated in the form of mono- and diesters of fatty acids from C16 and C18 families. The palmelloids and hematocysts were characterized by the formation of red-colored cytoplasmic lipid droplets, increasingly large in size and number. The lipid droplets tended to merge and occupied almost the entire volume of the cell at the advanced stages of stress-induced carotenogenesis. The potential application of the new strain for the production of astaxanthin is discussed in comparison with the H. pluvialis strains currently employed in microalgal biotechnology.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25196836 View in PubMed
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Artificial inoculation-perspectives in tailings phytostabilization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179429
Source
Int J Phytoremediation. 2004;6(1):1-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Ioana G Petrisor
Smaranda Dobrota
Kostas Komnitsas
Ioan Lazar
J Michael Kuperberg
Mihai Serban
Author Affiliation
DPRA Inc., San Marcos, CA 92069, USA. Ioana.Petrisor@dpra.com
Source
Int J Phytoremediation. 2004;6(1):1-15
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Azotobacter - metabolism
Bacillus megaterium - metabolism
Calcium Sulfate - metabolism
Environmental pollution - prevention & control
Humans
Industrial Waste
Mining
Phosphorus - metabolism
Poaceae - growth & development
Soil Microbiology
Soil Pollutants - metabolism
Sulfur - metabolism
Abstract
Intensive mining and processing activities worldwide resulted in the generation of huge amounts of waste (tailings), generally characterized as toxic, radioactive, and/or hazardous. The exposure potential and, hence, the risk posed by such wastes is enhanced by a general lack of vegetation. Phytostabilization has proven to be efficient in reducing this risk. However, establishing vegetation on tailing dumps may be expensive due to the intensive use of amendments and chemical fertilizers. In this article, investigations on artificial inoculation of mine tailings with bacterial strains as a means to improve the development of vegetative covers and reduce application cost by eliminating chemical fertilization are presented and discussed. The development of plants and microbial communities from tailings, as well as the impact of inoculation on metal uptake in plants, were studied. Experiments were carried out in greenhouse using two types of mine tailings (phosphogypsum and sulphidic tailings) from the Romanian Black Sea coast. Indigenous herbaceous plants were cultivated on tailings with the addition of chemical fertilizers versus bacterial inoculation. After a 6-month experimental period, excellent plant growth, which is associated with a rich microbial community, was observed in all inoculated treatments, in contrast with poor plant growth and microbiota from the chemical fertilization treatments alone. Additionally, artificial inoculation improved plant resistance to heavy metals by reducing the uptake of some toxic metals. Once a rich microbial community is established, inoculation may be discontinued. Based on these results, efficient and cost-effective phytostabilization schemes can be proposed.
PubMed ID
15224772 View in PubMed
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[Assimilation of dietary calcium and phosphorus and the level of nitrous metabolism in 6-7 year old children].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111892
Source
Pediatriia. 1966 Jun;45(6):33-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1966

Bacterioplankton Responses to Increased Organic Carbon and Nutrient Loading in a Boreal Estuary-Separate and Interactive Effects on Growth and Respiration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298299
Source
Microb Ecol. 2018 Jul; 76(1):144-155
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2018
Author
Ana R A Soares
Emma S Kritzberg
Ioana Custelcean
Martin Berggren
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund University, SE-223 62, Lund, Sweden. anaralvessoares@gmail.com.
Source
Microb Ecol. 2018 Jul; 76(1):144-155
Date
Jul-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Bacteria - growth & development - metabolism
Carbon - chemistry - metabolism
Ecosystem
Environmental monitoring
Estuaries
Fresh Water - chemistry
Heterotrophic Processes
Nutrients - chemistry - metabolism
Phosphorus - metabolism
Plankton - growth & development - metabolism
Rivers - chemistry
Salinity
Seasons
Seawater - microbiology
Sweden
Abstract
Increases in the terrestrial export of dissolved organic carbon (C) to rivers may be associated with additional loading of organic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) to the coastal zone. However, little is known about how these resources interact in the regulation of heterotrophic bacterioplankton metabolism in boreal coastal ecosystems. Here, we measured changes in bacterioplankton production (BP) and respiration (BR) in response to full-factorial (C, N, and P) enrichment experiments at two sites within the Öre estuary, northern Sweden. The BR was stimulated by single C additions and further enhanced by combined additions of C and other nutrients. Single addition of N or P had no effect on BR rates. In contrast, BP was primarily limited by P at the site close to the river mouth and did not respond to C or N additions. However, at the site further away from the near the river mouth, BP was slightly stimulated by single additions of C. Possibly, the natural inflow of riverine bioavailable dissolved organic carbon induced local P limitation of BP near the river mouth, which was then exhausted and resulted in C-limited BP further away from the river mouth. We observed positive interactions between all elements on all responses except for BP at the site close to the river mouth, where P showed an independent effect. In light of predicted increases in terrestrial P and C deliveries, we expect future increases in BP and increases of BR of terrestrially delivered C substrates at the Öre estuary and similar areas.
PubMed ID
29255936 View in PubMed
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[Determination of radiophosphorus in tumors, in organs, and in tissue in mice.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29089
Source
Mikrobiol Zh. 1954;24(5):48-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
1954
Author
Iu O UMANS'KYI
Source
Mikrobiol Zh. 1954;24(5):48-57
Date
1954
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Neoplasms - metabolism
Phosphorus - metabolism
PubMed ID
13244312 View in PubMed
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[Determination of some phosphorus fractions in the uterine muscle in different functional states of the female organism]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature28764
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1967;5:42-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1967

Diet and prostate cancer risk in a cohort of smokers, with a specific focus on calcium and phosphorus (Finland).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196664
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Oct;11(9):859-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
J M Chan
P. Pietinen
M. Virtanen
N. Malila
J. Tangrea
D. Albanes
J. Virtamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. jmlchan@hsph.harvard.edu
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Oct;11(9):859-67
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Body mass index
Calcium - metabolism
Calcium, dietary
Dietary Carbohydrates
Dietary Proteins - metabolism
Double-Blind Method
Finland
Fructose - metabolism
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Phosphorus - metabolism
Phosphorus, Dietary
Prostatic Neoplasms - etiology - metabolism
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Abstract
Calcium, phosphorus, fructose, and animal protein are hypothesized to be associated with prostate cancer risk, potentially via their influence on 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. We examined these nutrients and overall diet and prostate cancer risk in the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC Study).
The ATBC Study was a randomized 2 x 2 trial of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene on lung cancer incidence conducted among Finnish male smokers; 27,062 of the men completed a food-use questionnaire at baseline, and comprise the current study population. There were 184 incident clinical (stage 2-4) prostate cancer cases diagnosed between 1985 and 1993. We used Cox proportional hazards models to examine associations between dietary intakes and prostate cancer.
We did not observe significant independent associations for calcium and phosphorus and prostate cancer risk. However, men with lower calcium and higher phosphorus intake had a multivariate relative risk of 0.6 (95% CI 0.3-1.0) compared to men with lower intakes of both nutrients, adjusting for age, smoking, body mass index, total energy, education, and supplementation group. Of the other foods and nutrients examined, none was significantly associated with risk.
This study provides, at best, only weak evidence for the hypothesis that calcium and phosphorus are independently associated with prostate cancer risk, but suggests that there may be an interaction between these nutrients.
PubMed ID
11075876 View in PubMed
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[Effect of amino acid deficiency on bone tissue growth and formation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39556
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1985 May-Jun;(3):38-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
V I Smoliar
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1985 May-Jun;(3):38-42
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acids, Essential - deficiency
Animals
Body Height
Bone Development
Bone and Bones - metabolism
Calcium - metabolism
Child
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Growth Plate - metabolism
Humans
Phosphorus - metabolism
Rats
Abstract
Intake of the essential amino acids, threonine, lysine and methionine by Ukrainian children of different height was studied. The processes of osteogenesis and phosphorus-calcium metabolism in rats with the above amino acids deficiency in the diet were also subjected to study. A direct correlation was established between intake of the amino acids under study and the height of schoolchildren. The deficiency of the amino acids in the diet of experimental animals contributed to the retardation of the growth, destructive changes, an increase in the content of hydroxyproline, a reduction of phosphomonoesterase-I activity in bones, and alterations in phosphorus-calcium metabolism.
PubMed ID
4036075 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.