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The 1988 and 2002 phocine distemper virus epidemics in European harbour seals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6586
Source
Dis Aquat Organ. 2006 Jan 30;68(2):115-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-2006
Author
Tero Härkönen
Rune Dietz
Peter Reijnders
Jonas Teilmann
Karin Harding
Ailsa Hall
Sophie Brasseur
Ursula Siebert
Simon J Goodman
Paul D Jepson
Thomas Dau Rasmussen
Paul Thompson
Author Affiliation
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Box 50007, 10405 Stockholm, Sweden. tero.harkonen@swipnet.se
Source
Dis Aquat Organ. 2006 Jan 30;68(2):115-30
Date
Jan-30-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Carnivora
Comparative Study
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Disease Reservoirs - veterinary
Disease Vectors
Distemper - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Distemper Virus, Phocine
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Male
Morbillivirus - classification - pathogenicity
Phoca - virology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
We present new and revised data for the phocine distemper virus (PDV) epidemics that resulted in the deaths of more than 23 000 harbour seals Phoca vitulina in 1988 and 30,000 in 2002. On both occasions the epidemics started at the Danish island of Anholt in central Kattegat, and subsequently spread to adjacent colonies in a stepwise fashion. However, this pattern was not maintained throughout the epidemics and new centres of infection appeared far from infected populations on some occasions: in 1988 early positive cases were observed in the Irish Sea, and in 2002 the epidemic appeared in the Dutch Wadden Sea, 6 wk after the initiation of the outbreak at Anholt Island. Since the harbour seal is a rather sedentary species, such 'jumps' in the spread among colonies suggest that another vector species could have been involved. We discussed the role of sympatric species as disease vectors, and suggested that grey seal populations could act as reservoirs for PDV if infection rates in sympatric species are lower than in harbour seals. Alternatively, grey seals could act as subclinical infected carriers of the virus between Arctic and North Sea seal populations. Mixed colonies of grey and harbour seal colonies are found at all locations where the jumps occurred. It seems likely that grey seals, which show long-distance movements, contributed to the spread among regions. The harbour seal populations along the Norwegian coast and in the Baltic escaped both epidemics, which could be due either to genetic differences among harbour seal populations or to immunity. Catastrophic events such as repeated epidemics should be accounted for in future models and management strategies of wildlife populations.
PubMed ID
16532603 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accumulation and trophic transfer of organotins in a marine food web from the Danish coastal waters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172406
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2005 Nov 1;350(1-3):72-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2005
Author
Jakob Strand
Jens A Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
National Environmental Research Institute, Department of Marine Ecology, P.O. Box 358, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. jak@dmu.dk
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2005 Nov 1;350(1-3):72-85
Date
Nov-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Birds
Denmark
Environmental monitoring
Fishes
Food chain
Fucus
Humans
Invertebrates
Male
Organotin Compounds - analysis
Phoca
Phocoena
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Zosteraceae
Abstract
The presence of organotin compounds, e.g., tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPhT) including the di- and monosubstituted breakdown products, was studied in a representative marine food web in order to assess the accumulation potential at different trophic levels in Danish coastal waters. This included samples of two species of seaweed, four species of invertebrates, four species of fish, five species of birds and two species of mammals. All organisms were sampled away from harbour areas and the organotin concentrations found in this study can therefore be considered to reflect a general level in organisms living in Danish coastal waters. All the samples analysed contained organotin compounds. The highest hepatic concentrations of butyltins were found in flounder (60-259 ng g-1 wet weight [ww], as Sn), eider duck (12-202 ng g-1 ww) and harbour porpoise (134-2283 ng g-1 ww). The lowest concentrations were found in seaweed and a plant-feeding bird. TPhT or its degradation products were also found in most of the samples with the highest concentrations in flounder (9.8-74 ng g-1 ww), cod (23-28 ng g-1 ww) and great black-backed gull (19-24 ng g-1 ww). This indicates an input of TPhT in the region, probably from the use as antifouling agent. A high variance in accumulation potential was found between the species, even between species at the same trophic level, which probably reflects the species-specific differences in exposure routes and the capabilities to metabolise and eliminate the organotin compounds. This study gives evidence of the importance of biomagnification of butyltin in harbour porpoises and, to a lesser extent, in fish and birds.
PubMed ID
16227074 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute phase protein haptoglobin in blood plasma samples of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) of the Wadden Sea and of the isle Helgoland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98848
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol B Biochem Mol Biol. 2010 Jan;155(1):67-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
A. Kakuschke
H-B Erbsloeh
S. Griesel
A. Prange
Author Affiliation
GKSS Research Centre, Institute for Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht, Germany. antjekakuschke@web.de
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol B Biochem Mol Biol. 2010 Jan;155(1):67-71
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute-Phase Proteins - metabolism
Age Factors
Animals
Denmark
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Geography
Germany
Haptoglobins - metabolism
Male
Marine Biology - methods
Oceans and Seas
Phoca - blood
Seasons
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Haptoglobin (Hp) which is synthesized in response to infection, inflammation, trauma or toxicological damage is known as a major acute phase protein in numerous species. Quantification of the circulating concentration of this protein can provide an objective measure of the health status, but there is a lack of investigations on harbour seals. We investigated the Hp concentration in samples of 123 seals (Phoca vitulina) from the German and Danish Wadden Sea to study physiological ranges of Hp levels. Hp levels between 2002, the end of the phocine distemper virus epidemic (PDV), and 2007 were considered, and Hp concentrations between animals of different sex, ages as well as living areas were compared. Furthermore, as a case study, six animals from the open sea isle Helgoland were investigated in 2006. Influences on the health status of the seal population e.g. the PDV epidemic were reflected by increased Hp levels in North Sea seals in 2002. The results of the Wadden Sea seals showed no significant age-, sex-, or geographical area-related differences. Interestingly, for the seals of the open sea isle Helgoland higher Hp values were measured compared to the Wadden Sea seals. The present study demonstrates that Hp can be used as a diagnostic tool to monitor the health status of harbour seals.
PubMed ID
19818410 View in PubMed
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Amphibious hearing in spotted seals (Phoca largha): underwater audiograms, aerial audiograms and critical ratio measurements.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257971
Source
J Exp Biol. 2014 Mar 1;217(Pt 5):726-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2014
Author
Jillian M Sills
Brandon L Southall
Colleen Reichmuth
Author Affiliation
Department of Ocean Sciences, University of California at Santa Cruz, 100 Shaffer Road, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA.
Source
J Exp Biol. 2014 Mar 1;217(Pt 5):726-34
Date
Mar-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air
Animals
Environment
Female
Hearing
Hearing Tests - veterinary
Phoca - physiology
Sound Spectrography
Water
Abstract
Spotted seals (Phoca largha) inhabit Arctic regions that are facing both rapid climate change and increasing industrialization. While little is known about their sensory capabilities, available knowledge suggests that spotted seals and other ice seals use sound to obtain information from the surrounding environment. To quantitatively assess their auditory capabilities, the hearing of two young spotted seals was tested using a psychophysical paradigm. Absolute detection thresholds for tonal sounds were measured in air and under water over the frequency range of hearing, and critical ratios were determined using octave-band masking noise in both media. The behavioral audiograms show a range of best sensitivity spanning four octaves in air, from approximately 0.6 to 11 kHz. The range of sensitive hearing extends across seven octaves in water, with lowest thresholds between 0.3 and 56 kHz. Critical ratio measurements were similar in air and water and increased monotonically from 12 dB at 0.1 kHz to 30 dB at 25.6 kHz, indicating that the auditory systems of these seals are quite efficient at extracting signals from background noise. This study demonstrates that spotted seals possess sound reception capabilities different from those previously described for ice seals, and more similar to those reported for harbor seals (Phoca vitulina). The results are consistent with the amphibious lifestyle of these seals and their apparent reliance on sound. The hearing data reported herein are the first available for spotted seals and can inform best management practices for this vulnerable species in a changing Arctic.
PubMed ID
24574387 View in PubMed
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Avian Influenza A(H10N7) virus-associated mass deaths among harbor seals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268261
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2015 Apr;21(4):720-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Rogier Bodewes
Theo M Bestebroer
Erhard van der Vries
Josanne H Verhagen
Sander Herfst
Marion P Koopmans
Ron A M Fouchier
Vanessa M Pfankuche
Peter Wohlsein
Ursula Siebert
Wolfgang Baumgärtner
Albert D M E Osterhaus
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2015 Apr;21(4):720-2
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Denmark - epidemiology
Influenza A Virus, H10N7 Subtype - classification - genetics
Orthomyxoviridae Infections - epidemiology - mortality - virology
Phoca - virology
Notes
Cites: Science. 2002 Jul 12;297(5579):20912114617
Cites: J Virol. 1984 Sep;51(3):863-56471169
Cites: Arch Virol. 1990;115(1-2):47-612174233
Cites: Lancet. 1998 Feb 14;351(9101):472-79482438
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2013 May 16;368(20):1888-9723577628
Cites: Rev Sci Tech. 2009 Apr;28(1):137-5919618623
Cites: Syst Biol. 2010 May;59(3):307-2120525638
Cites: MBio. 2012;3(4):e00166-1222851656
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(3):e5853423516501
Cites: PLoS Pathog. 2007 May 11;3(5):e6117500589
PubMed ID
25811303 View in PubMed
Less detail

Avian influenza A(H10N7) virus involvement in mass mortality of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) in Sweden, March through October 2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261777
Source
Euro Surveill. 2014;19(46)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
S. Zohari
A. Neimanis
T. Härkönen
C. Moraeus
J F Valarcher
Source
Euro Surveill. 2014;19(46)
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Birds - virology
Communicable Diseases, Emerging - mortality - veterinary - virology
Influenza A Virus, H10N7 Subtype - genetics - isolation & purification
Influenza in Birds - epidemiology
Orthomyxoviridae Infections - mortality - veterinary - virology
Phoca - virology
Phylogeny
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sweden
Abstract
We provide the first scientific report of influenza A virus involvement in a mass mortality event among harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) off the west coast of Sweden. Avian influenza A (H10N7) virus was detected in the lungs of two affected animals. This subtype has not been reported in seals to date, nor has influenza A-associated mortality been reported in seals in Europe. Circulation of avian influenza viruses in mammals may have implications for public health.
PubMed ID
25425511 View in PubMed
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A Bayesian Analysis of Abundance, Trend, and Population Viability for Harbor Seals in Iliamna Lake, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296889
Source
Risk Anal. 2018 09; 38(9):1988-2009
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-2018
Author
Peter L Boveng
Jay M Ver Hoef
David E Withrow
Josh M London
Author Affiliation
Marine Mammal Laboratory, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, WA, USA.
Source
Risk Anal. 2018 09; 38(9):1988-2009
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Algorithms
Animals
Bayes Theorem
Female
Lakes
Male
Markov Chains
Models, Statistical
Monte Carlo Method
Normal Distribution
Phoca
Population Dynamics
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Risk
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Harbor seals in Iliamna Lake, Alaska, are a small, isolated population, and one of only two freshwater populations of harbor seals in the world, yet little is known about their abundance or risk for extinction. Bayesian hierarchical models were used to estimate abundance and trend of this population. Observational models were developed from aerial survey and harvest data, and they included effects for time of year and time of day on survey counts. Underlying models of abundance and trend were based on a Leslie matrix model that used prior information on vital rates from the literature. We developed three scenarios for variability in the priors and used them as part of a sensitivity analysis. The models were fitted using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. The population production rate implied by the vital rate estimates was about 5% per year, very similar to the average annual harvest rate. After a period of growth in the 1980s, the population appears to be relatively stable at around 400 individuals. A population viability analysis assessing the risk of quasi-extinction, defined as any reduction to 50 animals or below in the next 100 years, ranged from 1% to 3%, depending on the prior scenario. Although this is moderately low risk, it does not include genetic or catastrophic environmental events, which may have occurred to the population in the past, so our results should be applied cautiously.
PubMed ID
29570825 View in PubMed
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Biomarker responses and decreasing contaminant levels in ringed seals (Pusa hispida) from Svalbard, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85995
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2008;71(15):1009-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Wolkers Hans
Krafft Bjørn A
van Bavel Bert
Helgason Lisa B
Lydersen Christian
Kovacs Kit M
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Polar Institute, Tromsø, Norway. Hans.Wolkers@npolar.no
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2008;71(15):1009-18
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry - metabolism
Animals
Biological Markers - analysis - metabolism
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - analysis - metabolism
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Liver - chemistry - metabolism
Male
Microsomes, Liver - chemistry - enzymology
Norway
Phoca - metabolism
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
Blubber was analyzed for a wide range of contaminants from five sub-adult and eight adult male ringed seals sampled in 2004, namely, for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), toxaphenes, chlordanes, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), and polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs). Contaminant levels were compared to previously sampled animals from the same area, as well as data from literature for other arctic wildlife species from a wide variety of locations. Ringed seals sampled in 2004 showed 50-90% lower levels of legacy contaminants such as PCBs and chlorinated pesticides compared to animals sampled in 1996 of similar age (14 sub-adults and 7 adult males), indicating that the decline of chlorinated contaminants observed during the 1990s in a variety of arctic wildlife species is continuing into the 21st century. The results also indicated that PBDE declined in ringed seals; levels in 2004 were about 70-80% lower than in animals sampled in 1998. This is one of the first observations of reduced exposure to these compounds and might be a first indication that restrictions of production and use of these contaminants have resulted in lower exposures in the Arctic. The PCB pattern shifted toward the less chlorinated (i.e., less persistent) PCBs, especially in adult ringed seals, possibly as a result of reduced overall contaminant exposures and a consequently lower cytochrome P-450 (CYP) induction, which results in a slower metabolism of less persistent PCBs. The overall effect would be relative increases in the lower chlorinated PCBs and a relative decreases in the higher chlorinated PCB. Possibly due to low exposure and consequent low induction levels, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation (EROD) activity proved to be a poor biomarker for contaminant exposure in ringed seals in the present study. The close negative correlation (r(2) = 70.9%)between EROD activity and percent blubber indicates that CYP might respond to increased bioavailability of the contaminant mixtures when they are mobilized from blubber during periods of reduced food intake.
PubMed ID
18569610 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biotransformation of PCBs in relation to phase I and II xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme activities in ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from Svalbard and the Baltic Sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90147
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2008 Dec 1;42(23):8952-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2008
Author
Routti Heli
Letcher Robert J
Arukwe Augustine
Van Bavel Bert
Yoccoz Nigel G
Chu Shaogang
Gabrielsen Geir W
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Polar Institute, Polar Environmental Centre, 9296 Tromsø, Norway. heli.routti@npolar.no
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2008 Dec 1;42(23):8952-8
Date
Dec-1-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biotransformation
Environmental monitoring
Female
Liver - enzymology
Male
Metabolic Detoxication, Phase I
Metabolic Detoxication, Phase II
Oceans and Seas
Phoca - metabolism
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Principal Component Analysis
Species Specificity
Svalbard
Xenobiotics - metabolism
Abstract
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) may induce activity of hepatic enzymes, mainly Phase I monooxygenases and conjugating Phase II enzymes, that catalyze the metabolism of PCBs leading to formation of metabolites and to potential adverse health effects. The present study investigates the concentration and pattern of PCBs, the induction of hepatic phase I and II enzymes, and the formation of hydroxy (OH) and methylsulfonyl (CH3SO2=MeSO2) PCB metabolites in two ringed seal (Phoca hispida) populations, which are contrasted by the degree of contamination exposure, that is, highly contaminated Baltic Sea (n=31) and less contaminated Svalbard (n=21). Phase I enzymes were measured as ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylation (EROD), benzyloxyresorufin-O-dealkylation (BROD), methoxyresorufin-O-demethylation (MROD), and pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylation (PROD) activities, and phase II enzymes were measured as uridine diphosphophate glucuronosyl transferase (UDPGT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Geographical comparison, multivariate, and correlation analysis indicated that sigma-PCB had a positive impact on Phase I enzyme and GST activities leading to biotransformation of group III (vicinal ortho-meta-H atoms and
PubMed ID
19192824 View in PubMed
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Blood concentrations of some persistent organohalogens in free-ranging spotted seals (Phoca largha) from Bristol Bay, Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83899
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2007 Oct;70(20):1776-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Neale, JCC
Small, RJ
Schmelzer, KR
Tjeerdema, RS
Author Affiliation
Department of Natural Resources, American River College, Sacramento, California 95841, USA. nealej@arc.losrios.edu
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2007 Oct;70(20):1776-8
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Female
Male
Phoca
Polybrominated Biphenyls - blood
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - blood
Seawater
Water Pollutants, Chemical - blood
Abstract
In recent years, the relatively high levels of organochlorine contaminants and increasing levels of brominated flame retardants found in tissues of marine mammals have raised concerns that exposure to these marine pollutants may compromise individual health. In this pilot study, levels of 11 polychlorinated biphenyls, 3 polybrominated diphenyl ethers, and the DDT metabolite p,p'-diphenyldichloroethylene were analyzed in whole blood of 7 free-ranging spotted seals (Phoca largha) from Bristol Bay, Alaska, sampled during 2000 and 2001. Blood concentrations of analytes were generally low (
PubMed ID
17885935 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 1 of 5.