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92 records – page 1 of 10.

Principles behind definitions of diseases--a criticism of the principle of disease mechanism and the development of a pragmatic alternative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19487
Source
Theor Med Bioeth. 2001 Aug;22(4):319-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
M. Severinsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Philosophy and Clinical Theory, University of Copenhagen, Panum Institute, Denmark. m.severinsen@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Theor Med Bioeth. 2001 Aug;22(4):319-36
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bioethics
Denmark
Disease - classification
Humans
Lymphoma - classification
Philosophy, Medical
Abstract
Many philosophers and medical scientists assume that disease categories or entities used to classify concrete cases of disease, are often defined by disease mechanisms or causal processes. Others suggest that diseases should always be defined in this manner. This paper discusses these standpoints critically and concludes that they are untenable, not only when 'disease mechanism' refers to an objective mechanism, but also when 'mechanism' refers to a pragmatically demarcated part of the total "objective" causal structure of diseases. As an alternative to principles that use the concept of disease mechanism or analogous concepts, a pragmatic approach is suggested and described. This approach has been suggested before, but in problematic or inadequate versions. This paper proposes a version compiled of two "pragmatic principles" and shows that they are much more adequate than the principle of disease mechanism. With reference to a case study of a still ongoing international discussion of various candidates for a classification system for malignant lymphomas, including REAL (Revised European-American Classification of Lymphoid Neoplasms) in which the concept of disease mechanism or analogous concepts plays a very small part, it is shown just how pivotal these two pragmatic principles can be in actual discussions of definitions of diseases. Finally, it is pointed out that with regard to modern philosophy of language it may, at least in some cases, be problematic to distinguish between the two pragmatic principles as they stand.
PubMed ID
11680525 View in PubMed
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Psychiatry: the philosophical link between medical sciences and the sociopolitical human condition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232241
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1988 Nov;33(8):681-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1988
Author
I A Kapkin
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University, Department of Psychiatry, Saint John, New Brunswick.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1988 Nov;33(8):681-5
Date
Nov-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Forecasting
Humans
Philosophy, Medical
Politics
Psychiatry - trends
Social Conditions
PubMed ID
3203267 View in PubMed
Less detail

Philosophy of medicine in Scandinavia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239188
Source
Theor Med. 1985 Feb;6(1):65-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1985
Author
B I Lindahl
Source
Theor Med. 1985 Feb;6(1):65-84
Date
Feb-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disease - classification - etiology
Health
Humans
Philosophy, Medical
Psychiatry
Psychoanalysis
Scandinavia
PubMed ID
4023958 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A proposal on suicide-clinics. A philosophical basis for ethical morass]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68464
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Dec 18;93(51-52):4708-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-18-1996
Author
G. Isacsson
Author Affiliation
allmänpsykiatriska kliniken, Huddinge sjukhus.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Dec 18;93(51-52):4708-9
Date
Dec-18-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ethics, Medical
Euthanasia
Hospital Units
Humans
Philosophy, Medical
Suicide, Assisted
Sweden
PubMed ID
9011710 View in PubMed
Less detail

Medical anthropology and development: a theoretical perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245310
Source
Soc Sci Med Med Anthropol. 1980 Nov;14B(4):197-207
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1980
Author
R. Frankenberg
Source
Soc Sci Med Med Anthropol. 1980 Nov;14B(4):197-207
Date
Nov-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Developing Countries
Humans
Medicine
Medicine, Traditional
Philosophy, Medical
Sociology, Medical
PubMed ID
7209591 View in PubMed
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[Is there a difference between killing and allowing to die?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206297
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Jan 30;118(3):422-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-1998
Author
K. Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Medisinsk avdeling, Regionsykehuset i Tromsø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Jan 30;118(3):422-4
Date
Jan-30-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ethics, Medical
Euthanasia - legislation & jurisprudence
Euthanasia, Passive - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Norway
Philosophy, Medical
PubMed ID
9499734 View in PubMed
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[On long-term sick leave--an immigrant?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191848
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Dec 19;98(51-52):5898-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-19-2001
Author
A K Furhoff
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Dec 19;98(51-52):5898-9
Date
Dec-19-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Philosophy, Medical
Physician-Patient Relations
Sick Leave
Sweden
Time Factors
PubMed ID
11806269 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1997 Jul;36(7):373-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1997
Author
R B Goldbloom
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1997 Jul;36(7):373-80
Date
Jul-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Family
Female
Humans
Pediatrics
Philosophy, Medical
Professional-Family Relations
Social Problems
PubMed ID
9241474 View in PubMed
Less detail

Quality of life philosophy I. Quality of life, happiness, and meaning in life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182587
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2003 Dec 1;3:1164-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2003
Author
Søren Ventegodt
Niels Jørgen Andersen
Joav Merrick
Author Affiliation
The quality of Life Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. ventegodt@livskvalitet.org
Source
ScientificWorldJournal. 2003 Dec 1;3:1164-75
Date
Dec-1-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Happiness
Human Development
Humans
Life
Philosophy, Medical
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Abstract
In the Danish Quality of Life Survey, we asked 10,000 people about their quality of life with the validated SEQOL questionnaire with more than 300 questions on their quality of life. How did they feel? How content were they with their lives? How happy were they? Did they feel their needs were fulfilled? And many more questions. We asked the questions we believed to be important for their quality of life (QOL). The results were quite surprising and forced us to recontemplate the following philosophical questions: What is quality of life, happiness, and meaning in life? What is a human being? Do we need a new biology? Is the brain the seat of consciousness? How do we seize the meaning of life and by doing so, will we become well again? What are the key concepts of quality of life? The meaning of life is connectedness and development. It is about realizing every opportunity and potential in one"s existence. The opportunities must be found and acknowledged. What do you find when you find yourself deep down? You find your real self and your purpose in life. You realize that you are already a part of a larger totality. Antonovsky called it "coherence". Maslow called it "transcendence". Frankl called it "meaning of life". We call it simply "being". To test if these philosophical questions are actually relevant for medicine, we looked at the consequences for patients being taught the quality of life philosophy. Quite surprisingly we learned from our pilot studies with "quality of life as medicine" that just by assimilating the basic concepts of the quality of life philosophy presented in this series of papers, patients felt better and saw their lives as more meaningful. The improvement of the patient"s personal philosophy of life seems to be the essence of holistic medicine, helping the patient to assume more responsibility for his or her own existence.
PubMed ID
14646011 View in PubMed
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Death and dying in medicine: what questions are still worth asking?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240456
Source
Theor Med. 1984 Jun;5(2):121-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1984

92 records – page 1 of 10.